Topics

Oh No——- not a good day...


Ken Nelson
 




Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


David Russel
 

Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>


Gerard Chateauvieux
 

I had  ‘63 Chevy SS when I was in high school. It definitely had an “ACC” position. Not only could you remove the key, but the barrel was shaped such that you could rotate to different functions by hand with the key out. As long as you didn’t rotate to the locked position, you could operate it as much as you wanted without the key.

Other Chevy’s I’ve owned:
1964 Chevrolet Corsair Monday Spyder
1955 Chevrolet 210
And currently own a 1937 Chevrolet Master Deluxe.

All except the 37 had the key setup. I always loved it.

Gerard


On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:47 AM, David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:

Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>


Red Fred
 

Same thing happened up here on the Mtn, when a poor kid inherited his Dad's '37 Olds Coupe.  The Coupe was a hot rod with no front fenders, but had crazy zoomy style exhaust headers sticking out the side.   Of  course, it had a modern tilt steering column.   Well, seems the car died while being driven, so the kid turned off the key to restart.   Then the steering locked in a  turn, and he wacked the wall.   Bummer.


On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 11:47 AM David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:
Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>


Raymond Nierlich
 

This topic illustrates perfectly why I disable the steering lock on my oldish vehicles so equipped. They are certainly not a safety feature and they don't deter theft. 
A long time ago my '78 ElCamino got stolen. I learned you can smash the column cover with one good bash on GM vehicles of that era.  (Tilt columns are a pain to repair properly) 
From personal experience I know that column lock equipped Ford vehicles have a safety feature designed in. Somewhere around when they roll the odo over you can rotate the lock with or without the key no problem. 

Who can tell us what was the point of the steering lock in the first place? I think it is one of those things like 5mph bumpers or sealed beam headlights. Initially well intentioned perhaps, but once proven dumb, it takes an act of God to get rid of the regulation that requires them.
If you do disable the column lock an added plus is it makes the vehicle way easier to maneuver around the garage or driveway when using the armstrong method. I have English and French cars here so this an important point.

Ray

On Monday, November 2, 2020, 12:45:39 PM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Same thing happened up here on the Mtn, when a poor kid inherited his Dad's '37 Olds Coupe.  The Coupe was a hot rod with no front fenders, but had crazy zoomy style exhaust headers sticking out the side.   Of  course, it had a modern tilt steering column.   Well, seems the car died while being driven, so the kid turned off the key to restart.   Then the steering locked in a  turn, and he wacked the wall.   Bummer.

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 11:47 AM David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:
Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>


David Russel
 

I assume the lock was introduced as it was so simple to Hotwire the ignition and use a screwdriver on the solenoid to start and steal a car without a key.  It probably kept some teenagers from joyriding in stolen cars. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 1:37 PM, Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


This topic illustrates perfectly why I disable the steering lock on my oldish vehicles so equipped. They are certainly not a safety feature and they don't deter theft. 
A long time ago my '78 ElCamino got stolen. I learned you can smash the column cover with one good bash on GM vehicles of that era.  (Tilt columns are a pain to repair properly) 
From personal experience I know that column lock equipped Ford vehicles have a safety feature designed in. Somewhere around when they roll the odo over you can rotate the lock with or without the key no problem. 

Who can tell us what was the point of the steering lock in the first place? I think it is one of those things like 5mph bumpers or sealed beam headlights. Initially well intentioned perhaps, but once proven dumb, it takes an act of God to get rid of the regulation that requires them.
If you do disable the column lock an added plus is it makes the vehicle way easier to maneuver around the garage or driveway when using the armstrong method. I have English and French cars here so this an important point.

Ray

On Monday, November 2, 2020, 12:45:39 PM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Same thing happened up here on the Mtn, when a poor kid inherited his Dad's '37 Olds Coupe.  The Coupe was a hot rod with no front fenders, but had crazy zoomy style exhaust headers sticking out the side.   Of  course, it had a modern tilt steering column.   Well, seems the car died while being driven, so the kid turned off the key to restart.   Then the steering locked in a  turn, and he wacked the wall.   Bummer.

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 11:47 AM David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:
Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>


Keith Murphy
 

Ok, so you  have permission to have a good day - get your micro’s out and drive to the polls! ... https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=anO0IkJFQ0c

On Nov 2, 2020, at 1:37 PM, Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich@...> wrote:


This topic illustrates perfectly why I disable the steering lock on my oldish vehicles so equipped. They are certainly not a safety feature and they don't deter theft. 
A long time ago my '78 ElCamino got stolen. I learned you can smash the column cover with one good bash on GM vehicles of that era.  (Tilt columns are a pain to repair properly) 
From personal experience I know that column lock equipped Ford vehicles have a safety feature designed in. Somewhere around when they roll the odo over you can rotate the lock with or without the key no problem. 

Who can tell us what was the point of the steering lock in the first place? I think it is one of those things like 5mph bumpers or sealed beam headlights. Initially well intentioned perhaps, but once proven dumb, it takes an act of God to get rid of the regulation that requires them.
If you do disable the column lock an added plus is it makes the vehicle way easier to maneuver around the garage or driveway when using the armstrong method. I have English and French cars here so this an important point.

Ray

On Monday, November 2, 2020, 12:45:39 PM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Same thing happened up here on the Mtn, when a poor kid inherited his Dad's '37 Olds Coupe.  The Coupe was a hot rod with no front fenders, but had crazy zoomy style exhaust headers sticking out the side.   Of  course, it had a modern tilt steering column.   Well, seems the car died while being driven, so the kid turned off the key to restart.   Then the steering locked in a  turn, and he wacked the wall.   Bummer.

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 11:47 AM David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:
Ken,

It was many years ago when it saw the story in the SF Chronicle about a guy driving down the Waldo grade wanting to get the cash ready to pay the toll on the GG bridge. He realized he’d locked his wallet in the glovebox, turned off the ignition to remove the key & unlock the glove box, and crashed on the right shoulder due to the steering lock. 

Not like those years in the 50’s when Chevy (and maybe other GM cars) allowed the key to be removed when ign was on and the lock had tabs so the switch could be turned off and the car restarted without the key. Think those switches had 4 positions: Lock, Off, On, & Start. If key was removed in On or Off the car could be started, driven, and turned off without the key.  Only removing the key in the Lock position made the key necessary for restarting. Don’t recall if there was an accessories position as well. 

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Nov 2, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:





Where are my keys???

 


 

 Subject: Oh No——- not a good day...

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

<Bugger.mp4>