Date   

Nuns

Ken Nelson
 


I was in my early teens when I first heard this joke…perhaps you have heard it as well.

_._,_._,_



Nuns

Ken Nelson
 



 

 

I was in my early teens when I first heard this joke…perhaps you have heard it as well.


Free BMW wheels & Tires

David Russel
 

Hi all,

A neighbor just put these on the curb as freebies. If interested the
address is 3407 Shady Spring Ln. Mountain View. Clearly a first
come, first served situation.


Re: Conundrum

David Russel
 

...or limit yourself to only making right turns.

David

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Aug 11, 2020, at 11:13 AM, Byron Brill <jowett1@earthlink.net> wrote:

I removed the ignition switch completely the last time this happened and
bench tested it. All proved good and since it's a combo ign/lite switch,
there's a bit more to it. But as I said, both the ignition and lighting
sides of the switch operated properly. Since the PO left little in the way
of extra wire when replacing old wiring, removing the switch completely is a
pain. But I disassembled the instrument panel enough to disconnect portions
of the switch and test it in place this time around. Again, everything
worked as designed.

Then I noticed the left trafficator was on. With the ignition switch in the
off position, but hooked up to power, I moved the trafficator switch back to
its central 'off' position and Bingo! The fuel gauge dropped to zero and the
dim ignition light went out. So, switch - fine; regulator,
generator/dynamo, heater switch, alternator and diodes all A-Okay. Okay, no
alternator or diodes. Now, back out to the garage to trace a rat's nest of
black wires in the trafficator circuit...

Thanks for the ideas, boys.

Byron

-----Original Message-----
From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred
Cisin
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 7:56 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

Short internal to ignition switch is easily testable by disconnecting the
ignition switch wires, and checking the switch with a voltmeter, or using
jumper wires instead of the switch (don't forget to unlock the steering on
"modern" (1970s +) cars).


On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the
ignition switch.






Re: Conundrum

Byron Brill
 

I removed the ignition switch completely the last time this happened and
bench tested it. All proved good and since it's a combo ign/lite switch,
there's a bit more to it. But as I said, both the ignition and lighting
sides of the switch operated properly. Since the PO left little in the way
of extra wire when replacing old wiring, removing the switch completely is a
pain. But I disassembled the instrument panel enough to disconnect portions
of the switch and test it in place this time around. Again, everything
worked as designed.

Then I noticed the left trafficator was on. With the ignition switch in the
off position, but hooked up to power, I moved the trafficator switch back to
its central 'off' position and Bingo! The fuel gauge dropped to zero and the
dim ignition light went out. So, switch - fine; regulator,
generator/dynamo, heater switch, alternator and diodes all A-Okay. Okay, no
alternator or diodes. Now, back out to the garage to trace a rat's nest of
black wires in the trafficator circuit...

Thanks for the ideas, boys.

Byron

-----Original Message-----
From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred
Cisin
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 7:56 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

Short internal to ignition switch is easily testable by disconnecting the
ignition switch wires, and checking the switch with a voltmeter, or using
jumper wires instead of the switch (don't forget to unlock the steering on
"modern" (1970s +) cars).


On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the
ignition switch.


Re: Conundrum

Matthew Spielberg
 

Nice.

On 8/10/2020 9:55 PM, Red Fred wrote:
OK, a little off topic (sorry) BUT.   The chats about waiting for the lorry (tow truck) etc... makes me need to chime in.   

Back when I was young, dumb, & full of cum (not that long ago), I used to ship my tie wired '47 Indian Chief motorcycle to Europe every year.   I loved it.  I was immature, and the bike wasn't fully prepared.  So what?   
   Initially I cratd, and shipped my bike ahead of time, in hope that we would rendez-vous in a perfect setting.   The shipping instructions stated that no oil, or fuel was to be in the vehicle.   So I put it in containers, along with all my clothes, and gear for a month on the road with a vintage bike, in a foreghn land.   Little did I know that they didn't want any flamibles in the container!  Sure enough, a qt of oil popped open in my stolen SF Meter Maid helmet ( we didn't have a helmet law then, and I didn't own one; hence the nabbed unit)   Luckily, I  found some saw dust at the docks where my bike arrived, and I douched it out with nasty old sawdust.
   Actually the story gets way more involved than that, as I wasn't aware of any necessary Customs docuements, or shipping formalities.   My bike, and all my gear were quarantined for some 10 days while I roamed Homelessly in London.   Quite the expensive adventure. But that's a story for another day.
    So here I am, 20 something, on my '47 Chief, ready to conquer Europe.   I set off with Good Will leather suit cases strapped on my front fender, and my rear fender, protected by black garbage bags.  I had my trusty AAA map in my back pocket, which instantly morphed into paper mache in the first 200' of rain.   I was fucked.
    But I made it up from the docks of London, through the Jag works in Coventry, Wales, the Isle of Mann, and up into Scotland, before my 3 speed crash box transmission took a shit.  No problem, I still have 2nd & 3rd.  But I was loaded for bear with hiway gearing, so not having 1st gear was a desability.  I had already gone through all of the US & Canada before sending the bike over for this.  Cracking a cylinder head atop Pikes Peak was my first let down.   No problem, I still had socks  & underwear; lets go.  
    But it was when I was rolling down south from Scotland, with only 2 of my 3 gears, when my cylinder head blew again.   Realize that this is a flat head, and there are NO moving parts in the head.   The highly finned aluminum had simpley busted in half, and blew a chunk out from under my seat!  Pretty cool blue/white flame emitted, but the bike wasn't happy running on only one jug (these are 1200cc V-Twinns; bigger than a Pinto engine).   So I limped into the AA tow depot at the top of the M-25 around London after some 150 miles of agoney.   There is NO bribing anyone British, as I learned from when all my belongings were locked up in Customs.  I tried to coax a driver, but he said that we should just speak with the "Gov".    
    So in we go to the office.  It's late, and everyone smoked cigerettes back then.  I walked into a wall of smoke.    There,  behind the desk, was a skinny tatooed guy lost in smoke.  He asked what I would do if I was back home in the States.  "Summon the AAA"" I lied.  "Well, we are affiliated" he lied back, and he ordered one of his truck jockeys to take me back to London.  What a great bloke!
    This is when it gets good!  Said flatbed tow truck, with my pride & joy aboard, took a shit also!   So there we were, in the middle of a busy "round about" in London, broke down.   The driver was begging for support on the squalk box, but I kept seeing more & more tow trucks pass us.  Naturally, as an un-refined American, I fucking lost it.   When the next AA  truck was manuevering through the round about, I jumped out in front of it, and stopped it.   Kinda like stopping a big rig on I 5.   He stopped, and quickly grabbed the keys outta the ignition.  I mutha fucked him to get us back going, or I'd throw his keys back on the freeway.  He was completely dumbfounded, as NO body acted this way in the Queens country. 
    While they were loading my bike onto the new flat bed tow truck, I wondered around exploring; as you do.   Sure enough, I found the AA depo.   Kind of like the Cal Trans sign department.   So I hopped the fence (remember, I was younger then) and helped myself to various road signs.   I tossed them over the fence, and afixed them to the flatbed truck.  The AA guys didn't make a peep.   


So that's my story of waiting for tow trucks along the road in the land of Lucas.
Sorry for the book, RF.

PS.  I have a pretty good sign collection.

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:55 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:
Short internal to ignition switch is easily testable by disconnecting the
ignition switch wires, and checking the switch with a voltmeter, or using
jumper wires instead of the switch (don't forget to unlock the steering
on "modern" (1970s +) cars).


On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

> A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the ignition
> switch.



-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Conundrum

Red Fred
 

OK, a little off topic (sorry) BUT.   The chats about waiting for the lorry (tow truck) etc... makes me need to chime in.   

Back when I was young, dumb, & full of cum (not that long ago), I used to ship my tie wired '47 Indian Chief motorcycle to Europe every year.   I loved it.  I was immature, and the bike wasn't fully prepared.  So what?   
   Initially I cratd, and shipped my bike ahead of time, in hope that we would rendez-vous in a perfect setting.   The shipping instructions stated that no oil, or fuel was to be in the vehicle.   So I put it in containers, along with all my clothes, and gear for a month on the road with a vintage bike, in a foreghn land.   Little did I know that they didn't want any flamibles in the container!  Sure enough, a qt of oil popped open in my stolen SF Meter Maid helmet ( we didn't have a helmet law then, and I didn't own one; hence the nabbed unit)   Luckily, I  found some saw dust at the docks where my bike arrived, and I douched it out with nasty old sawdust.
   Actually the story gets way more involved than that, as I wasn't aware of any necessary Customs docuements, or shipping formalities.   My bike, and all my gear were quarantined for some 10 days while I roamed Homelessly in London.   Quite the expensive adventure. But that's a story for another day.
    So here I am, 20 something, on my '47 Chief, ready to conquer Europe.   I set off with Good Will leather suit cases strapped on my front fender, and my rear fender, protected by black garbage bags.  I had my trusty AAA map in my back pocket, which instantly morphed into paper mache in the first 200' of rain.   I was fucked.
    But I made it up from the docks of London, through the Jag works in Coventry, Wales, the Isle of Mann, and up into Scotland, before my 3 speed crash box transmission took a shit.  No problem, I still have 2nd & 3rd.  But I was loaded for bear with hiway gearing, so not having 1st gear was a desability.  I had already gone through all of the US & Canada before sending the bike over for this.  Cracking a cylinder head atop Pikes Peak was my first let down.   No problem, I still had socks  & underwear; lets go.  
    But it was when I was rolling down south from Scotland, with only 2 of my 3 gears, when my cylinder head blew again.   Realize that this is a flat head, and there are NO moving parts in the head.   The highly finned aluminum had simpley busted in half, and blew a chunk out from under my seat!  Pretty cool blue/white flame emitted, but the bike wasn't happy running on only one jug (these are 1200cc V-Twinns; bigger than a Pinto engine).   So I limped into the AA tow depot at the top of the M-25 around London after some 150 miles of agoney.   There is NO bribing anyone British, as I learned from when all my belongings were locked up in Customs.  I tried to coax a driver, but he said that we should just speak with the "Gov".    
    So in we go to the office.  It's late, and everyone smoked cigerettes back then.  I walked into a wall of smoke.    There,  behind the desk, was a skinny tatooed guy lost in smoke.  He asked what I would do if I was back home in the States.  "Summon the AAA"" I lied.  "Well, we are affiliated" he lied back, and he ordered one of his truck jockeys to take me back to London.  What a great bloke!
    This is when it gets good!  Said flatbed tow truck, with my pride & joy aboard, took a shit also!   So there we were, in the middle of a busy "round about" in London, broke down.   The driver was begging for support on the squalk box, but I kept seeing more & more tow trucks pass us.  Naturally, as an un-refined American, I fucking lost it.   When the next AA  truck was manuevering through the round about, I jumped out in front of it, and stopped it.   Kinda like stopping a big rig on I 5.   He stopped, and quickly grabbed the keys outta the ignition.  I mutha fucked him to get us back going, or I'd throw his keys back on the freeway.  He was completely dumbfounded, as NO body acted this way in the Queens country. 
    While they were loading my bike onto the new flat bed tow truck, I wondered around exploring; as you do.   Sure enough, I found the AA depo.   Kind of like the Cal Trans sign department.   So I hopped the fence (remember, I was younger then) and helped myself to various road signs.   I tossed them over the fence, and afixed them to the flatbed truck.  The AA guys didn't make a peep.   


So that's my story of waiting for tow trucks along the road in the land of Lucas.
Sorry for the book, RF.

PS.  I have a pretty good sign collection.

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:55 PM Fred Cisin <cisin@...> wrote:
Short internal to ignition switch is easily testable by disconnecting the
ignition switch wires, and checking the switch with a voltmeter, or using
jumper wires instead of the switch (don't forget to unlock the steering
on "modern" (1970s +) cars).


On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

> A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the ignition
> switch.




Re: Conundrum

Fred Cisin
 

Short internal to ignition switch is easily testable by disconnecting the ignition switch wires, and checking the switch with a voltmeter, or using jumper wires instead of the switch (don't forget to unlock the steering on "modern" (1970s +) cars).

On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Matthew Spielberg wrote:

A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the ignition switch.


Re: Conundrum

Scott Davis
 

Disconnect the regulator and see what happens

At 05:18 PM 8/10/2020, you wrote:

A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the ignition switch.
On 8/10/2020 5:00 PM, Byron Brill wrote:
I suspected the regulator might be involved, but admit to not fully understanding exactly how. The first couple of times this happened, the engine continued to run (not Diesel) when the battery was disconnected. Today, it quits when the battery is disconnected. With the battery connected and the engine running, the ignition light is out. When the ignition is on but the engine is not running, the ignition light shines brightly, and is on but dim when the ignition is off. Fuel gauge, which is keyed to the ignition, is on at all times as long as the battery remains connected.
Â
Byron
Â
Â
From: <mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io>ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dick Tuttle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 3:17 PM
To: <mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io>ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum
Â
Once we had a two-stroke carbureted Goliath that would get into diesel mode and not shut off. Â We even pulled the plug wires off. Â It would run around 3000 rpm smoothly although the throttle plate was on idle speed, showing how much more power the engine made on detonation cycle. Â Maybe Bourke was right with his detonation cycle engine.
Â
As for Byron's situation, generator output and ignition come to close proximity at the regulator. If the generator field did not get cut by the ignition switch, could it keep producing power even though disconnected from the battery? Â Is the ignition warning light on or off during the episodes?
Â
Â
Dick Tuttle

-----Original Message-----
From: Byron Brill <<mailto:jowett1@earthlink.net>jowett1@earthlink.net>
To: <mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io>ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 10, 2020 2:42 pm
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum
Thanks for the responses, guys. I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens. No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo. Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track. I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.
Â
Byron
Â
From: Lou [<mailto:c1937@znet.com>mailto:c1937@znet.com]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: <mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io>ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <<mailto:jowett1@earthlink.net>jowett1@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum
Â
  Â
  Â
Hi Byron,                 Â
   I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.      Â
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.     Â
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.     Â
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it  Â
got under the clutch. She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the   Â
road.  After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,  Â
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.  Â
   I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy   Â
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground. Â
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a   Â
Plug wire when the Austin is running. Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
   When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity  Â
will not be compromised. Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
         Lou     Â
[]
        Â
(Is this the car?) Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
  Â
  Â
  Â
  Â
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:
One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep. Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling). This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test. The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO. Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter. All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off). Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?
Â
Hopelessly yours,
Byron

Â
--
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Conundrum

Matthew Spielberg
 

A short between "bat" and "ign" either in the wiring or in the ignition switch.

On 8/10/2020 5:00 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

I suspected the regulator might be involved, but admit to not fully understanding exactly how.  The first couple of times this happened, the engine continued to run (not Diesel) when the battery was disconnected.  Today, it quits when the battery is disconnected.  With the battery connected and the engine running, the ignition light is out.  When the ignition is on but the engine is not running, the ignition light shines brightly, and is on but dim when the ignition is off.  Fuel gauge, which is keyed to the ignition, is on at all times as long as the battery remains connected.

 

Byron

 

 

From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dick Tuttle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 3:17 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

Once we had a two-stroke carbureted Goliath that would get into diesel mode and not shut off.  We even pulled the plug wires off.  It would run around 3000 rpm smoothly although the throttle plate was on idle speed, showing how much more power the engine made on detonation cycle.  Maybe Bourke was right with his detonation cycle engine.

 

As for Byron's situation, generator output and ignition come to close proximity at the regulator. If the generator field did not get cut by the ignition switch, could it keep producing power even though disconnected from the battery?  Is the ignition warning light on or off during the episodes?

 

 

Dick Tuttle

-----Original Message-----
From: Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 10, 2020 2:42 pm
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.

 

Byron

 

From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

 

-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Conundrum

Byron Brill
 

Sorry, but you got that one wrong, ol’ pal.  I know my British, and the condition caused when waiting for the lorry is to Die Olde.  But close…

 

From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Russel
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 4:59 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

Byron,

 

All old British cars have Die Odes!  Usually something about waiting for the pick up Lorry as I recall  ;-)

David 

 

Sent From Mobile Phone



On Aug 10, 2020, at 2:42 PM, Byron Brill <jowett1@...> wrote:



Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.

 

Byron

 

From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       

<image001.jpg>

            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

 


Re: Conundrum

Byron Brill
 

I suspected the regulator might be involved, but admit to not fully understanding exactly how.  The first couple of times this happened, the engine continued to run (not Diesel) when the battery was disconnected.  Today, it quits when the battery is disconnected.  With the battery connected and the engine running, the ignition light is out.  When the ignition is on but the engine is not running, the ignition light shines brightly, and is on but dim when the ignition is off.  Fuel gauge, which is keyed to the ignition, is on at all times as long as the battery remains connected.

 

Byron

 

 

From: ArcaneAutos@groups.io [mailto:ArcaneAutos@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dick Tuttle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 3:17 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

Once we had a two-stroke carbureted Goliath that would get into diesel mode and not shut off.  We even pulled the plug wires off.  It would run around 3000 rpm smoothly although the throttle plate was on idle speed, showing how much more power the engine made on detonation cycle.  Maybe Bourke was right with his detonation cycle engine.

 

As for Byron's situation, generator output and ignition come to close proximity at the regulator. If the generator field did not get cut by the ignition switch, could it keep producing power even though disconnected from the battery?  Is the ignition warning light on or off during the episodes?

 

 

Dick Tuttle

-----Original Message-----
From: Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 10, 2020 2:42 pm
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.

 

Byron

 

From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

 


Re: Conundrum

David Russel
 

Byron,

All old British cars have Die Odes!  Usually something about waiting for the pick up Lorry as I recall  ;-)

David 

Sent From Mobile Phone

On Aug 10, 2020, at 2:42 PM, Byron Brill <jowett1@...> wrote:



Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.

 

Byron

 

From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       

<image001.jpg>
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

 


Re: Conundrum

Dick Tuttle
 

Once we had a two-stroke carbureted Goliath that would get into diesel mode and not shut off.  We even pulled the plug wires off.  It would run around 3000 rpm smoothly although the throttle plate was on idle speed, showing how much more power the engine made on detonation cycle.  Maybe Bourke was right with his detonation cycle engine.

As for Byron's situation, generator output and ignition come to close proximity at the regulator. If the generator field did not get cut by the ignition switch, could it keep producing power even though disconnected from the battery?  Is the ignition warning light on or off during the episodes?


Dick Tuttle


-----Original Message-----
From: Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 10, 2020 2:42 pm
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.
 
Byron
 
From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum
 
   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:
One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?
 
Hopelessly yours,
Byron
 


Re: Conundrum

Fred Cisin
 

Is there an electric fan?
If not radiator, even a heater fan COULD be a problem.

In mid 1970s, we encountered Honda Civics that wouldn't stop if hot, but worked fine when cold. They had a thermostatically controlled electric fan on the radiator, that only ran when at the highest temperatures.

When cold (fan off) it was fine. When hot, when the ignition switch was turned off, the inertial momentum of the fan blades kept them spinning briefly. The fan motor acted as a generator, and produced electricity on the hot side of the ignition. So, even though the keyswitch was off, the hot side was still energized. If/When it cooled down enough for the thermostatic switch of the fan (screwed into the bottom of the radiator) to shut off, THEN the car could shut off.

We solved it my splicing a diode in series with the fan, sothat power could flow TO the fan, but could not flow from the fan back to the harness. Later, Honda did the same, but theirs looked nice plugged into the harness.

Years later, cars started to have a "feature" of fan running after car was shut off until the radiator cooled. That was done by simply having the fan wired to fused battery hot, instead of to ignition hot.
That cooled the radiator AND meant that back-fed power didn't keep the engine on. Win-win, unless the battery was so marginal that it couldn't start back up later.


There was also ANOTHER diode retroactively added. ANOTHER one that started in the aftermarket, and then became a factory supported mod. Ignition coil was powered after a dropping resistor. When battery was a little down on cold mornings, sometimes the coil didn't get enough volts. SO, a DIODE from the starter trigger to the coil bypassed the resistor ONLY WHEN CRANKING, to get more voltage, and made a big difference when starting with a weak battery. It had to be a diode, or tother circuitry, to prevent the coil voltage from flowing from coil to starter.

--
Grumpy Ol' Fred cisin@xenosoft.com

On Mon, 10 Aug 2020, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn't want to go to sleep. Turn off the
ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run
(it is NOT dieseling). This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas
combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don't have a spare to conduct a
test. The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all
decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO. Had the same
experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested
its function with a power supply and voltmeter. All tested fine and when
reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical
power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was
turned off). Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition
switch, regulator or something else?



Hopelessly yours,

Byron


Re: Conundrum

Byron Brill
 

Thanks for the responses, guys.  I’ll give it a go, Matt, and see what happens.  No diodes or alternator, just the ol’ dynamo.  Different Austin, Lou, but you’re on the right track.  I’ll do my best not to tape the throttle wide open while I’m at it.

 

Byron

 

From: Lou [mailto:c1937@...]
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 1:25 PM
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io; Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Subject: Re: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   
On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

 


Re: Conundrum

Lou
 

   
   
Hi Byron,                       
    I'll spare you the boredom of a plethora of Lucas jokes.         
A friend in VW van had the ign sw dangling from the steering column.       
I suggested she tape it in place till she could locate the nut to hold it in place.       
The throttle stuck full, in a panic she broke the key in the switch when it   
got under the clutch.  She did get it in neutral and pulled to the side of the    
road.   After about 20 minutes at full rev, while waiting for a tow truck,   
a rod found it's way out of the crank case.   
    I would recommend a securely mounted switch under the dash, but easy    
to reach, to cut power to the system and/or short the distributor ground.  
This is much easier and less shocking than raising the bonnet & grabbing a    
Plug wire when the Austin is running.               
    When a scarce, NOS part that works appears, the Austin's authenticity   
will not be compromised.            
            Lou       
            
(Is this the car?)            
   
   
   
   

On 8/10/2020 12:34 PM, Byron Brill wrote:

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron



Re: Conundrum

Matthew Spielberg
 

Disconnect wire from starter switch to ignition. Use your meter and see if the ignition circuit is still hot. If so, short in wiring, not in ignition switch.

If ignition lead from switch is hot when ignition is off, problem with switch.

On 8/10/2020 12:51 PM, Scott Davis wrote:
Find the blown diode that is back feeding. 

You might start with the alternator

Scott


-------- Original message --------
From: Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Date: 8/10/20 12:35 (GMT-08:00)
Subject: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

-- 
Matthew M Spielberg
21855 Redwood Road
Castro Valley, CA 94546
(510) 886-5751
(209) 586-0250


Re: Conundrum

Scott Davis
 

Find the blown diode that is back feeding. 

You might start with the alternator

Scott


-------- Original message --------
From: Byron Brill <jowett1@...>
Date: 8/10/20 12:35 (GMT-08:00)
To: ArcaneAutos@groups.io
Subject: [ArcaneAutos] Conundrum

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron


Conundrum

Byron Brill
 

One of my Austins has decided it doesn’t want to go to sleep.  Turn off the ignition and all systems still have power and the engine continues to run (it is NOT dieseling).  This one, unfortunately, has an older style Lucas combo ignition/lighting switch for which I don’t have a spare to conduct a test.  The wiring on this car is suspect and difficult to trace, as all decrepit wiring was replaced with black wiring by the PO.  Had the same experience a couple of months back, pulled the ignition switch and tested its function with a power supply and voltmeter.  All tested fine and when reinstalled in the car, everything functioned as normal (ie. Electrical power to ignition and all systems cut & engine stopped when the key was turned off).  Can anyone advise where I should start looking first; ignition switch, regulator or something else?

 

Hopelessly yours,

Byron

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