Date   

Re: JDM fans - is an Infiniti J30t worth resurrecting?

Ken Nelson
 

Another thought Geoff - have you pulled a plug cable, stuck another plug in it and laid it on a grounding point on the engine to see if it sparks when ENG is cranked?  If it sparks then spraying brakekleen in air inlet should get it to fire.   Beyond that maybe injectors aren’t working or fuel pump.  

Ken


On Jun 27, 2021, at 7:29 PM, Bruce Dewing via groups.io <tralfaz42@...> wrote:

Geoff,
Have you tried using ether spray?  Have you done a compression test?
Bruce

On Sunday, June 27, 2021, 12:14:42 PM PDT, Geoff Kirkpatrick via groups.io <britcarnut@...> wrote:


I've cleaned the Infiniti up a bit and have attempted to start it, without success. It cranks nicely but there's nothing resembling an attempt at catching. I'm not accustomed to working on cars that have fuel injection, coil packs, ECUs, and all that newfangled stuff from the 1980s on up. It's been at least seven or eight years since the car last ran. Is there perhaps some priming of the fuel pump or the injection system needed? Are there any other "Semi-Modern cars for Idiots" suggestions for where I might look? I'm torn on what to do with this car. It turns out it was never put on non-op so the DMV wants $700+ if someone should try to register it. Its market value even if it's up and running is negligible. But it's fundamentally a nice and rather rare car. The title is lost and I'm on my own, having to do a lien sale just to get the title so I can dispose of it somehow. <IMG_9859.JPG><IMG_9856.JPG><IMG_9855.JPG><IMG_9854.JPG><IMG_9853.JPG>
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Re: JDM fans - is an Infiniti J30t worth resurrecting?

Bruce Dewing
 

Geoff,
Have you tried using ether spray?  Have you done a compression test?
Bruce

On Sunday, June 27, 2021, 12:14:42 PM PDT, Geoff Kirkpatrick via groups.io <britcarnut@...> wrote:


I've cleaned the Infiniti up a bit and have attempted to start it, without success. It cranks nicely but there's nothing resembling an attempt at catching. I'm not accustomed to working on cars that have fuel injection, coil packs, ECUs, and all that newfangled stuff from the 1980s on up. It's been at least seven or eight years since the car last ran. Is there perhaps some priming of the fuel pump or the injection system needed? Are there any other "Semi-Modern cars for Idiots" suggestions for where I might look? I'm torn on what to do with this car. It turns out it was never put on non-op so the DMV wants $700+ if someone should try to register it. Its market value even if it's up and running is negligible. But it's fundamentally a nice and rather rare car. The title is lost and I'm on my own, having to do a lien sale just to get the title so I can dispose of it somehow. 


Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Stephen Cooper
 

Interesting conversation.  Since I've been driving a few months short of 60 years, I can certainly speak from experience.  For the record, I have yet to wear out/nor replace any clutches.
I too am from the camp wherein my father taught me to "use your gears to slow down because gasoline is cheaper than replacing your brakes".

Now then, I just paid $3.85 per gallon to fill up yesterday and that's roughly 20 times as much as when the lesson was given.

However back in high school I earned $1.50 per hour working at Foster's Freeze. While the average dealer's non-supervisory workers made $2.16 per hour out here in the West during 1962.

According to :https://autoservicecosts.com/clutch-cost/..........the average cost to replace a clutch today is $843...
And the average cost of a brake job today would be $270-$375 per axle according to : https://ricksfreeautorepairadvice.com/consumers-guide-to-brake-job-cost/.

So, based on my history of never having had any clutches wear out in 60 years of owning many many vehicles (as many of you in the club know, I have a history of BUYING  vehicles but seldom selling them) but I have had a couple of brake jobs,

I'd say my dad's advice was good.  Even at $3.85 per gallon, gas is still cheaper than a brake job and I have NEVER  had a case of "brake-fade" while coming down a long grade on a hot day.
Average
_


Re: JDM fans - is an Infiniti J30t worth resurrecting?

Geoff Kirkpatrick
 

I've cleaned the Infiniti up a bit and have attempted to start it, without success. It cranks nicely but there's nothing resembling an attempt at catching. I'm not accustomed to working on cars that have fuel injection, coil packs, ECUs, and all that newfangled stuff from the 1980s on up. It's been at least seven or eight years since the car last ran. Is there perhaps some priming of the fuel pump or the injection system needed? Are there any other "Semi-Modern cars for Idiots" suggestions for where I might look? I'm torn on what to do with this car. It turns out it was never put on non-op so the DMV wants $700+ if someone should try to register it. Its market value even if it's up and running is negligible. But it's fundamentally a nice and rather rare car. The title is lost and I'm on my own, having to do a lien sale just to get the title so I can dispose of it somehow. 


Cars and Coffee and Flying Cars June 26

Matthew Spielberg
 

OK, I want my money back. Oh yeah, it was free.
Nice donuts. There was coffee.
There were no flying cars. Not even a full size mock up.

Lovely concept. Gas driven generator, charging a battery pack, and electrically driven rotors/propellers for vertical lift off and forward motion. But…
Although it has a generator to charge the battery, its range is limited to perhaps 250 miles.

Needs a drivers license. Needs a pilots license. Don’t have a pilots license, don’t worry...cost of the vehicle includes pilots license training.

Park it in your garage, wheel it out to the driveway, fold out the rotors and take off from your house?…well no. You get into it in car configuration and drive it like a car to the nearest airport and depart from there. The future is not here, but I guess that is why they call it the future. But taking deposits now.

And as a cars and coffee…it started at 8AM, we were there at 8, but directed across the street to an overflow parking lot. The main lot was not full, but we were sent across the street. I do not know what the rules were, but there seemed to be room for cars valued at over $100k.

David Russel was given a parking place of honor with his Tatraplan. Another Arcaner with a lovely 1950’s pickup, (who’s name has disappeared) arrived with his Arcane sweatshirt. KO and friend also put in an appearance for this electric vehicle. I talked to a guy with a like new 1965(?) Thunderbird convertible. Nice guy. I did not talk to any of the Mclaren or Ferrari owners. I guess that I am a snob.

At that point, having seen some cars but no flying cars, we finished our coffee and donut, took our goodie bag and balloon and headed out to 815 Portola Valley Road for a second Cars and Coffee of the morning, put on by the Silicon Valley Motor Club. (Next one scheduled for July 31) No admission charge, and the coffee is not free, but all proceeds go the church which provides the parking lot. Mix of sun with shade, and a really friendly and open vibe. Yeah, a lovely vintage Ferrari, and a Porsche or two that no-one could afford (but lovely to look at). And my scruffy Toyota Sports 800 was welcomed with open arms. I do not want to push the event too much, because sometimes smaller is better. (And they say kid and dog friendly.)

So, all in all, a lovely Saturday morning, and on our way home by noon. Perhaps next time a departure for Alice’s or the coast from Portola Valley.


Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Lou
 

   
   
    Most of my vehicles are pre war trucks.  It is essential to down shift    
on long down grades, Especially when towing a cat trailer with another   
truck on it.   Since there is no syncromesh in the transmission, and double   
clutching is not possible with a low revving engine, if you are going too fast,    
I must get into lower gear before the descent.   Newer transmissions like   
the NVG 4500 have a centrifugal lockout preventing shifting to a lower   
gear in an emergency.   They would rather you die in a crash than over   
rev your engine.               
    In my "Modern" car (1973 Honda )  I placed a throttle pot to activate   
regen in the first inch of depression on my service brake pedal.   I use energy       
to accelerate and regain some of that when I decelerate.   It works better    
in a lower gear.    Even tho the Honda has syncro in all forward gears, it    
shifts much easier when I double clutch.      
                Lou                   
PS:  In the picture below, I've circled the pot box on firewall.           
   
    The forward lever controls acceleration.     
The rear pot controls regenerative braking. 
It accounts for over 90% of my stops.      
The hydraulic brakes only serve to hold the    
vehicle in place after stopping.        
       
   
   
   
   

On 6/25/2021 12:51 PM, Ken Chambers wrote:
Yes, treat your clutch nicely or it will rob your wallet.

I just picked up a pristine '02 TDI Golf from a neighbor friend.  Garage kept, very low miles and professionally maintained for every little thing over the years, including a recent clutch replacement.  Apparently, the wife was driving it and somehow managed to smoke the clutch (yes, smoke) on one steep hill.

But if you understand how and why a clutch does what it does, it can easily outlast the engine.

Funny, I remember a number of years ago riding with a friend and we were waiting on an incline for a train to pass.  He was rocking the car fore and aft and using his clutch as a brake all the while complaining about what a lemon that car was.  Sheesh.

---Ken

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 12:35 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:
On Fri, 25 Jun 2021, sujit roy via groups.io wrote:
> I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift
> through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my
> 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern
> cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the
> brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake
> fade.

Brake fade is still an issue.  Not as bad as it once was, but still there.
For a very LONG downhill, engine braking, rather than riding the brakes,
is still important.

But, engine braking is no longer anywhere near as important as it once was
for stopping.
One of the reasons that it used to be taught was to reduce WEAR on the
braakes; not fading, but long-term wear.  But, disk brakes (or disc
brakes, depending on where your car was made) are no longer a project to
replace, and are cheap.  Clutch is now MORE work than it once was, and
expensive.  So, it makes more sense to replace brakes than to replace
clutches.

I knew a guy who memorized things, instead of trying to understand them.
Every time that he came to a stop, he would downshift and over-rev his
engine!


> What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV
> test, not much I suppose.

1) Most cars NOW are automatic.  A friend injured his left foot.  He
mentioned to the doctor that he has "standard transmission"; the doctor
said "STANDARD for transmission is automatic; oh, you mean that you have a
sports car with a stick shift?"
2) DMV written test sometimes has some questions that are based on
suggestions or tips in the driver's manual, such as asking motorcyclists:
"When following behind a car,
A) look around the side of the car
B) look through the car
C) look OVER the car"   (the answer that DMV insists on, but look OVER the
SUV??!?)
Therefore, the written test MIGHT once have mentioned downshifting, but
not anymore due to automatic transmissions.
DMV driving test doesn't CARE.  And doesn't include any high speed stops.
(Can you go around the block and then park the car without hitting
aanything?)

You should try the brakes periodically, to confirm they work.  But, you
should hardly ever be using them.
Which reminds me, ... with my mostly electric car, I really should slam on
the brakes occasionally, or the rotors might rust.


--
Grumpy Ol' Fred                 cisin@...







Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Ken Chambers
 

Yes, treat your clutch nicely or it will rob your wallet.

I just picked up a pristine '02 TDI Golf from a neighbor friend.  Garage kept, very low miles and professionally maintained for every little thing over the years, including a recent clutch replacement.  Apparently, the wife was driving it and somehow managed to smoke the clutch (yes, smoke) on one steep hill.

But if you understand how and why a clutch does what it does, it can easily outlast the engine.

Funny, I remember a number of years ago riding with a friend and we were waiting on an incline for a train to pass.  He was rocking the car fore and aft and using his clutch as a brake all the while complaining about what a lemon that car was.  Sheesh.

---Ken

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 12:35 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:
On Fri, 25 Jun 2021, sujit roy via groups.io wrote:
> I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift
> through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my
> 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern
> cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the
> brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake
> fade.

Brake fade is still an issue.  Not as bad as it once was, but still there.
For a very LONG downhill, engine braking, rather than riding the brakes,
is still important.

But, engine braking is no longer anywhere near as important as it once was
for stopping.
One of the reasons that it used to be taught was to reduce WEAR on the
braakes; not fading, but long-term wear.  But, disk brakes (or disc
brakes, depending on where your car was made) are no longer a project to
replace, and are cheap.  Clutch is now MORE work than it once was, and
expensive.  So, it makes more sense to replace brakes than to replace
clutches.

I knew a guy who memorized things, instead of trying to understand them.
Every time that he came to a stop, he would downshift and over-rev his
engine!


> What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV
> test, not much I suppose.

1) Most cars NOW are automatic.  A friend injured his left foot.  He
mentioned to the doctor that he has "standard transmission"; the doctor
said "STANDARD for transmission is automatic; oh, you mean that you have a
sports car with a stick shift?"
2) DMV written test sometimes has some questions that are based on
suggestions or tips in the driver's manual, such as asking motorcyclists:
"When following behind a car,
A) look around the side of the car
B) look through the car
C) look OVER the car"   (the answer that DMV insists on, but look OVER the
SUV??!?)
Therefore, the written test MIGHT once have mentioned downshifting, but
not anymore due to automatic transmissions.
DMV driving test doesn't CARE.  And doesn't include any high speed stops.
(Can you go around the block and then park the car without hitting
aanything?)

You should try the brakes periodically, to confirm they work.  But, you
should hardly ever be using them.
Which reminds me, ... with my mostly electric car, I really should slam on
the brakes occasionally, or the rotors might rust.


--
Grumpy Ol' Fred                 cisin@...






Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Fred Cisin
 

On Fri, 25 Jun 2021, sujit roy via groups.io wrote:
I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake fade.
Brake fade is still an issue. Not as bad as it once was, but still there.
For a very LONG downhill, engine braking, rather than riding the brakes, is still important.

But, engine braking is no longer anywhere near as important as it once was for stopping.
One of the reasons that it used to be taught was to reduce WEAR on the braakes; not fading, but long-term wear. But, disk brakes (or disc brakes, depending on where your car was made) are no longer a project to replace, and are cheap. Clutch is now MORE work than it once was, and expensive. So, it makes more sense to replace brakes than to replace clutches.

I knew a guy who memorized things, instead of trying to understand them. Every time that he came to a stop, he would downshift and over-rev his engine!


What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV test, not much I suppose.
1) Most cars NOW are automatic. A friend injured his left foot. He mentioned to the doctor that he has "standard transmission"; the doctor said "STANDARD for transmission is automatic; oh, you mean that you have a sports car with a stick shift?"
2) DMV written test sometimes has some questions that are based on suggestions or tips in the driver's manual, such as asking motorcyclists:
"When following behind a car,
A) look around the side of the car
B) look through the car
C) look OVER the car" (the answer that DMV insists on, but look OVER the SUV??!?)
Therefore, the written test MIGHT once have mentioned downshifting, but not anymore due to automatic transmissions.
DMV driving test doesn't CARE. And doesn't include any high speed stops.
(Can you go around the block and then park the car without hitting aanything?)

You should try the brakes periodically, to confirm they work. But, you should hardly ever be using them.
Which reminds me, ... with my mostly electric car, I really should slam on the brakes occasionally, or the rotors might rust.


--
Grumpy Ol' Fred cisin@xenosoft.com


Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Berkeley
 

I think that engine braking is a great idea on long descents. But using it routinely as a means of slowing down doesn’t make sense as others have noted. Now if you want to impart an arcane skill, teach him heel-toe downshifting.  

 

From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io <ArcaneAutos@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Spielberg via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2021 10:17 AM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Down shifting a manual car to slow down

 

Test instructor does not care as long as he drives and stops safely.

Brakes are much cheaper to replace than clutches.

One alternative school of thought is that, coming up to a red light, if you downshift to second, you are already in gear if the light turns green on you.

On 6/25/2021 9:53 AM, Ken Chambers wrote:

While it may be fun and sporty to shift through the gears, doing so to regularly slow down is not doing your clutch any favors.  It's a whole lot more expensive to renew a worn out clutch than to change brake shoes or pads.

 

I taught my son to drive like you don't have brakes.  That is, slow down gradually using good judgement, of course, so you don't hold up traffic behind your car.  And every time you use your brakes you're using gas, in that it requires fuel to get up to speed only to waste it in the form of heat with brake friction.

 

All the best,

---Ken

 

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 9:34 AM sujit roy via groups.io <sujitroy=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake fade.

What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV test, not much I suppose. 

Sujit

-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Matthew Spielberg
 

Test instructor does not care as long as he drives and stops safely.

Brakes are much cheaper to replace than clutches.

One alternative school of thought is that, coming up to a red light, if you downshift to second, you are already in gear if the light turns green on you.

On 6/25/2021 9:53 AM, Ken Chambers wrote:
While it may be fun and sporty to shift through the gears, doing so to regularly slow down is not doing your clutch any favors.  It's a whole lot more expensive to renew a worn out clutch than to change brake shoes or pads.

I taught my son to drive like you don't have brakes.  That is, slow down gradually using good judgement, of course, so you don't hold up traffic behind your car.  And every time you use your brakes you're using gas, in that it requires fuel to get up to speed only to waste it in the form of heat with brake friction.

All the best,
---Ken

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 9:34 AM sujit roy via groups.io <sujitroy=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake fade.

What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV test, not much I suppose. 

Sujit
-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Down shifting a manual car to slow down

Ken Chambers
 

While it may be fun and sporty to shift through the gears, doing so to regularly slow down is not doing your clutch any favors.  It's a whole lot more expensive to renew a worn out clutch than to change brake shoes or pads.

I taught my son to drive like you don't have brakes.  That is, slow down gradually using good judgement, of course, so you don't hold up traffic behind your car.  And every time you use your brakes you're using gas, in that it requires fuel to get up to speed only to waste it in the form of heat with brake friction.

All the best,
---Ken

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 9:34 AM sujit roy via groups.io <sujitroy=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake fade.

What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV test, not much I suppose. 

Sujit


Down shifting a manual car to slow down

sujit roy
 

I learnt to drive a stick shift car in the UK and was told to down shift through the gears to slow down. I still do it today and am teaching my 18 year old the same way. But what is the norm now with modern cars? I'd prefer the engine to slow down the car and not rely on the brakes. Not sure if modern cars with ABS and the like suffer from brake fade.

What does a test instructor expect? Based on my son's 10 min. CA DMV test, not much I suppose. 

Sujit


Re: Wheel Alignment for classics

David Russel
 

Custom Alignment in Mountain view on Wyandotte has a good reputation and apparently has experience with all sorts of cars and alignment systems.  Haven't used them myself.
David


On Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 11:08 AM sujit roy via groups.io <sujitroy=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Where around Cupertino/ San Jose do you take your classics for wheel alignment?
My Triumph Stag '71  like the TR6 uses shims in the rear to adjust toe in and toe out. 
Sujit


Invitation: Los Altos Hills Classic Car Show

Ken Nelson
 



---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Sarah Robustelli <srobustelli@...>
Date: Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 7:39 PM
Subject: Invitation: Los Altos Hills Classic Car Show
To: Sarah Robustelli <srobustelli@...>


Hello Classic Car Owner,

 

The Community Relations Committee of the Town of Los Altos Hills would like to invite you to exhibit your Classic Car at the upcoming Los Altos Hills Classic Car Show Event on Sunday, July 25th, from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm. If you would like to participate as an exhibitor, please fill out the following form at www.losaltoshills.ca.gov/carshow

 

We ask that you have your car thereby 9:30 am, but no earlier than 8:30 am. Sharon and Neal Rayborn will be at the entrance to Little League Fields No. 2 (large field) to guide you into your display space on the baseball field.

 

After your car is in its display space, there will be canopies, live music, a food truck, and Lionel trains. You will be provided two meal tickets for the food truck. 

 

DIRECTIONS TO PURISSIMA PARK, 27400 Purissima Road (LITTLE LEAGUE FIELDS): 

 

From the south, follow Foothill Expressway to Edith and turn left at the signal, following Edith to the end. Turn left and almost immediately turn right onto Robleda, driving approximately one mile to Purissima, just before the Freeway 280 underpass. Turn right onto Purissima for about one mile. Turn left into Field No. 2

 

From the north, take Foothill Expressway to Arastradero Road; turn right onto Arastradero and follow to Purissima Road just before the Freeway 280 underpass. Turn left onto Purissima for approximately ¾ mile. Then, turn right into Field No. 2.

 

Thank you for your enthusiasm and participation in this event. If you have any questions regarding this event, please contact Neal Rayborn at 650-941-4409.

 

We look forward to seeing you.

 

Community Relations Committee 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Robustelli

Sr. Community Services Supervisor

Town of Los Altos Hills

26379 Fremont Road, Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

650-947-2518

 

 

 


Re: Anyone need a Lathe?

Ken Nelson
 

 A real bargain - wish I was there and had the space for it - 

Ken

On Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 9:20 PM David Russel <djrussel@...> wrote:
Not CNC, but inexpensive 



David 

Sent From Mobile Phone


Anyone need a Lathe?

David Russel
 

Not CNC, but inexpensive 



David 

Sent From Mobile Phone


Wheel Alignment for classics

sujit roy
 

Where around Cupertino/ San Jose do you take your classics for wheel alignment?
My Triumph Stag '71  like the TR6 uses shims in the rear to adjust toe in and toe out. 
Sujit


Assorted laughs

Ken Nelson
 



Some good laughs.




Re: 🔗 Lance Hellman shared a link

600miles
 

email is now Arcane. Zoom is weird to me


Re: 🔗 Lance Hellman shared a link

Red Fred
 

This FB shit is too weird for me.  What is wrong with a simple email.


On Sun, Jun 13, 2021 at 8:30 PM Lou via groups.io <c1937=znet.com@groups.io> wrote:
   
   
   
Hi Ken,               
    It wants me to log in to YOUR facebook with your password.       
Thanks,            Lou                   
   
   
   
   
On 6/13/2021 6:43 PM, Ken Nelson wrote:
At least wear your belts!  From an E. coast car buddy - 

(expand the link)

 
See the post that he shared.
   
 
    Facebook
 
   
   
 
   
🔗 Lance Hellman shared a link.
June 13 at 9:05 PM
 
View
 
 
   
   
 
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