Date   

Any classic Merc owners in this group

sujit roy
 

I've been told Merc back in the day used staked UJ for the drive lines. If this the case, where do you folks get them replaced? I'm in Cupertino
Early Triumph Stag's used a similar set up.

Here is a link to a UJ which can be used on a Stag. It's listed for  a Merc.


https://www.powertrainindustries.com/story/2851-24?catalog_table=dsp_ujoints


Sujit


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Geoff Kirkpatrick
 

I second Stephen's comment about "Legally..." In the dark days before I became an Arcaner I had a 1978 Mini 1000 which had been imported from Canada and licensed as a 1969 model via an ID plate riveted into the engine compartment. The real VIN was still totally visible in the modern left-front windshield corner though. That car could have been confiscated at any time, or an insurance claim denied, if a savvy copper or insurance investigator had known what they were looking at.  This subterfuge was, and maybe still is, rampant in the classic Mini community as a final-year car looks much like a first-year car to the uninitiated.


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Lawrence Rhodes
 

It is making more sense for car collectors to electrify classics and Kei cars. However Kei are not allowed as much for pollution as safety. There has to be some solution like fuel requirements (alcohol). That said electric is coming weather you like it or not. There is now a way to electrify some cars with the ability to restore to OEM. That said I predict a lot of trailer queens. Lawrence Rhodes
 https://www.theweek.co.uk/953215/future-proof-your-classic-porsche-911-with-an-electric-conversion


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Stephen Cooper
 

Unfortunately guys, here in mighty California you cannot license what was made at a time when smog controls were mandated and your vehicle has none..........one that will pass CARB's requirements anyways........the Kei trucks are therefore impossible to legally license here in sunny Calif.  Need I stress the word "legally" as I too have seen the odd one running around and wonder what subterfuge went on to get it plated in this state.  Keep in mind that no matter who owns it when CARB and/or CHP become aware of its illegal status on our roads, confiscation looms in its future not to mention possible prosecution for fraud. 
Once upon a time I had a fully licensed 1987 Citroen 2CV legally plated here in California.  I was almost floored when our friend on Bird Avenue told me he had spent a small fortune adding catalytic converters to his 1990 2CV before the "state" finally gave in and allowed him to license it.  Please correct me if my foggy old memory has got something wrong.

--
Today is the first day of the rest of your life


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Matthew Spielberg
 

Almost no problem getting them registered in California, but expensive. There were 6 licenses issued to California certify them.

Now only one licensee in the state. George charges what he wants to charge.

Skyline GTR was $10k, now about $14K. I do not have current figures, but Cappuccino about $7k, Figuaro started at $4500,  now $5 to $6K.


And no, just because licensed out of state, still needs to be "California certified" to register.

On 2/2/2022 4:54 PM, Fred Cisin wrote:
The listing says "title status: clean"
But neither it, nor the Pajero that he also has listed, have license plates.
Could there be a problem getting them registered for street use?


On Wed, 2 Feb 2022, Keith Murphy via groups.io wrote:


https://bellingham.craigslist.org/ctd/d/happy-valley-1996-daihatsu-midget-ii/7440989954.html


--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Fred Cisin
 

One other concept vehicle, . . .

four wheel, if you count the NECESSARY outrigger training wheels, was the Joan Claybrook "SAFETY" motorcycle. Front wheel drive, rear wheel steering, and, until they added the training wheels, nobody ever successfully rode it without injury.


Re: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Christopher Freitas
 

One other American front wheel drive concept car developed in the early 1930's was Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion - and it had rear steering too! First shown publicly at the 1933 world's fair in Chicago - so prior to the launch of the Citroen Traction Avant also... 

image.png

Three different prototypes were built - all using ford flat head V8s in the back and with rear steering. 

Two replicas have been made - one by the Lane Auto Museum of the first prototype, and one in England based on the second prototype, which still exists and is at the auto museum in Reno, NV.  The first and third prototype were lost.   

image.png
image.png



On Thu, Feb 3, 2022 at 9:20 AM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Terrific info Lou - I had thought of the Cugnot but......  Had never seen the Selden but heard of the case - Thanks!

Ken

On Thu, Feb 3, 2022 at 1:34 AM Lou via groups.io <c1937=znet.com@groups.io> wrote:
   
   
   
    One of the reasons Ford was able to evade the Selden patent is    
that Ford was rear drive and Selden was front wheel drive,   
In French, Traction Avant.                          
   
   
   
       
   
   
    But the French had Front drive beat by over a century.       
Hardly mass produced, as only one was made and the    
Cugnot crashed on it's maiden voyage.        
   
    Power Steering hadn't been invented yet.            
Lou                 
   
   
   
        
   
   
   
On 2/2/2022 10:21 AM, Ken Nelson wrote:
Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>


THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube

Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>

Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

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--


Re: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Ken Nelson
 

Terrific info Lou - I had thought of the Cugnot but......  Had never seen the Selden but heard of the case - Thanks!

Ken

On Thu, Feb 3, 2022 at 1:34 AM Lou via groups.io <c1937=znet.com@groups.io> wrote:
   
   
   
    One of the reasons Ford was able to evade the Selden patent is    
that Ford was rear drive and Selden was front wheel drive,   
In French, Traction Avant.                          
   
   
   
       
   
   
    But the French had Front drive beat by over a century.       
Hardly mass produced, as only one was made and the    
Cugnot crashed on it's maiden voyage.        
   
    Power Steering hadn't been invented yet.            
Lou                 
   
   
   
        
   
   
   
On 2/2/2022 10:21 AM, Ken Nelson wrote:
Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>


THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube

Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>

Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

© 2022 Petersen Automotive Museum. All rights reserved.


Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Lou
 

   
   
   
    One of the reasons Ford was able to evade the Selden patent is    
that Ford was rear drive and Selden was front wheel drive,   
In French, Traction Avant.                          
   
   
   
       
   
   
    But the French had Front drive beat by over a century.       
Hardly mass produced, as only one was made and the    
Cugnot crashed on it's maiden voyage.        
   
    Power Steering hadn't been invented yet.            
Lou                 
   
   
   
        
   
   
   
On 2/2/2022 10:21 AM, Ken Nelson wrote:

Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>



Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube

Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>

Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

© 2022 Petersen Automotive Museum. All rights reserved.


Re: 1958 BMW Isetta 300

Ken Nelson
 

Nice Miles!  


On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 10:28 PM 600miles <z600miles@...> wrote:
Everything is available. I like to get my parts in Germany from Gosbert,
I bought my Isetta in Santa Clara 2 years ago and got it driving Aug
last year, as is, only restored the mechanicals so far and don't plan a
repaint, I like it as is. I did my own flex joint (guibo) upgrade using
new flex joints I bought from Gosbert and I made my own extension link
saving $$ on the current kit. I used a modified VW throttle cable
costing only $6 instead of the complete unit costing $60. My seat was
missing but made my own, Some BMW R26 motorcycle parts fit saving big $$
on some items. If you aren't mechanically inclined you will spend a lot
there.

Miles Chappell

1958 Isetta 300






Re: 1958 BMW Isetta 300

600miles
 

Everything is available. I like to get my parts in Germany from Gosbert, I bought my Isetta in Santa Clara 2 years ago and got it driving Aug last year, as is, only restored the mechanicals so far and don't plan a repaint, I like it as is. I did my own flex joint (guibo) upgrade using new flex joints I bought from Gosbert and I made my own extension link saving $$ on the current kit. I used a modified VW throttle cable costing only $6 instead of the complete unit costing $60. My seat was missing but made my own, Some BMW R26 motorcycle parts fit saving big $$ on some items. If you aren't mechanically inclined you will spend a lot there.

Miles Chappell

1958 Isetta 300


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Fred Cisin
 

That's good.

Unfortunately, I'm in California, and it might not be as sane.

On Wed, 2 Feb 2022, Christopher Freitas wrote:

I have a couple of friends with Japanese minivans (Subaru Sambar's
etc.) and other RHD imports (Land Cruisers, Delicas etc.) - They are
pretty easy to register here in WA state as long as they are 25 years
and older and have the correct import docs.

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 4:54 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:

The listing says "title status: clean"
But neither it, nor the Pajero that he also has listed, have license
plates.
Could there be a problem getting them registered for street use?


On Wed, 2 Feb 2022, Keith Murphy via groups.io wrote:


https://bellingham.craigslist.org/ctd/d/happy-valley-1996-daihatsu-midget-ii/7440989954.html




--
Christopher

Christopher64@...


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Christopher Freitas
 

I have a couple of friends with Japanese minivans (Subaru Sambar's
etc.) and other RHD imports (Land Cruisers, Delicas etc.) - They are
pretty easy to register here in WA state as long as they are 25 years
and older and have the correct import docs.

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 4:54 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:

The listing says "title status: clean"
But neither it, nor the Pajero that he also has listed, have license
plates.
Could there be a problem getting them registered for street use?


On Wed, 2 Feb 2022, Keith Murphy via groups.io wrote:


https://bellingham.craigslist.org/ctd/d/happy-valley-1996-daihatsu-midget-ii/7440989954.html



--
Christopher

Christopher64@...


Re: More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Fred Cisin
 

The listing says "title status: clean"
But neither it, nor the Pajero that he also has listed, have license plates.
Could there be a problem getting them registered for street use?


Re: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Dick Tuttle
 

While the Cugnot was surely the first front wheel drive vehicle, three others, Americans at that, were early pioneers.  George Seldon of the patent fame, designed a front wheel drive with transverse engine which no futurist if his time could imagine would become the standard configuration most cars, despite the long dominance of the systeme Panhard.  Walter Christie was a genius of a pioneer in front wheel drive in the early 1900s.  He also designed an army tank suspension that allowed tanks to go over 40 mph.  Our stodgy US military wouldn't buy it but the Germans and Russians snapped up the concept and made the best tanks of WW2 using it.  Racing car builder Harry Miller built FWD track racers in the late 20s and early 30s that proved successful as well.  I think that practical front wheel drive came with the development of the CV joint by Rzeppa and Citroen.

When I was 17 I worked as a mechanic for a Lloyd dealer.  One if the salesmen to tout front wheel drive had an illustration of a fellow with a wheelbarrow trying to mount a couple if steps.  Pushing got him nowhere but turning around and pulling it became a piece of cake,  Ah, front wheel drive!

Dick Tuttle








-----Original Message-----
From: Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich@...>
To: arcaneautos@groups.io <arcaneautos@groups.io>; ArcaneAutos@groups.io <ArcaneAutos@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 3:37 pm
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

On further research it seems Ruxtons were known for losing wheels. They have left and right hand lugs, like old Chyslers, but I believe the problem is with the taper on the stub axle. Don't think they were handed. Maybe the material was too soft or the torque spec too low. Will have to look into it more.

Ray

On Wednesday, February 2, 2022, 12:37:56 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


So R & L hand threads on wrong side like I heard some Chrysler prods had way back?  Or were they knockoff splines??

Ken

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 3:30 PM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
An interesting fact about Ruxtons. If you accidentally swap the front hubs and fit them on the wrong sides of the car, the wheels DO come off. A few years back there was a beauty entered in the Pebble Beach Concours and on the Tour D'Elegance drive on the Thursday preceding it lost a front wheel on the stretch to Bixby Bridge. Embarassing for the owner I am sure. Wonder how the conversation with the restorer went afterwards?

Ray

On Wednesday, February 2, 2022, 12:09:37 PM PST, Christopher Freitas <christopher64@...> wrote:


Interesting - according to wikipedia, the Ruxton body was designed by Joseph Ledwinka (a cousin of Hans Ledwinka of Tatra) when he worked at Budd Manufacturing - which had sold a license for their body stamping system to Citroen in 1923.  So lots of connections there for sure.  Joseph also worked with Porsche on the early VW Beetle design as well.   

The Cord L-29 apparently beat the Ruxton to market by a few months as the first production front wheel drive car - but neither it nor the Ruxton where produced in that substantial of numbers - Cord built around 4,400 of the L-29 between 1929 and 1932.  

DKW built a front wheel drive car with a transverse engine called the F1 (1931-1932 with 4000 produced) and then the F2 (1932-35 with 17,000 produced) and so should also be recognized as well.  

There were also two Alder models in Germany, called the "Trumpf" and "Trumpf JR", released in 1931 which were also front wheel drive. 

The Citroen Traction Avant started production in 1934. It was the first steel monocoque front wheel drive car though.  

  

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 10:21 AM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>


THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>
Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

© 2022 Petersen Automotive Museum. All rights reserved.


--


More used small trucks from Japan being sold in the USA - drive on the road?

Keith Murphy
 


Re: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Raymond Nierlich
 

On further research it seems Ruxtons were known for losing wheels. They have left and right hand lugs, like old Chyslers, but I believe the problem is with the taper on the stub axle. Don't think they were handed. Maybe the material was too soft or the torque spec too low. Will have to look into it more.

Ray

On Wednesday, February 2, 2022, 12:37:56 PM PST, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


So R & L hand threads on wrong side like I heard some Chrysler prods had way back?  Or were they knockoff splines??

Ken

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 3:30 PM Raymond Nierlich via groups.io <ray_nierlich=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
An interesting fact about Ruxtons. If you accidentally swap the front hubs and fit them on the wrong sides of the car, the wheels DO come off. A few years back there was a beauty entered in the Pebble Beach Concours and on the Tour D'Elegance drive on the Thursday preceding it lost a front wheel on the stretch to Bixby Bridge. Embarassing for the owner I am sure. Wonder how the conversation with the restorer went afterwards?

Ray

On Wednesday, February 2, 2022, 12:09:37 PM PST, Christopher Freitas <christopher64@...> wrote:


Interesting - according to wikipedia, the Ruxton body was designed by Joseph Ledwinka (a cousin of Hans Ledwinka of Tatra) when he worked at Budd Manufacturing - which had sold a license for their body stamping system to Citroen in 1923.  So lots of connections there for sure.  Joseph also worked with Porsche on the early VW Beetle design as well.   

The Cord L-29 apparently beat the Ruxton to market by a few months as the first production front wheel drive car - but neither it nor the Ruxton where produced in that substantial of numbers - Cord built around 4,400 of the L-29 between 1929 and 1932.  

DKW built a front wheel drive car with a transverse engine called the F1 (1931-1932 with 4000 produced) and then the F2 (1932-35 with 17,000 produced) and so should also be recognized as well.  

There were also two Alder models in Germany, called the "Trumpf" and "Trumpf JR", released in 1931 which were also front wheel drive. 

The Citroen Traction Avant started production in 1934. It was the first steel monocoque front wheel drive car though.  

  

On Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 10:21 AM Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:
Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>


THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>
Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

© 2022 Petersen Automotive Museum. All rights reserved.



--


Re: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Craig Parada
 

I won’t lie, it’s all out there: Miller, if you’re looking for one-off automobiles, and Cord for production vehicles

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front-wheel_drive#1920–1930

On Feb 2, 2022, at 10:21, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>


Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>
Petersen Automotive Museum
A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

323-930-2277
www.petersen.org
www.carstories.com

In an effort to remain relevant, our visitors are automatically added to the Petersen newsletter to receive notifications on Museum events and updates. This email was sent to citbuff@... because you either subscribed to the Museum newsletter or purchased a ticket online.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

© 2022 Petersen Automotive Museum. All rights reserved.


Re: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!

Matthew Spielberg
 

Reminds me a little of the Bond. Steer by directing the engine drive train as a unit.

On 2/2/2022 12:39 PM, Craig Parada wrote:
Joseph Cugnot’s famous 1770 steam-powered vehicle 


On Feb 2, 2022, at 10:21, Ken Nelson <citbuff@...> wrote:


Well well, and here I thought Citroen invented production FWD!  And what's really impressive about this Ruxton bit is the push/pull shifter which may be where the 2CV got its cueball!  So - is there any other obscure marque which REALLY was the first FWD vehicle?  Anyone? 
And please don't anyone suggest the horse! 

Ken

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Petersen Automotive Museum <pam@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 2, 2022 at 12:13 PM
Subject: Video Premiere: Pioneering Front Wheel Drive!
To: <citbuff@...>



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Video Premiere:
THE FIRST American Front Wheel Drive Production Car

Today, we're picking a very special car out of the Petersen Vault presented by Hagerty - the Ruxton Runabout. This classic car from the Petersen's own car collection is not only rare but extremely forward-thinking.

The innovative Ruxton was one of the first series-produced, front-wheel-drive cars built in America. Novel for the day, the drive system did not require the use of a traditional driveshaft, which allowed designers to build a car that was so low it did not need running boards. Ruxtons were built at both the Moon automobile plant in St. Louis, Missouri, and the Kissel automobile plant in Hartford, Wisconsin, but the firm was not well-financed and failed after only about 500 cars were built. This is one of just four roadsters known to survive and is powered by a 100 horsepower, straight-eight engine. Though unusual, the light raspberry and orchid colors are correct for the era.
WATCH NOW >>

Petersen Automotive Museum
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www.petersen.org
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1958 BMW Isetta 600

Chris S
 

Today I found this group via Dale Ice. Thank you 
Link to listing
https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/659064575229484/?referralSurface=messenger_lightspeed_banner&referralCode=messenger_banner

I found a Isetta for sale in San Francisco, wondering on what I should know, what are the availability for parts where do I start. Its a bit rough but drives and looks nice. 
As of 2/2/2022 I am getting into the dry ice cleaning business and thought this would be a good candidate to start restoring, I will be taking a look at this once they respond, as Dale told me the Diff is a weak point and the Guibo Rubber joints could be bad.

anything helps thank you Dale Ice again!

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