Date   

Annual (sort of) gathering, business meeting and Road Kill Brunch. Save the date.

Matthew Spielberg
 

Please mark your calendars, and start working on pot luck contributions.

This will be the last gathering at the HSC (Hayward Substitute Clubhouse) Our host will be changing locations.

Full bar will be in operation. Possibly fire up the grill, but the kitchen, range and ovens will be available.

Saturday September 18, 10 AM or so until afternoon.

31640 Hayman St, Hayward.


We will be following CDC guidelines, whatever they happen to be at the time. I am not going to be the vaccine police, but if you have not been shot, please wear a mask. And maybe even if you have.

Note that the cars will remain outside, due to lack of proof of vaccination status.


If you can not bring your Arcane vehicle, bring pictures, bring sotries.

Bring ideas for future runs. Runs to other folks collections, runs on beautiful back roads. Runs.

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Free BMW engine on NextDoor

David Russel
 


Saw this and thought someone on the list might be interested.  It is in San Jose and was left behind 6 years ago when the condo it was stored at was sold. "new" owners want to get rid of it.  They don't know anything of its history or condition.

BMW E90 3.0L model N51 engine
Not sure if NextDoor link works if not a member but here it is:


Hope photo below of very clean engine come thru



If you want the engine and can't make contact with the Donor let me know as she and I have made contact so it will be easy to put you in touch.
David


Re: referral needed

Matthew Spielberg
 

Actually I have been using 3M weatherstrip adhesive, in black, because it is a better color match for the hair on my forearm.

On 8/4/2021 7:17 AM, Bill Simpkins via groups.io wrote:
Weatherstrip adhesive....why contact cement??

On Wednesday, August 4, 2021, 12:46:50 AM PDT, Larry Sacks <lmsacks@...> wrote:


Ouch... It's been awhile since I ripped arm hair out of my arm by the roots.  I suspect it's a bit longer than having iit singed off from a recalcitrant gas BBQ grill where the ignitor had failed and long matches were employed to light said grill. 

Larry

On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 3:11 PM Matthew Spielberg <mspielberg@...> wrote:

I would be willing to pay good money to someone with real experience
with application of weatherstripping. And experience with contact cement.

I have not had the best of luck with it.


And as an aside, does anyone have any idea how long it takes for arm
hair to regrow, once ripped out by the roots?

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250






-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Stretch Corvair

Lou
 

   
   
   
It sounds like that Lakewood no longer has it's pancake 6.           
   
   
   
   

On 8/4/2021 8:01 AM, Lawrence Rhodes wrote:
Here's an off road recovery vehicle based on a Corvair unibody. https://youtu.be/OVipNwtFtiA Lawrence Rhodes
   
   
   
   
   


Re: Stretch Corvair

Matthew Spielberg
 

With traction control and four wheel drive. 

I do not remember that on the option list.

Sent from my IBM Selectric

On Aug 4, 2021, at 8:01 AM, Lawrence Rhodes <primobassoon@...> wrote:

Here's an off road recovery vehicle based on a Corvair unibody. https://youtu.be/OVipNwtFtiA Lawrence Rhodes


Re: Stretch Corvair

Lawrence Rhodes
 

Here's an off road recovery vehicle based on a Corvair unibody. https://youtu.be/OVipNwtFtiA Lawrence Rhodes


Re: referral needed

Bill Simpkins
 

Weatherstrip adhesive....why contact cement??

On Wednesday, August 4, 2021, 12:46:50 AM PDT, Larry Sacks <lmsacks@...> wrote:


Ouch... It's been awhile since I ripped arm hair out of my arm by the roots.  I suspect it's a bit longer than having iit singed off from a recalcitrant gas BBQ grill where the ignitor had failed and long matches were employed to light said grill. 

Larry

On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 3:11 PM Matthew Spielberg <mspielberg@...> wrote:

I would be willing to pay good money to someone with real experience
with application of weatherstripping. And experience with contact cement.

I have not had the best of luck with it.


And as an aside, does anyone have any idea how long it takes for arm
hair to regrow, once ripped out by the roots?

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250







Re: referral needed

Larry Sacks
 

Ouch... It's been awhile since I ripped arm hair out of my arm by the roots.  I suspect it's a bit longer than having iit singed off from a recalcitrant gas BBQ grill where the ignitor had failed and long matches were employed to light said grill. 

Larry


On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 3:11 PM Matthew Spielberg <mspielberg@...> wrote:

I would be willing to pay good money to someone with real experience
with application of weatherstripping. And experience with contact cement.

I have not had the best of luck with it.


And as an aside, does anyone have any idea how long it takes for arm
hair to regrow, once ripped out by the roots?

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250







Re: VW 147

Lou
 

   
   
   
Hi Matt,               
    Thanks for confirmation about Postal vehicle.        
I notice it has louvers under front fenders for air   
conditioning.   It also appears to have room for   
many more gauges than my square back.              
        Thanks,            Lou           
   
   
   
   
   
   

On 8/3/2021 12:57 PM, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

VW made for the postal service, used in Germany and by the Swiss.

 

18th of March 2005

The English website is done!


For our international visitors the website is now usable even without online translation or dictionaries : www.vw-fridolin-ig.de/en/ :-)
On 8/3/2021 12:22 PM, Lou via groups.io wrote:


   
   
   
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to       
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by   a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese       
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou                   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
On 8/3/2021 10:15 AM, Fred Cisin wrote:
Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the "wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage, the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control (which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom. In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank. Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred             cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David






-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: referral needed

Ken Nelson
 

Owy!!!!


On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 3:11 PM Matthew Spielberg <mspielberg@...> wrote:

I would be willing to pay good money to someone with real experience
with application of weatherstripping. And experience with contact cement.

I have not had the best of luck with it.


And as an aside, does anyone have any idea how long it takes for arm
hair to regrow, once ripped out by the roots?

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250







Re: Stretch Corvair

Matthew Spielberg
 

And I recall that a limo maker did a first class stretch of a first generation Honda Accord.

As I recall, it was somewhat down on power.

On 8/3/2021 3:23 PM, Bruce Dewing via groups.io wrote:
Fred,
Here's a stretch AZ600.  The Mings family built it.  Mr Mings said it was useful when picking up people from the airport.  Should of shot some paint.
Bruce


On Tuesday, August 3, 2021, 10:15:42 AM PDT, Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:


Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight
doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of
the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The
result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long
one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding
side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an
international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive
tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even
the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was
windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other
variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the
"wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones
with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement
of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and
in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage,
the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and
ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the
gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control
(which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the
bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom.
In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank.
Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position
valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the
two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH
guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear
wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred            cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

> No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
> took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
> decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.
>
> David





-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Stretch Corvair

Fred Cisin
 

In the early 1970s, I had a model 211 (minimal windowless, on which I put side doors from one with windows), but REALLY wanted a model 215 (double doors on BOTH sides. I found a model 213 (double doors on the left) and considered splicing, but common sense stopped THAT stupid idea.
I found a 1958?, stuck out in the woods, model 215 in Mendocino, and towed it down. I never got around to building the full project. I wanted the wide back door (from 1963 on) and cut the entire back end off of a wreck, but, once again, never got around to finishing it.


Other projects that I never made much progress on included wanting to put a Honda 600 drivetrain into the BACK of a Honda 600. That would be a total of 1200cc 4 wheel drive, and I was going to try to provide VERY LIMITED use of the rear steering (for parking, etc. since with the extra weight, I would no longer be able to heft the rear end over). At the time, Fremont racetrack had an "air cooled 1200cc anything goes" category! But, long before I could possibly complete a car, they changed that to "1200cc VW, anything goes".

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, Lou wrote:

   
   
   
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to  
    
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
[IMAGE]   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by  
a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO
vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese   
   
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou


Re: Stretch Corvair

Bruce Dewing
 

Fred,
Here's a stretch AZ600.  The Mings family built it.  Mr Mings said it was useful when picking up people from the airport.  Should of shot some paint.
Bruce


On Tuesday, August 3, 2021, 10:15:42 AM PDT, Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:


Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight
doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of
the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The
result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long
one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding
side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an
international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive
tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even
the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was
windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other
variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the
"wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones
with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement
of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and
in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage,
the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and
ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the
gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control
(which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the
bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom.
In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank.
Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position
valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the
two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH
guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear
wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred            cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

> No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
> took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
> decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.
>
> David






Re: Stretch Corvair

Fred Cisin
 

I also thought type 3 on first glance at the front end, but it is clearly labelled Typ 147, which is a Karmann Ghia variation!
(Karmann did a lot of car body design for VW, apparently including the type 3)

There is another Karmman "variant" around, with a few in the area, the model 34.
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/archives/info/historyt34.php
Which is a type 3, but with a body that is reminiscent of a Corvair. Refered to by some local mechanics as "Chinese Deviant" (the slant of the headlight brows and "deviant" as a derogatory reference to "variant")

This car looks a helluva lot like "The Squirrel Car" (a reference to handling problems), which used to be parked on Grayson near 6th Street. That was a one-off home project built by Dave Hill (Movement Motors on Murray Street in the early 1970s), a VW, cut up and the back replaced by the back of a VW bus. He said that it was an idea that he came up with while out of action for a while. But, this is clearly a commercially produced car just like what he tried to build. (a somewhat inevitable idea to have a Bug front and a Bus rear)

Some trivial GOOGLE'ing comes up with
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_147_Kleinlieferwagen
which says early to mid 1960s to mid 1970s, and does indeed, confirm that it was designed for the post office.
It says engine, trans, etc. were Bug.
It had a nickname of "Fridolin"
6139 produced, 200 still around.

http://www.vw-fridolin-ig.de/en/content/
is a special interest group.
The first picture in their gallery clearly show the back end to be completely a slightly scaled down VW bus (type 2).


A few people have gotten flack for having right-hand drive vehicles, from ignorant DMV clerks and even border patrol. Anybody who has a right hand drive vehicle has a social obligation to put a toy steering wheel on the left, and have a large dog sit there. Especially going through the bay bridge toll plaza!

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred cisin@xenosoft.com

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, Lou via groups.io wrote:
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to  
    
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
[IMAGE]   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by  
a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO
vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese   
   
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou


referral needed

Matthew Spielberg
 

I would be willing to pay good money to someone with real experience with application of weatherstripping. And experience with contact cement.

I have not had the best of luck with it.


And as an aside, does anyone have any idea how long it takes for arm hair to regrow, once ripped out by the roots?

--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Stretch Corvair

Matthew Spielberg
 

VW made for the postal service, used in Germany and by the Swiss.

 

18th of March 2005

The English website is done!


For our international visitors the website is now usable even without online translation or dictionaries : www.vw-fridolin-ig.de/en/ :-)
On 8/3/2021 12:22 PM, Lou via groups.io wrote:


   
   
   
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to       
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by   a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese       
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou                   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
On 8/3/2021 10:15 AM, Fred Cisin wrote:
Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the "wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage, the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control (which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom. In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank. Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred             cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David






-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Stretch Corvair

adrian cockcroft
 

The first video I ever uploaded to YouTube is the inside view of a short microbus wheelie recorded over 14 years ago at the Arcane annual Roadkill Potluck in SF

Adrian 

On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 12:22 PM Lou via groups.io <c1937=znet.com@groups.io> wrote:
   
   
   
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to       
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by   a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese       
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou                   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
On 8/3/2021 10:15 AM, Fred Cisin wrote:
Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the "wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage, the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control (which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom. In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank. Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred             cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David







Re: Stretch Corvair

Lou
 

   
   
   
Hi Fred,               
    Great tutorial on Kraut Can Vans.  I realize you used to       
specialize in VWs before Hondas.   So what do you know   
about the pictured type 3?       
   
   
    Due to the sliding side doors, I'm guessing they were used by   a
Post office.    But where?  The US has right hand drive PO vehicles   
so mail can be delivered on rural routes.   British and Japanese       
countries outlaw all Left hand drive vehicles.          
        Lou                   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

On 8/3/2021 10:15 AM, Fred Cisin wrote:
Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight doors.  And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of the freight doors.  Then swap the pieces and weld them together.  The result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding side door.  Stretch conversions after that were rare.  Also, an international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side.  Model 211 was windowless.  Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides.  Other variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the "wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones with little skylights above the doors, etc.  If you look at the placement of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage, the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the gas tank valve.  VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control (which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom. In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank. Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position valve.  But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed.  But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred             cisin@...

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David







Re: Stretch Corvair

Fred Cisin
 

Possibly simple avoidance of waste, depending on HOW the strestch is made.


There used to be people making longer and shorter VW bus conversions.
They would take a VW bus, and cut it off right behind the side freight doors. And they would take another one and cut it off right in front of the freight doors. Then swap the pieces and weld them together. The result was one very short VW bus without side freight doors, and one long one with two sets of freight doors.

In 1968, the bus went from swinging double doors on the side to a sliding side door. Stretch conversions after that were rare. Also, an international trade battle involving chickens resulting in punitive tarrifs on small "commercial" vehicles, so ones without windows, and even the VW pickup truck became rare.

Prior to 1968, the VW bus had a double door on the side. Model 211 was windowless. Model 215 (rare) had double doors on both sides. Other variants included special delivery models with the side doors on the "wrong" side, sliding doors before 1968, swinging doors after 1968, ones with little skylights above the doors, etc. If you look at the placement of the hinges of the freight door, early ones had high upper hinges, and in about 1959? the upper hinge was moved down almost to the belt ridge.

The conversion required lengthening, or shortening, the gearshift linkage, the throttle cable, brake lines, wiring, the heater control cables and ducts, etc.
For ones from the 1950s, shoke cable, and cable operated control for the gas tank valve. VW NEVER had a "reserve" tank; instead, the control (which was cable operated in the bus) controlled the pickup valve at the bottom of the tank, which normally took gas a little bit above the bottom. In "RESERVE" position, it sucked the crud from the bottom of the tank. Once they put in a gas gauge (1961?), they discontinued the two position valve. But the fitting was the same, so it was possible to put the two position valve on a tank with guage sender, to have a tank with BOTH guage and valve.


I've seen a Honda N600 shortened, and another modified for a single rear wheel, and one with a wooden flatbed. But, I never saw a lengthened one.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred cisin@xenosoft.com

On Tue, 3 Aug 2021, David Russel wrote:

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David


Re: Stretch Corvair

David Russel
 

No photos but back in school days, late 1960’s, there was a guy who
took the opposite approach and shortened at least 1 corvair by a
decent amount. It had no trouble popping wheelies.

David

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Aug 3, 2021, at 8:55 AM, Dale <daleice@mcn.org> wrote:

Could be celebrity limo for the head Gazumcum of the Fake-a-loo…
Dale



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