Date   
Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Brandon Tibbitts
 

Yes I'd be interested in helping, but have been loaded with quite alot in general. I am experienced some in layout, and should be able to put something together if needed. Unless there is a quicker/easier route that is already in progress, i'd be happy to try though.

Were you thinking of .030 thick pcb or .062? I've used express PCB to get things done in the past and typically just design the board to the size I need, and cut them out, getting multiples out of the fixed size sheets they offer.(PCB 3.8 x 2.5 x .062 thick) The software is all manual place and routing, but for simpler circuits not too bad. Is there a desired connector for J's, or just solder pads to hard wire into? 


There are a couple of newer layout design software packages I've been looking at trying out. Things are rapidly evolving in PCB EDA and multiple open source options. Maybe this would be a good time to try one..


Brandon - KD7IIW

On Wed, Jun 21, 2017 at 12:43 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <tibbs327@...> wrote:
Yes I'd be interested in helping, but have been loaded with quite alot in general. I am experienced some in layout, and should be able to put something together if needed. Unless there is a quicker/easier route that is already in progress, i'd be happy to try though.

Were you thinking of .030 thick pcb or .062? I've used express PCB to get things done in the past and typically just design the board to the size I need, and cut them out, getting multiples out of the fixed size sheets they offer.(PCB 3.8 x 2.5 x .062 thick) The software is all manual place and routing, but for simpler circuits not too bad. Is there a desired connector for J's, or just solder pads to hard wire into? 


There are a couple of newer layout design software packages I've been looking at trying out. Things are rapidly evolving in PCB EDA and multiple open source options. Maybe this would be a good time to try one..


Brandon - KD7IIW

On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 4:35 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
As a quick update, I've been working with Jason from Etherkit and he's designing a breakout board for the clock generator - https://github.com/NT7S/Si5351APicoBoB/blob/master/pcb/Si5351APicoBoB.pdf It should be MUCH smaller and lighter than the existing board - I'm thinking at most 2 grams (if you don't add the headers and wire it directly).

He's going to upload to OSH Park after he's designed the PCB and I'm going to order at least a few soon. Is anyone else interested in some? Gary?

Now I'm considering designing a breakout for a small solar charge controller so I can use fewer panels. The idea is to charge the supercapacitor with the minimum number of solar cells possible while also ensuring that there's enough juice to get through the 2 minute transmissions.

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 6:01 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
He's not, but I've copied Brandon on this message to see if he's interested, or if he'd like to join the list - https://groups.io/g/BARC-HAB/

I think I can figure out which components can go away on the Si5351A board and order a prototype, but this level of electronics is definitely not my specialty.


Thanks,

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 4:30 PM, Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...> wrote:
Is Brandon Tibbetts on this list? He's done some PCB design work before.

Josh

On Jun 19, 2017 16:14, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
D'oh. Hit Send a bit too early.

Anyway... I could go from 9 to 4 (maybe 3 or 2) solar cells with a SPV1040 step-up converter / charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - (or similar) to charge the super capacitor to 5 volts. It would take a bit longer to charge it, but it should maintain the charge long enough for the regular transmissions. This would also need a custom PCB (at least I can't find an existing charger breakout board that is in the 0-2 gram weight range).

If I could pull off both of these adjustments, that should put my payload well below 15 grams which would be optimal for a higher altitude float.

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 4:06 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Does anyone have experience with PCB design?
My balloon payload finalized, I'm now at around 20 grams or so. This is 5 grams heavier than I want for optimal altitude. I can lose unnecessary resistors, etc., but this might gain me at most 1 gram.

My heaviest component by far is the Si5351A breakout board at 5.3 grams - https://www.etherkit.com/rf-modules/si5351a-breakout-board.html You'll notice that it's on a thick PCB, it has 3 outputs (I only need 1), and it has 5v to 3.3v conversion on-board (I'm strictly 3.3v). 

It should be 3.3v and one output only, with header and edge mount SMA pads. On a thin PCB, with 3.3v only and one output (header and edge-mount SMA pads), I think this could come in at 1 gram or less. I think this would be a very popular board that you could make some $$$ off of.

Is there anyone here or do you know anyone that would be interested in this. I'd fund the prototype boards, but need someone smarter than me to do the design. I have the full PCB design files and schematic for 3 different 5v/3.3v boards that would get you most of the way there.

Another possibility to lose weight is to most of my solar cells and add a solar upconverter/charger. It takes 9 panels to make 5 volts. They're very light weight (I think 4.5 grams for the full array - plus I need some infrastructure to keep them in place), but with a 









Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared Smith
 

Brandon -

Thank you for the offer. It sounds like this board is being designed, so that should be taken care of.

To answer your questions though, I'd want anything on the thinnest PCB board readily available for weight savings, though Express PCB looks pretty slick.

I'm going to try out this solar upconverter/charge controller - https://www.tindie.com/products/onehorse/bq25504-solar-cell-lipo-charger/ This should allow me to drop most of my solar cells to feed 1 volt or so to the upconverter which will charge the 5v supercapacitor to 4.2v. And it manages the system power and pulls the plug at 3.27 volts - so I won't drain the supercap overnight and won't get into a start/stop loop with the Arduino at sunrise/sunset. It also has a high/low pin to indicate low voltage, so I could detect this before starting a transmission.

I'd be happy to hear any thoughts on whether you think this is a good idea or if there's anything I'm overlooking. I mostly need to ensure that there's enough juice between the smaller solar cells and the supercap to get through each transmission.

I'm at 5.8 grams for my 9 solar cells, so going to 2 cells should save around 3.5 grams. The charge controller is only .7 grams (around .4 grams if I order the thinner board from OSH Park and assemble it myself), so that's a savings of around 3 grams.

If my first flights work, I might try designing and fabricating my own custom payload boards - one tiny board to handle everything would be VERY small and MUCH easier to put together on a payload - and more reliable too without all of the wiring. This is what most of the very successful (global circumnavigation is a good measure) floating balloons go with. Some are as low as 6 grams (the weight of one US quarter) for the entire payload!

Jared


On Wed, Jun 21, 2017 at 12:43 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <tibbs327@...> wrote:
Yes I'd be interested in helping, but have been loaded with quite alot in general. I am experienced some in layout, and should be able to put something together if needed. Unless there is a quicker/easier route that is already in progress, i'd be happy to try though.

Were you thinking of .030 thick pcb or .062? I've used express PCB to get things done in the past and typically just design the board to the size I need, and cut them out, getting multiples out of the fixed size sheets they offer.(PCB 3.8 x 2.5 x .062 thick) The software is all manual place and routing, but for simpler circuits not too bad. Is there a desired connector for J's, or just solder pads to hard wire into? 


There are a couple of newer layout design software packages I've been looking at trying out. Things are rapidly evolving in PCB EDA and multiple open source options. Maybe this would be a good time to try one..


Brandon - KD7IIW

On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 4:35 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
As a quick update, I've been working with Jason from Etherkit and he's designing a breakout board for the clock generator - https://github.com/NT7S/Si5351APicoBoB/blob/master/pcb/Si5351APicoBoB.pdf It should be MUCH smaller and lighter than the existing board - I'm thinking at most 2 grams (if you don't add the headers and wire it directly).

He's going to upload to OSH Park after he's designed the PCB and I'm going to order at least a few soon. Is anyone else interested in some? Gary?

Now I'm considering designing a breakout for a small solar charge controller so I can use fewer panels. The idea is to charge the supercapacitor with the minimum number of solar cells possible while also ensuring that there's enough juice to get through the 2 minute transmissions.

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 6:01 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
He's not, but I've copied Brandon on this message to see if he's interested, or if he'd like to join the list - https://groups.io/g/BARC-HAB/

I think I can figure out which components can go away on the Si5351A board and order a prototype, but this level of electronics is definitely not my specialty.


Thanks,

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 4:30 PM, Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...> wrote:
Is Brandon Tibbetts on this list? He's done some PCB design work before.

Josh

On Jun 19, 2017 16:14, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
D'oh. Hit Send a bit too early.

Anyway... I could go from 9 to 4 (maybe 3 or 2) solar cells with a SPV1040 step-up converter / charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - (or similar) to charge the super capacitor to 5 volts. It would take a bit longer to charge it, but it should maintain the charge long enough for the regular transmissions. This would also need a custom PCB (at least I can't find an existing charger breakout board that is in the 0-2 gram weight range).

If I could pull off both of these adjustments, that should put my payload well below 15 grams which would be optimal for a higher altitude float.

Jared


On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 4:06 PM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Does anyone have experience with PCB design?
My balloon payload finalized, I'm now at around 20 grams or so. This is 5 grams heavier than I want for optimal altitude. I can lose unnecessary resistors, etc., but this might gain me at most 1 gram.

My heaviest component by far is the Si5351A breakout board at 5.3 grams - https://www.etherkit.com/rf-modules/si5351a-breakout-board.html You'll notice that it's on a thick PCB, it has 3 outputs (I only need 1), and it has 5v to 3.3v conversion on-board (I'm strictly 3.3v). 

It should be 3.3v and one output only, with header and edge mount SMA pads. On a thin PCB, with 3.3v only and one output (header and edge-mount SMA pads), I think this could come in at 1 gram or less. I think this would be a very popular board that you could make some $$$ off of.

Is there anyone here or do you know anyone that would be interested in this. I'd fund the prototype boards, but need someone smarter than me to do the design. I have the full PCB design files and schematic for 3 different 5v/3.3v boards that would get you most of the way there.

Another possibility to lose weight is to most of my solar cells and add a solar upconverter/charger. It takes 9 panels to make 5 volts. They're very light weight (I think 4.5 grams for the full array - plus I need some infrastructure to keep them in place), but with a 









Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Brandon Tibbitts
 

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon

Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared Smith
 

Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon


Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared Smith
 

After realizing the previous charge controller wouldn't work, I decided to design my own. The schematic and PCB renders are attached. This uses the SPV1040 charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - and is generally based on their example board - http://www.st.com/resource/en/application_note/cd00292052.pdf

The board is very small - only 1 inch X .5 inches. The components are mostly tiny 0603 size - so should be a fun challenge to solder. The IC is 3mmX4.4mm.

The S+/- pads are for the small solar cells. I should be able to use 2 of them in series to make ~1.2 volts. The circuit then upconverts this to 5 volts which charges the supercapacitor (CAP+/-) which functions as a battery (except this one works at -40 degrees). It then routes back to V+/- which will go to the Arduino raw power input. Most of the capacitors and resistors are used to set the controller charge values.

There's also a voltage divider on the output that goes to the A connector. This will allow me to measure the output voltage from the Arduino so I don't transmit or turn on the GPS if the voltage is too low.

Feedback or criticism of the design is VERY welcome. I figure I have around 50/50 odds that I designed this in a way that will actually work. I'll order up some PCBs from OSH Park soon and give it a go.

Thanks,

Jared



On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 8:06 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon



Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Josh Jensen
 

Jared,

0603 components aren't that bad to solder. It's when you get down to 0402 size that they get to be a pain. 

Josh

On Jul 6, 2017 09:46, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
After realizing the previous charge controller wouldn't work, I decided to design my own. The schematic and PCB renders are attached. This uses the SPV1040 charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - and is generally based on their example board - http://www.st.com/resource/en/application_note/cd00292052.pdf

The board is very small - only 1 inch X .5 inches. The components are mostly tiny 0603 size - so should be a fun challenge to solder. The IC is 3mmX4.4mm.

The S+/- pads are for the small solar cells. I should be able to use 2 of them in series to make ~1.2 volts. The circuit then upconverts this to 5 volts which charges the supercapacitor (CAP+/-) which functions as a battery (except this one works at -40 degrees). It then routes back to V+/- which will go to the Arduino raw power input. Most of the capacitors and resistors are used to set the controller charge values.

There's also a voltage divider on the output that goes to the A connector. This will allow me to measure the output voltage from the Arduino so I don't transmit or turn on the GPS if the voltage is too low.

Feedback or criticism of the design is VERY welcome. I figure I have around 50/50 odds that I designed this in a way that will actually work. I'll order up some PCBs from OSH Park soon and give it a go.

Thanks,

Jared



On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 8:06 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon



Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Kevin Reeve
 

Jared,

I have a temp controlled soldering station that includes the heat gun for SMD work/rework, and various tip sizes.  I also have some awesome indium solder. You are welcome to use it.

 There are some great SMD solder videos on Utube.  Some use solder paste across the pads, hold the component with tweezers and heat it up with the heat gun and push in place.

Kevin


From: <BARC-HAB@groups.io> on behalf of Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...>
Reply-To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, July 6, 2017 at 10:14 AM
To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BARC-HAB] PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared,

0603 components aren't that bad to solder. It's when you get down to 0402 size that they get to be a pain. 

Josh

On Jul 6, 2017 09:46, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
After realizing the previous charge controller wouldn't work, I decided to design my own. The schematic and PCB renders are attached. This uses the SPV1040 charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - and is generally based on their example board - http://www.st.com/resource/en/application_note/cd00292052.pdf

The board is very small - only 1 inch X .5 inches. The components are mostly tiny 0603 size - so should be a fun challenge to solder. The IC is 3mmX4.4mm.

The S+/- pads are for the small solar cells. I should be able to use 2 of them in series to make ~1.2 volts. The circuit then upconverts this to 5 volts which charges the supercapacitor (CAP+/-) which functions as a battery (except this one works at -40 degrees). It then routes back to V+/- which will go to the Arduino raw power input. Most of the capacitors and resistors are used to set the controller charge values.

There's also a voltage divider on the output that goes to the A connector. This will allow me to measure the output voltage from the Arduino so I don't transmit or turn on the GPS if the voltage is too low.

Feedback or criticism of the design is VERY welcome. I figure I have around 50/50 odds that I designed this in a way that will actually work. I'll order up some PCBs from OSH Park soon and give it a go.

Thanks,

Jared



On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 8:06 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon



USU launch Saturday morning

Jared Smith
 

I don't have any other details, but if any of you are available to help support this, that would be very helpful. I'm not sure yet if I'll be around. Kevin or I will send more details as we get them.

Jared

Re: USU launch Saturday morning

Tyler Griffiths
 

I may be at the one day class. But I do not teach till after lunch so I can probably be there in the morning. 

Tyler 


On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 7:00 AM Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
I don't have any other details, but if any of you are available to help support this, that would be very helpful. I'm not sure yet if I'll be around. Kevin or I will send more details as we get them.

Jared

--
Tyler, Sent from Gmail Mobile

Re: USU launch Saturday morning

ag1t@...
 

We won't be able to make it.  We will be out with the scouts hiking from Tony Grove to Bunchgrass that morning.  We will listen for it though.

  Gary

Re: USU launch Saturday morning

Josh Jensen
 

I should be able to help. I usually wake up about halfway between launch and burst.
:)

Josh

On Jul 13, 2017 09:57, <ag1t@...> wrote:
We won't be able to make it.  We will be out with the scouts hiking from Tony Grove to Bunchgrass that morning.  We will listen for it though.

  Gary

Re: USU launch Saturday morning

Jared Smith
 

Thanks to those that helped with the launch and recovery today. It was a great success for the USU GAS team.

Attached are KML files for the estimate and actual. There's also a spreadsheet with the APRS data. We missed only 2 beacons while in flight. At the bottom are charts for altitude and ascent rate. Average ascent rate was 5.03m/s. We'd predicted 4.8 at the last minute - they didn't bring enough helium to the launch site. It started lower than that and ascended at slightly higher rates as it climbed - I suspect due to increased temperatures.

Our descent rate extrapolated to sea level was 6.75 m/s. I'd predicted 8 m/s. So that finally gives us a good target for the 5' parachute - at least with a ~5 pound payload.

Overall, our prediction was VERY close - it landed within .8 miles of our predicted landing spot!

They're looking at another launch or two on the 29th.

My HAB plans continue. I received the new, smaller transmitter board, but it's interfering with the GPS reception. It seems the 25MHz clock generator is sending a signal back down the voltage wire that makes it so the GPS won't get a fix. If I unplug the transmitter, the GPS gets a fix almost instantly. I've tried numerous methods for decoupling the signal, but am not having much luck. I'd be happy to hear recommendations.

The solar charge controller I designed should be here in a week or so. If it actually works, and if I can figure out the GPS conflicts, I should be ready for a launch in a few weeks or so.

Jared


On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 12:39 PM, Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...> wrote:
I should be able to help. I usually wake up about halfway between launch and burst.
:)

Josh

On Jul 13, 2017 09:57, <ag1t@...> wrote:
We won't be able to make it.  We will be out with the scouts hiking from Tony Grove to Bunchgrass that morning.  We will listen for it though.

  Gary


SP9UOB balloon over Cache Valley

Jared Smith
 

A high altitude pico balloon launched in Poland on June 15 is over the North end of the valley now at 47,000 feet. You can track it at https://tracker.habhub.org/#!mt=roadmap&mz=9&qm=All&mc=41.78482,-111.60041&q=SP9UOB

It beacons with APRS every minute. Contestia 32/1000 on 144.251 MHz USB every minute. CW every 5 minutes and "HI" between telemetry transmissions on 144.251 MHz USB.

Jared


Re: SP9UOB balloon over Cache Valley

Bob Wood
 

S9 here on 144.251 CW and telemetry

On Tue, Jul 18, 2017 at 8:41 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
A high altitude pico balloon launched in Poland on June 15 is over the North end of the valley now at 47,000 feet. You can track it at https://tracker.habhub.org/#!mt=roadmap&mz=9&qm=All&mc=41.78482,-111.60041&q=SP9UOB

It beacons with APRS every minute. Contestia 32/1000 on 144.251 MHz USB every minute. CW every 5 minutes and "HI" between telemetry transmissions on 144.251 MHz USB.

Jared





--
Bob Wood WA7MXZ
Logan, Utah  wa7mxz@...

Re: SP9UOB balloon over Cache Valley

Tyler Griffiths
 

Pretty bad path for a balloon. Wide1-1,Wide2-1



Tyler Griffiths
N7UWX

See where I am:
http://goo.gl/nC3m57

On Tue, Jul 18, 2017 at 8:41 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
A high altitude pico balloon launched in Poland on June 15 is over the North end of the valley now at 47,000 feet. You can track it at https://tracker.habhub.org/#!mt=roadmap&mz=9&qm=All&mc=41.78482,-111.60041&q=SP9UOB

It beacons with APRS every minute. Contestia 32/1000 on 144.251 MHz USB every minute. CW every 5 minutes and "HI" between telemetry transmissions on 144.251 MHz USB.

Jared



Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared Smith
 

My charge controller boards have arrived and they actually work - despite my soldering skills! Photos are attached.

I'll probably design a second version with a few minor modifications - mostly a smaller Schottky diode, bigger pads for that pesky Inductor (the L1 silver component near the top left), and better labelling.

This charges the supercapacitor to 5.2 volts from only a couple small .5v solar cells. I now need to determine how many solar cells I need to provide sufficient current for the 2 minute transmission. My current draw is 3-5mA when idle, 35mA during GPS acquisition, and 42 mA when transmitting.

I hacked around the issue of the transmitter interfering with the GPS. I added an NPN transistor to act as a switch to use the Arduino to turn the power on to the transmitter only when it's needed. Unfortunately, when I turned it on, the interference kicked the GPS out of sleep mode (jumping it from 5mA to 30mA, or 70+mA for everything). So I added a second switch to turn the GPS off when it's not needed. This adds a bit of weight and requires a longer cold boot GPS fix every 10 minutes, but that shouldn't be an issue at 40,000 feet.

If I can get the antenna set up and everything tied together, I might see if the USU folks will let me fly one on one of their balloons this Saturday.

Jared


On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 10:25 AM, Kevin Reeve <kevin.reeve@...> wrote:
Jared,

I have a temp controlled soldering station that includes the heat gun for SMD work/rework, and various tip sizes.  I also have some awesome indium solder. You are welcome to use it.

 There are some great SMD solder videos on Utube.  Some use solder paste across the pads, hold the component with tweezers and heat it up with the heat gun and push in place.

Kevin


From: <BARC-HAB@groups.io> on behalf of Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...>
Reply-To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, July 6, 2017 at 10:14 AM
To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BARC-HAB] PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared,

0603 components aren't that bad to solder. It's when you get down to 0402 size that they get to be a pain. 

Josh

On Jul 6, 2017 09:46, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
After realizing the previous charge controller wouldn't work, I decided to design my own. The schematic and PCB renders are attached. This uses the SPV1040 charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - and is generally based on their example board - http://www.st.com/resource/en/application_note/cd00292052.pdf

The board is very small - only 1 inch X .5 inches. The components are mostly tiny 0603 size - so should be a fun challenge to solder. The IC is 3mmX4.4mm.

The S+/- pads are for the small solar cells. I should be able to use 2 of them in series to make ~1.2 volts. The circuit then upconverts this to 5 volts which charges the supercapacitor (CAP+/-) which functions as a battery (except this one works at -40 degrees). It then routes back to V+/- which will go to the Arduino raw power input. Most of the capacitors and resistors are used to set the controller charge values.

There's also a voltage divider on the output that goes to the A connector. This will allow me to measure the output voltage from the Arduino so I don't transmit or turn on the GPS if the voltage is too low.

Feedback or criticism of the design is VERY welcome. I figure I have around 50/50 odds that I designed this in a way that will actually work. I'll order up some PCBs from OSH Park soon and give it a go.

Thanks,

Jared



On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 8:06 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon




Re: PCB designer? Weight issues.

Josh Jensen
 

Jared,

If you can't hitch a ride on a is balloon, I'm still willing to take you up on the hexacopter. I have a telemetry down link now, so I can see what the status is. Including altitude. It would just have to wait until I get back in town, which looks like it will be the 31st.

Josh

On Jul 24, 2017 01:20, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
My charge controller boards have arrived and they actually work - despite my soldering skills! Photos are attached.

I'll probably design a second version with a few minor modifications - mostly a smaller Schottky diode, bigger pads for that pesky Inductor (the L1 silver component near the top left), and better labelling.

This charges the supercapacitor to 5.2 volts from only a couple small .5v solar cells. I now need to determine how many solar cells I need to provide sufficient current for the 2 minute transmission. My current draw is 3-5mA when idle, 35mA during GPS acquisition, and 42 mA when transmitting.

I hacked around the issue of the transmitter interfering with the GPS. I added an NPN transistor to act as a switch to use the Arduino to turn the power on to the transmitter only when it's needed. Unfortunately, when I turned it on, the interference kicked the GPS out of sleep mode (jumping it from 5mA to 30mA, or 70+mA for everything). So I added a second switch to turn the GPS off when it's not needed. This adds a bit of weight and requires a longer cold boot GPS fix every 10 minutes, but that shouldn't be an issue at 40,000 feet.

If I can get the antenna set up and everything tied together, I might see if the USU folks will let me fly one on one of their balloons this Saturday.

Jared


On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 10:25 AM, Kevin Reeve <kevin.reeve@...> wrote:
Jared,

I have a temp controlled soldering station that includes the heat gun for SMD work/rework, and various tip sizes.  I also have some awesome indium solder. You are welcome to use it.

 There are some great SMD solder videos on Utube.  Some use solder paste across the pads, hold the component with tweezers and heat it up with the heat gun and push in place.

Kevin


From: <BARC-HAB@groups.io> on behalf of Josh Jensen <kd7wrc@...>
Reply-To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, July 6, 2017 at 10:14 AM
To: "BARC-HAB@groups.io" <BARC-HAB@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BARC-HAB] PCB designer? Weight issues.

Jared,

0603 components aren't that bad to solder. It's when you get down to 0402 size that they get to be a pain. 

Josh

On Jul 6, 2017 09:46, "Jared Smith" <jared@...> wrote:
After realizing the previous charge controller wouldn't work, I decided to design my own. The schematic and PCB renders are attached. This uses the SPV1040 charge controller - http://www.st.com/en/power-management/spv1040.html - and is generally based on their example board - http://www.st.com/resource/en/application_note/cd00292052.pdf

The board is very small - only 1 inch X .5 inches. The components are mostly tiny 0603 size - so should be a fun challenge to solder. The IC is 3mmX4.4mm.

The S+/- pads are for the small solar cells. I should be able to use 2 of them in series to make ~1.2 volts. The circuit then upconverts this to 5 volts which charges the supercapacitor (CAP+/-) which functions as a battery (except this one works at -40 degrees). It then routes back to V+/- which will go to the Arduino raw power input. Most of the capacitors and resistors are used to set the controller charge values.

There's also a voltage divider on the output that goes to the A connector. This will allow me to measure the output voltage from the Arduino so I don't transmit or turn on the GPS if the voltage is too low.

Feedback or criticism of the design is VERY welcome. I figure I have around 50/50 odds that I designed this in a way that will actually work. I'll order up some PCBs from OSH Park soon and give it a go.

Thanks,

Jared



On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 8:06 AM, Jared Smith <jared@...> wrote:
Thank you Brandon.


I'll put together a GitHub repository for the code and will share it soon. You won't really be able to test it without the hardware, but I'm happy to share it.

The charge controller didn't work as expected. The idea was good (the board was only .6 grams), but I didn't realize that the IC has an input current limiter of 100mA. With the voltage upconvert (1.5v converted to 4.2v), this decreases current and didn't leave enough to keep things running. By the time I added enough solar cells to maintain adequate current, it no longer provided a weight saving to use the charge controller. I'm looking at different options - or just might go with a slightly smaller solar cell and run 8 or 9 of them.

I've been testing everything and it seems to work great. I have it sitting out in the sun this morning to see what happens in marginal solar conditions as the sun comes up. The WSPR mode is incredibly efficient - it was heard in Florida on 10 milliwatts last night. The new, smaller clock generator should be here in a couple weeks, then I think I'll have most everything necessary for a launch.

Jared




On Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 11:48 PM, Brandon Tibbitts <Tibbs327@...> wrote:

Yep, that sounds like you're on the right track. I'll keep my eye open for thin PCB options, and once everything is proven out, then could help put it all to one thin/tiny PCB. As you mentioned that is key for longer term reliability.

Simple GPS antenna work better horizontal, but not entirely deaf while vertical either..

Do you have a system/component overview? Or did I miss it somewhere. Also were you archiving the code somewhere?

Brandon




Balloon launch this Saturday? Helium?

Jared Smith
 

Thanks again to those who helped with the balloon tracking and
recovery last weekend.

If everything comes together and if the weather cooperates, I'm hoping
to try my own launch this Saturday.

Kevin (or others), where do you source the helium from? Do you use the
standard industrial grade helium? Can I just walk into AirGas and get
what I need?

I'm going to float 1 (or maybe 2, depending on my final payload
weight) X 36" mylar balloons. The helium requirement is around 3.5
cubic feet each. So I should be able to do 2 or 3 launches with a Size
20 (20 cubic feet) cylinder.

I'm also designing a new PCB that will act as a shield for the Arduino
Mini. It will have the GPS, transmitter, and charge controller all on
one board and will mate directly with the Arduino via headers - thus
nearly eliminating my need for wires - and greatly reducing the total
payload weight.

I'll keep you apprised of launch details.

Thanks,

Jared

Re: Balloon launch this Saturday? Helium?

Kevin Reeve
 

Jared,

We have gotten our helium from USU lab gas sales on campus.
I think they get it from AirGas.



Kevin

On 8/6/17, 6:57 PM, "BARC-HAB@groups.io on behalf of Jared Smith" <BARC-HAB@groups.io on behalf of jared@...> wrote:

Thanks again to those who helped with the balloon tracking and
recovery last weekend.

If everything comes together and if the weather cooperates, I'm hoping
to try my own launch this Saturday.

Kevin (or others), where do you source the helium from? Do you use the
standard industrial grade helium? Can I just walk into AirGas and get
what I need?

I'm going to float 1 (or maybe 2, depending on my final payload
weight) X 36" mylar balloons. The helium requirement is around 3.5
cubic feet each. So I should be able to do 2 or 3 launches with a Size
20 (20 cubic feet) cylinder.

I'm also designing a new PCB that will act as a shield for the Arduino
Mini. It will have the GPS, transmitter, and charge controller all on
one board and will mate directly with the Arduino via headers - thus
nearly eliminating my need for wires - and greatly reducing the total
payload weight.

I'll keep you apprised of launch details.

Thanks,

Jared


Re: Balloon launch this Saturday? Helium?

Jared Smith
 

Thanks Kevin. I'll check with AirGas and see what they can provide.

I'm not sure if I'll be able to get a payload fully together by
Saturday, but I'm going to try because the forecast looks good. I have
to launch when it's very clear. I also have to account for downwind
storms to try to avoid high altitude thunderstorms. With a neck lift
of only 2-3 grams (about the weight of a dime) if the balloon passes
through any clouds it will pick up enough condensation to bring it
down.

The USU GAS team is planning a launch tomorrow (Wednesday) with the
payload for the Japanese students. I'm not sure of specifics (date,
location, etc.), but they want to fully support it themselves - which
I think is wonderful (and I'll cross my fingers for their success).
But you may want to monitor APRS or HabHub. I believe the call will be
ERRNO-1.

Jared

On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 7:04 PM, Kevin Reeve <kevin.reeve@...> wrote:
Jared,

We have gotten our helium from USU lab gas sales on campus.
I think they get it from AirGas.



Kevin





On 8/6/17, 6:57 PM, "BARC-HAB@groups.io on behalf of Jared Smith" <BARC-HAB@groups.io on behalf of jared@...> wrote:

Thanks again to those who helped with the balloon tracking and
recovery last weekend.

If everything comes together and if the weather cooperates, I'm hoping
to try my own launch this Saturday.

Kevin (or others), where do you source the helium from? Do you use the
standard industrial grade helium? Can I just walk into AirGas and get
what I need?

I'm going to float 1 (or maybe 2, depending on my final payload
weight) X 36" mylar balloons. The helium requirement is around 3.5
cubic feet each. So I should be able to do 2 or 3 launches with a Size
20 (20 cubic feet) cylinder.

I'm also designing a new PCB that will act as a shield for the Arduino
Mini. It will have the GPS, transmitter, and charge controller all on
one board and will mate directly with the Arduino via headers - thus
nearly eliminating my need for wires - and greatly reducing the total
payload weight.

I'll keep you apprised of launch details.

Thanks,

Jared