Franz oil filter/Guano Filter


Bruce Dewing
 

Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Ken Nelson
 

Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Red Fred
 

In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Ken Nelson
 

Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken


On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Lou
 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
On 12/30/2020 9:42 PM, Ken Nelson wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale






Red Fred
 

Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Raymond Nierlich
 

More on the Prestone coolant results please. Thanks in advance Fred, 
Ray

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 07:40:50 AM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Red Fred
 

I think that the highly sensitive system of the 810-812 Cord considered these filters as snake oil.  They soon clogged, and restricted the flow even when new.   This is a non-pressurized cooling system, with coolant carrying aluminum heads, on a cast iron block.   Prestone 50/50 seems to  be the best coolant to use.   My buddy Lloyd, who was the head mechanic for the extensive Keller Collection in Petaluma (extensive Mercedes 540Ks, Bugatti, Hispano, Ferrari, etc....) has been conducting an on going experiment with all the different coolant products for many years.    These experiments are now housed deep in the bowels of the Academy of Arts main collector car facility in San Francisco, where Lloyd is the head mechanic for that 300 car fleet of Duesenburgs, Packards, Pierce Arrows, and even a Tucker.  He has many coolant filled cars with the same water pump part submerged.  This is just a static experiment, with no heat, or combustion fluctuations.  Just the same part, submerged in different examples of all the known concoctions for coolant.   
    The results are amazing.   Some have completely evaporated, others have grown fur, and some look like parts from the submerged Titanic.   The Prestone 50/50 constantly out performs all the others in this test.   Therefore, the entire fleet of the SF AofA, and of the Keller Collection, run this coolant/antifreeze.   I run it in all of my buggies as well.   I firstly cleanse the system with an over-the-counter radiator flush, then rinse it out again with distilled water, then employ the Prestone 50/50 straight; undiluted.   I do try and affix a sacrificial zinc pellet in the upper radiator tank though.   These I try to suspend from the radiator cap with the small stainless steel chain provided.   I ordered many of these little pellets when I had access to good ol'fashioned auto parts store.  I haven't attempted to source them lately though.

After that, it's occasional flushing & repeating the process, as one can't find Cord stuff at Safeway.

Merry Motoring, RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:30 AM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
More on the Prestone coolant results please. Thanks in advance Fred, 
Ray

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 07:40:50 AM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Ken Nelson
 

Fred, is the Prestone 50/50 just AF & half water?  When you say undiluted, doesn't 50/50 imply that it's already half diluted with water versus concentrated, full strength AF?  Just want to make sure I understand what it is.  

When I was working with Ford's engine group in Dearborn, they were having awful troubles with the then new 3.8 L V6 - seems they had to be very careful during filling them with coolant and purging air -  if they weren't careful, as near as I could understand, if the new AF didn't completely wet the insides of the alum. heads, they'd get either bad corrosion or something nasty would happen. They had started having problems with the 3.8 L V6, which routinely lost head gaskets - I got some idea that the coolant had to react with the alum. by coating it completely to seal the material, or inhibit corrosion in some way, or damage would occur. maybe it was connected to the AF filling procedure.  Around that time period, I found a cherry Taurus 3.8 L V6 in a Mother Teresa donation lot, driven by a Pastor, was in very nice condition and price was cheap - tried it out in the lot - sounded fine, but had first to fill the radiator to test it - then found out why - sounded fine when fired up, so as I got out to pop the hood and look at it closely, saw water shooting out the exhaust!  Another blown head gasket!  This was back in late '90s

Ford was having some major problems with their engines re cooling - I had started working with them just as they were completing the launch of their first all glass-reinforced nylon V8 intake manifold for the 4.6L  engine.  The conversion from sandcast alum. to plastic lightened the car by 10 pounds - that sort of wt save can't be done anymore - not to mention the part probably cost them half the metal one, helped insulate the injectors from vapor lock due to the insulating nature of nylon so helped hot restart in ho climes, and they got free horsepower as the runners were molded against eutectic metal diecast cores, smooth as a port & polish job - free of charge!  It was a win-win-win-win for Ford, then they asked Dupont to drop the price of our material!  Thanks a lot!  

Only prob was - I had to inform the design team mgr that our FEA guys had found a smoking gun when they analyzed the CAD model - a high stress corner in the water crossover passage from one head to the other.  They had copied the alum. geometry straight - without taking into acct the material property differences between alum & nylon.  And they were unaware of very high frequency pressure pulses generated somehow inside the engine that wanted to crack the coolant passage at the sharp internal corner.  I had joined this project shortly before they finished the molds and it was too late to fix it, but the Ford mgr sure didn't like what I told him!  Hey, they hadn't consulted us at the start of the program, and they wanted to shoot the messenger.  I had just completed the launch of our plastic bodypanel program & had gone after the manifold as no one else had any experience in engine parts, yet I'd found Porsche had launched their plastic intake program on the '72 911 and was 20 yrs ahead of Detroit!  At least I'd found the weak link for them, but I had to become Ford's test center for fixing the part for the next 3 yrs, running my test rig 24/7 pressure-pulsing 12 parts simultaneously & finding ways to reduce the sharp stress-concentrating corner.  Long story short, the problem surfaced first  on the Crown Vic police car fleets, eventually becoming a class action lawsuit when consumers found the issue.  The final fix was converting the integral plastic water crossover to a separate alum. part, and the rest of the intake stayed nylon for all the other benefits.  

Later on, Ford had another cooling issue when new cars started losing engines due to overheating.  Seems somewhere along the manufacturing line, the diecasting molds for the alum. waterpump housings were having to be built up from erosion of the dies by welding and grinding them back to design shape.  Unfortunately some rebuilders didn't duplicate the orignal internal design, but blocked off flow to one bank of cylinders!  That side would overheat and blow the gasket, damaging the engine along the way - one of our reps Ford new company car lost its engine to this problem!  

And didn't GM switch to some new coolant called Dexcool?  I seem to recall something about that, but don't know why or what the problem was - do they still recommend Dexcool today?

Ken


On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:03 AM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
I think that the highly sensitive system of the 810-812 Cord considered these filters as snake oil.  They soon clogged, and restricted the flow even when new.   This is a non-pressurized cooling system, with coolant carrying aluminum heads, on a cast iron block.   Prestone 50/50 seems to  be the best coolant to use.   My buddy Lloyd, who was the head mechanic for the extensive Keller Collection in Petaluma (extensive Mercedes 540Ks, Bugatti, Hispano, Ferrari, etc....) has been conducting an on going experiment with all the different coolant products for many years.    These experiments are now housed deep in the bowels of the Academy of Arts main collector car facility in San Francisco, where Lloyd is the head mechanic for that 300 car fleet of Duesenburgs, Packards, Pierce Arrows, and even a Tucker.  He has many coolant filled cars with the same water pump part submerged.  This is just a static experiment, with no heat, or combustion fluctuations.  Just the same part, submerged in different examples of all the known concoctions for coolant.   
    The results are amazing.   Some have completely evaporated, others have grown fur, and some look like parts from the submerged Titanic.   The Prestone 50/50 constantly out performs all the others in this test.   Therefore, the entire fleet of the SF AofA, and of the Keller Collection, run this coolant/antifreeze.   I run it in all of my buggies as well.   I firstly cleanse the system with an over-the-counter radiator flush, then rinse it out again with distilled water, then employ the Prestone 50/50 straight; undiluted.   I do try and affix a sacrificial zinc pellet in the upper radiator tank though.   These I try to suspend from the radiator cap with the small stainless steel chain provided.   I ordered many of these little pellets when I had access to good ol'fashioned auto parts store.  I haven't attempted to source them lately though.

After that, it's occasional flushing & repeating the process, as one can't find Cord stuff at Safeway.

Merry Motoring, RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:30 AM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
More on the Prestone coolant results please. Thanks in advance Fred, 
Ray

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 07:40:50 AM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Red Fred
 

Hi Ken,
   I have a '97 F150 with a 4.6 that utilizes a plastic manifold.  Always scares me, as does the plastic radiator tanks.  Guess I'm just old fashioned.

Sorry for any confusion. the pre diluted Prestone 50/50 goes in undiluted!   Just use the product as it is, with NOTHING else.   I think I took a photo of the coolant experiment.  I'll try and find it.   It was a bigger difference than night & day by comparison.   

RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:50 AM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, is the Prestone 50/50 just AF & half water?  When you say undiluted, doesn't 50/50 imply that it's already half diluted with water versus concentrated, full strength AF?  Just want to make sure I understand what it is.  

When I was working with Ford's engine group in Dearborn, they were having awful troubles with the then new 3.8 L V6 - seems they had to be very careful during filling them with coolant and purging air -  if they weren't careful, as near as I could understand, if the new AF didn't completely wet the insides of the alum. heads, they'd get either bad corrosion or something nasty would happen. They had started having problems with the 3.8 L V6, which routinely lost head gaskets - I got some idea that the coolant had to react with the alum. by coating it completely to seal the material, or inhibit corrosion in some way, or damage would occur. maybe it was connected to the AF filling procedure.  Around that time period, I found a cherry Taurus 3.8 L V6 in a Mother Teresa donation lot, driven by a Pastor, was in very nice condition and price was cheap - tried it out in the lot - sounded fine, but had first to fill the radiator to test it - then found out why - sounded fine when fired up, so as I got out to pop the hood and look at it closely, saw water shooting out the exhaust!  Another blown head gasket!  This was back in late '90s

Ford was having some major problems with their engines re cooling - I had started working with them just as they were completing the launch of their first all glass-reinforced nylon V8 intake manifold for the 4.6L  engine.  The conversion from sandcast alum. to plastic lightened the car by 10 pounds - that sort of wt save can't be done anymore - not to mention the part probably cost them half the metal one, helped insulate the injectors from vapor lock due to the insulating nature of nylon so helped hot restart in ho climes, and they got free horsepower as the runners were molded against eutectic metal diecast cores, smooth as a port & polish job - free of charge!  It was a win-win-win-win for Ford, then they asked Dupont to drop the price of our material!  Thanks a lot!  

Only prob was - I had to inform the design team mgr that our FEA guys had found a smoking gun when they analyzed the CAD model - a high stress corner in the water crossover passage from one head to the other.  They had copied the alum. geometry straight - without taking into acct the material property differences between alum & nylon.  And they were unaware of very high frequency pressure pulses generated somehow inside the engine that wanted to crack the coolant passage at the sharp internal corner.  I had joined this project shortly before they finished the molds and it was too late to fix it, but the Ford mgr sure didn't like what I told him!  Hey, they hadn't consulted us at the start of the program, and they wanted to shoot the messenger.  I had just completed the launch of our plastic bodypanel program & had gone after the manifold as no one else had any experience in engine parts, yet I'd found Porsche had launched their plastic intake program on the '72 911 and was 20 yrs ahead of Detroit!  At least I'd found the weak link for them, but I had to become Ford's test center for fixing the part for the next 3 yrs, running my test rig 24/7 pressure-pulsing 12 parts simultaneously & finding ways to reduce the sharp stress-concentrating corner.  Long story short, the problem surfaced first  on the Crown Vic police car fleets, eventually becoming a class action lawsuit when consumers found the issue.  The final fix was converting the integral plastic water crossover to a separate alum. part, and the rest of the intake stayed nylon for all the other benefits.  

Later on, Ford had another cooling issue when new cars started losing engines due to overheating.  Seems somewhere along the manufacturing line, the diecasting molds for the alum. waterpump housings were having to be built up from erosion of the dies by welding and grinding them back to design shape.  Unfortunately some rebuilders didn't duplicate the orignal internal design, but blocked off flow to one bank of cylinders!  That side would overheat and blow the gasket, damaging the engine along the way - one of our reps Ford new company car lost its engine to this problem!  

And didn't GM switch to some new coolant called Dexcool?  I seem to recall something about that, but don't know why or what the problem was - do they still recommend Dexcool today?

Ken

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:03 AM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
I think that the highly sensitive system of the 810-812 Cord considered these filters as snake oil.  They soon clogged, and restricted the flow even when new.   This is a non-pressurized cooling system, with coolant carrying aluminum heads, on a cast iron block.   Prestone 50/50 seems to  be the best coolant to use.   My buddy Lloyd, who was the head mechanic for the extensive Keller Collection in Petaluma (extensive Mercedes 540Ks, Bugatti, Hispano, Ferrari, etc....) has been conducting an on going experiment with all the different coolant products for many years.    These experiments are now housed deep in the bowels of the Academy of Arts main collector car facility in San Francisco, where Lloyd is the head mechanic for that 300 car fleet of Duesenburgs, Packards, Pierce Arrows, and even a Tucker.  He has many coolant filled cars with the same water pump part submerged.  This is just a static experiment, with no heat, or combustion fluctuations.  Just the same part, submerged in different examples of all the known concoctions for coolant.   
    The results are amazing.   Some have completely evaporated, others have grown fur, and some look like parts from the submerged Titanic.   The Prestone 50/50 constantly out performs all the others in this test.   Therefore, the entire fleet of the SF AofA, and of the Keller Collection, run this coolant/antifreeze.   I run it in all of my buggies as well.   I firstly cleanse the system with an over-the-counter radiator flush, then rinse it out again with distilled water, then employ the Prestone 50/50 straight; undiluted.   I do try and affix a sacrificial zinc pellet in the upper radiator tank though.   These I try to suspend from the radiator cap with the small stainless steel chain provided.   I ordered many of these little pellets when I had access to good ol'fashioned auto parts store.  I haven't attempted to source them lately though.

After that, it's occasional flushing & repeating the process, as one can't find Cord stuff at Safeway.

Merry Motoring, RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:30 AM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
More on the Prestone coolant results please. Thanks in advance Fred, 
Ray

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 07:40:50 AM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale





Ken Nelson
 

Got a story on the plastic rad tanks also - I helped design the first one in the US - on the '82 Ford Escort as I recall. Had a complex angle corepull on the filler neck & we wanted to integrate the twistlock details, plus Ford was going to screw the fan shroud onto the bottom rad tank - I told them we could integrate bottom brackets that the shroud bottom could slide into & only need top fasteners, so we got rid ot two screws and the problems that could have happened with them - stripped threads, vibration of the shroud against the plastic tank - worked fine in production.  Reason they went to plastic rad tanks as Chasson in France had started them in Europe about 10 urs ahead of US again - they eliminated soldering and the lead involved.  Also eliminated leakers from bad solder joints and took wt and cost out.  

Ken

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 1:13 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
Hi Ken,
   I have a '97 F150 with a 4.6 that utilizes a plastic manifold.  Always scares me, as does the plastic radiator tanks.  Guess I'm just old fashioned.

Sorry for any confusion. the pre diluted Prestone 50/50 goes in undiluted!   Just use the product as it is, with NOTHING else.   I think I took a photo of the coolant experiment.  I'll try and find it.   It was a bigger difference than night & day by comparison.   

RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:50 AM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, is the Prestone 50/50 just AF & half water?  When you say undiluted, doesn't 50/50 imply that it's already half diluted with water versus concentrated, full strength AF?  Just want to make sure I understand what it is.  

When I was working with Ford's engine group in Dearborn, they were having awful troubles with the then new 3.8 L V6 - seems they had to be very careful during filling them with coolant and purging air -  if they weren't careful, as near as I could understand, if the new AF didn't completely wet the insides of the alum. heads, they'd get either bad corrosion or something nasty would happen. They had started having problems with the 3.8 L V6, which routinely lost head gaskets - I got some idea that the coolant had to react with the alum. by coating it completely to seal the material, or inhibit corrosion in some way, or damage would occur. maybe it was connected to the AF filling procedure.  Around that time period, I found a cherry Taurus 3.8 L V6 in a Mother Teresa donation lot, driven by a Pastor, was in very nice condition and price was cheap - tried it out in the lot - sounded fine, but had first to fill the radiator to test it - then found out why - sounded fine when fired up, so as I got out to pop the hood and look at it closely, saw water shooting out the exhaust!  Another blown head gasket!  This was back in late '90s

Ford was having some major problems with their engines re cooling - I had started working with them just as they were completing the launch of their first all glass-reinforced nylon V8 intake manifold for the 4.6L  engine.  The conversion from sandcast alum. to plastic lightened the car by 10 pounds - that sort of wt save can't be done anymore - not to mention the part probably cost them half the metal one, helped insulate the injectors from vapor lock due to the insulating nature of nylon so helped hot restart in ho climes, and they got free horsepower as the runners were molded against eutectic metal diecast cores, smooth as a port & polish job - free of charge!  It was a win-win-win-win for Ford, then they asked Dupont to drop the price of our material!  Thanks a lot!  

Only prob was - I had to inform the design team mgr that our FEA guys had found a smoking gun when they analyzed the CAD model - a high stress corner in the water crossover passage from one head to the other.  They had copied the alum. geometry straight - without taking into acct the material property differences between alum & nylon.  And they were unaware of very high frequency pressure pulses generated somehow inside the engine that wanted to crack the coolant passage at the sharp internal corner.  I had joined this project shortly before they finished the molds and it was too late to fix it, but the Ford mgr sure didn't like what I told him!  Hey, they hadn't consulted us at the start of the program, and they wanted to shoot the messenger.  I had just completed the launch of our plastic bodypanel program & had gone after the manifold as no one else had any experience in engine parts, yet I'd found Porsche had launched their plastic intake program on the '72 911 and was 20 yrs ahead of Detroit!  At least I'd found the weak link for them, but I had to become Ford's test center for fixing the part for the next 3 yrs, running my test rig 24/7 pressure-pulsing 12 parts simultaneously & finding ways to reduce the sharp stress-concentrating corner.  Long story short, the problem surfaced first  on the Crown Vic police car fleets, eventually becoming a class action lawsuit when consumers found the issue.  The final fix was converting the integral plastic water crossover to a separate alum. part, and the rest of the intake stayed nylon for all the other benefits.  

Later on, Ford had another cooling issue when new cars started losing engines due to overheating.  Seems somewhere along the manufacturing line, the diecasting molds for the alum. waterpump housings were having to be built up from erosion of the dies by welding and grinding them back to design shape.  Unfortunately some rebuilders didn't duplicate the orignal internal design, but blocked off flow to one bank of cylinders!  That side would overheat and blow the gasket, damaging the engine along the way - one of our reps Ford new company car lost its engine to this problem!  

And didn't GM switch to some new coolant called Dexcool?  I seem to recall something about that, but don't know why or what the problem was - do they still recommend Dexcool today?

Ken

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:03 AM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
I think that the highly sensitive system of the 810-812 Cord considered these filters as snake oil.  They soon clogged, and restricted the flow even when new.   This is a non-pressurized cooling system, with coolant carrying aluminum heads, on a cast iron block.   Prestone 50/50 seems to  be the best coolant to use.   My buddy Lloyd, who was the head mechanic for the extensive Keller Collection in Petaluma (extensive Mercedes 540Ks, Bugatti, Hispano, Ferrari, etc....) has been conducting an on going experiment with all the different coolant products for many years.    These experiments are now housed deep in the bowels of the Academy of Arts main collector car facility in San Francisco, where Lloyd is the head mechanic for that 300 car fleet of Duesenburgs, Packards, Pierce Arrows, and even a Tucker.  He has many coolant filled cars with the same water pump part submerged.  This is just a static experiment, with no heat, or combustion fluctuations.  Just the same part, submerged in different examples of all the known concoctions for coolant.   
    The results are amazing.   Some have completely evaporated, others have grown fur, and some look like parts from the submerged Titanic.   The Prestone 50/50 constantly out performs all the others in this test.   Therefore, the entire fleet of the SF AofA, and of the Keller Collection, run this coolant/antifreeze.   I run it in all of my buggies as well.   I firstly cleanse the system with an over-the-counter radiator flush, then rinse it out again with distilled water, then employ the Prestone 50/50 straight; undiluted.   I do try and affix a sacrificial zinc pellet in the upper radiator tank though.   These I try to suspend from the radiator cap with the small stainless steel chain provided.   I ordered many of these little pellets when I had access to good ol'fashioned auto parts store.  I haven't attempted to source them lately though.

After that, it's occasional flushing & repeating the process, as one can't find Cord stuff at Safeway.

Merry Motoring, RF.

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:30 AM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
More on the Prestone coolant results please. Thanks in advance Fred, 
Ray

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 07:40:50 AM PST, Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:


Hi Ken,
   There has been various repro heads available over the  year, and there still are.  Sounds like you are connected with the right guy.   Supposedly the heads out of Texas are to be avoided.   I've had a new, repro head crack on me before!

HNY, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:43 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Fred, I just read where a fellow redesigned the heads some yrs ago, using modern less corroding alloys, and the heads have 1/2 inch more interior height for more coolant than originals.   Story I just read off the ACD club forums was that the heads were pretty bad from the start - alloy prone to corrosion especially in contact with iron block of course.  And the increased thickness is even concourse acceptable with zero points off as they work so much better.  Before I came here in Nov I talke with George Arkelian who's an expert not far from me in Detroit - he showed me newly manufactured heads, a transmission he'd rebuilt and his place is full of blocks, all sorts of parts and he's a wealth of information - I think he's collaborating with Jim Obrien on the new transmission rebuilt manual that's in progress.  The forum seems to indicate that most of the heads were replaced over the yrs, and the new ones will have a small C cast into them to indicate the new design. Are you aware of these re-engineered heads?  
The newer alum. alloys after the war must've been much better, as Citroen started using alum hemiheads in '55 on the DS19, and over 58 yrs with those early engines and later ones with more hp, I've only had a corrosion problem with one head - which corroded thru the top into the valve gallery.  Turns out there is one high up hollow where cavitation seems to occur, but it was easily repaired by a shop widening the hole to get to thick metal around it, then making a plug & heliarcing it in - been on the road since for 30 yrs with no further problems.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 9:03 PM Red Fred <redfred47@...> wrote:
In Cord lore, there were many snake oil remedies for this.  Especially since the Cord employed aluminum heads early on.   Most were found to restrict coolant flow at an unacceptable rate.  I fashioned copper mesh screens in an effort to filter contaminants entering the radiators top tank.  It was soon clogged.  This was a newly record radiator, new water pump, and a freshly rebuilt engine done by Gail Shaw.  Everything was NEW & Fresh.  I now use a sacrificial zink pellet hung into the tank from stainless chain, affixed to the radiator cap.  It's amazing how fast these pellets are eaten up!
   BTW, We've found that Prestone 50/50 coolant is the best.   More on this later if anyone is interested.   The Cord probably offers some of the worse scenarios for a cooling system.

Cordially, RF.

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:53 PM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Hey thanks Bruce - that's exactly what a Cord owner did - rolled up some fine stainless screen into cones, stuffed one in each hose & removed a lot of grit, rust, whatever.   Will do when I get back if I can revive the engine, which at least turns over.  

Ken

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 8:11 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Guano filters are sold on Amazon.  Being cheap, I noticed it was like a tea strainer in a tube, so I cut a tea strainer (funnel like, and it's stainless) and jammed it inside the hose as it met the head.  Worked fine, saved some money.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 11:59:17 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


What type filters Oddrods?  Name? part no?  sources?

Thanks,
Ken



On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 8:57 PM oddrodstjets via groups.io <oddrods=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I installed coolant filters in my top radiator hises in my Jaguar XJS V12. They are strongly recommended in engines that might have a lot of crap in the system. Cleaned them out yearly and they do work well.


On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 Ken Nelson <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> wrote:
Guano guard - that's a new one for me Bruce!  Was it a toilet roll like the Frantz?  What was the filter element, as I can see putting one of those on a V8 to trap crud heading for the pump.  I've heard of putting screens inside the return hoses for old cars like Cords, to keep crap out of WP.

Ken

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 4:08 PM Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Scott was a strong advocate for Trihawks, and wanted to 'restart' the line, but I guess not.  He also was a distributor for Guano filters.  The Guano filter went between the engine block and the radiator top, it trapped an amazing amount of casing sand and wire bits that would otherwise run through the water pump.

Bruce

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 10:32:35 AM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


I had a '65 DS19 serviced by Scott Curtis yrs ago - he put Frantz filters on this car, and many others.  I have to say I never saw cleaner oil than in that car which I had to sell - to a guy in Holland.  Scott did all sorts of weird things, like mounting tiny closet lights everywhere in the eng. compartment so he could see without using a flashlight I'n guessing.  The filter had a gauge and did an amazing job even being a bypass filter.  So I have to give it credit for keeping the oil looking like new, when on these pre-filter engines, the oil was always pretty dark.  

Scott gave me my one and only ride - drive  in a Trihawk in the '80s - first he nearly broke my neck as he slammed the steering wheel side to side  so fast my head became a pendulum.  He took an offramp so fast I thought we'd go over the side but that R 5 front suspension and GS engine stuck like on rails.  Then he let me drive it - I went to take a hard, fast L turn across a 4 lane hwy, had to touch the brakes due to oncoming car, rear end slid a bit on centerline gravel, but car handled nicely - no sweat - and I really got a kick out of the handling of that beauty.  Wish I'd had the money and space - pocket rocket! 

Ken 

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 12:14 PM Dale <daleice@...> wrote:
For Dick T.
Thanks for the idea for using my old Franz filter that I took off of a Citroen DS!
I just got a plasma cutter and haven’t set it up yet…
Dale