Whatcha reading - been reading ???


Becky Lindroos
 

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky


Hugh
 

I recently finished     Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life     and I really liked the openness and honesty.



Hugh


On Friday, July 30, 2021, 11:21:23 AM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:


What all has everybody been reading this month?  Anything worth giving us the heads up about?  Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol.  Non-fiction or fiction is fine -  And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned.  My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky





Magda
 

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda

On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky




Merilee Olson
 

Gotten back to David Quammen’s  The Song of the Dodo, which is excellent.  Finished Martin Amis’s The Rub of Time, which is an interesting group of essays, and finally finished the magisterial Europe Central by William Vollmann. Plan to begin The Code Breakers soon. Catching up on NYers, Harper’s, and Atlantics. Read our latest Booker selection, Real Life, which was only so-so.

On Fri, Jul 30, 2021 at 11:21 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
What all has everybody been reading this month?  Anything worth giving us the heads up about?  Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol.  Non-fiction or fiction is fine -  And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned.  My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth. 

Becky





Becky Lindroos
 

My reading this month -

Non-fiction
Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife ~ by Bart Ehrman
Fascinating book! I read several of Ehrman’s books over the years and I got to a point where many of them seemed to contain one interesting new aspect, but were otherwise repetitious. This one is a bit different in that the main subject matter includes many non-Jesus topics including Homer and Socrates and Gilgamesh, etc. Also, Ehrman gives specific lines of reference.
******************

This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends
by Nicole Perlroth
It’s about cyber-security and hacking and the market for the goodies. Security is failing and has been failing for years. Perlroth's account is long and detailed - Amazon calls it “monumental.” She’s the cybersecurity correspondent for the New York Times. I thought it was a great book (9.5) and as a result I updated my laptop and iPad. LOL!
I gave it a 9.5.

*****
Landslide: The Final Days of the Trump Presidency
by Michael Wolff
The way Wolff writes it, and the way Holter Graham reads it, this is a pretty funny book until the end. But don’t think about any of it because then the shit-show might get scary.
I gave it an 8.
*****

Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings
By Neil Price

Amazing book by Neil Price who tries to write a history of the Vikings more from their point of view than has been done before. He tells about who they were and how we know this or intelligently figure it.
I gave this one a 9.75 and I really want to read it again.
*****

Nightmare Scenario: The Trump Administration’s Response to the Pandemic That Changed History
by Yasmeen Abutaleb
This book covers it all up to about May or April of 2021 - published on June 29. It has breadth and width with satisfactory depth- not too much of any one thing. It was a great review of a horrible year.

FICTION
Literary fiction:
At Night All Blood Is Black ~ by David Diop - Booker Prize
https://mybecky.blog/2021/07/04/43980/

Real Life by Brandon Taylor
Stupid - I don’t think this was written for me or maybe even my age group. It was written for young adults who don’t know that human beings (LGBTQ or not) have hadn’t thoughts and feelings and written about them. Taylor thinks this is all new and exciting with him. OR!!! It might be for people who are not LGBTQ but the idea that these folks are people and do have thoughts and feelings is new. ???

Genre Crime:
Back of Beyond ~ by C.J. Box
The Maine Mutiny ~ by Jessica Fletcher and Donald Bain
Never Far Away – by Michael Koryta
Vanished ~ by Victor Methos
The Silence of the Grave ~ by Arnaldur Indriðason.

Becky

On Jul 30, 2021, at 10:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky




johannakurz
 

You are all so busy reading. I am traveling around and right now my son and granddaughter visit me...so  there is no time left for reading much.
I am still busy with my Danish literature and besides the books here..I am half way through Humboldt as well....I have read Graham Swift: Mothering Sunday and some political books about current German affairs....like "Property Obliges" a key message of a social democracy.

Johanna



Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...>
Datum: 30.07.21 22:16 (GMT+01:00)
An: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Betreff: Re: [AllNonfiction] Whatcha reading - been reading ???

My reading this month -  

Non-fiction
Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife ~ by Bart Ehrman
Fascinating book! I read several of Ehrman’s books over the years and I got to a point where many of them seemed to contain one interesting new aspect, but were otherwise repetitious. This one is a bit different in that the main subject matter includes many non-Jesus topics including Homer and Socrates and Gilgamesh, etc.  Also, Ehrman gives specific lines of reference.
******************

This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends
by Nicole Perlroth
It’s about cyber-security and hacking and the market for the goodies. Security is failing and  has been failing for years.  Perlroth's account is long and detailed - Amazon calls it “monumental.”   She’s the cybersecurity correspondent for the New York Times.  I thought it was a great book (9.5) and as a result I updated my laptop and iPad. LOL!
I gave it a 9.5.

*****
Landslide: The Final Days of the Trump Presidency
by Michael Wolff
The way Wolff writes it, and the way Holter Graham reads it, this is a pretty funny book until the end. But don’t think about any of it because then the shit-show might get scary.
I gave it an 8.
*****

Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings
By Neil Price

Amazing book by Neil Price who tries to write a history of the Vikings more from their point of view than has been done before.  He tells about who they were and how we know this or intelligently figure it.
I gave this one a 9.75 and I really want to read it again.  
*****

Nightmare Scenario: The Trump Administration’s Response to the Pandemic That Changed History
by Yasmeen Abutaleb
This book covers it all up to about May or April of 2021 - published on June 29.  It has breadth and width with satisfactory depth-  not too much of any one thing.  It was a great review of a horrible year.

FICTION
Literary fiction:
At Night All Blood Is Black ~ by David Diop -  Booker Prize
https://mybecky.blog/2021/07/04/43980/

Real Life by Brandon Taylor
Stupid - I don’t think this was written for me or maybe even my age group.  It was written for young adults who don’t know that human beings (LGBTQ or not) have hadn’t thoughts and feelings and written about them.  Taylor thinks this is all new and exciting with him.  OR!!! It might be for people who are not LGBTQ but the idea that these folks are people and do have thoughts and feelings is new.  ???

Genre Crime:
Back of Beyond ~ by C.J. Box
The Maine Mutiny ~ by Jessica Fletcher and Donald Bain
Never Far Away – by Michael Koryta
Vanished ~ by Victor Methos
The Silence of the Grave ~ by Arnaldur Indriðason.

Becky

> On Jul 30, 2021, at 10:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
>
> What all has everybody been reading this month?  Anything worth giving us the heads up about?  Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol.  Non-fiction or fiction is fine -  And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned.  My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
>







Jim Harris
 

I'm reading The Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson with my friend Linda. We call it our 2-person book club - we've read a couple of dozen books together.

Because of that book, I started reading from Scribd The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix.

I'm also listening to The Storm by George R. Stewart, a novel from the 1940s about a terrible storm that hits California. Early, an eco-disaster novel by the guy who wrote The Earth Abides.


Jeanne
 

Might I assune that like all of Isaac son's books, Code Breaker is a great one? its next on my TBR list.So sorry it didn't get selected here.



On July 31, 2021, at 9:33 AM, Jim Harris <jameswallaceharris@...> wrote:


I'm reading The Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson with my friend Linda. We call it our 2-person book club - we've read a couple of dozen books together.

Because of that book, I started reading from Scribd The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix.

I'm also listening to The Storm by George R. Stewart, a novel from the 1940s about a terrible storm that hits California. Early, an eco-disaster novel by the guy who wrote The Earth Abides.


Jeanne
 

The got Helgoland on the cheap today or yesterday before reading your recommendation... Will move it up the "pile."

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky




Jeanne
 

Re: mosquitos... Didn't they just release those genetically modified ones? The ones that are attractive to mate with, but produce sterile offspring?

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky




Merilee Olson
 

That mosquito technology is so cool!

On Sun, Aug 1, 2021 at 10:32 PM Jeanne <soul121@...> wrote:
Re: mosquitos... Didn't they just release those genetically modified ones? The ones that are attractive to mate with, but produce sterile offspring?

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@...> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month.  The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson.  It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers.  Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books.  It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books.  I definitely recommend it.  8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR.  Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland.  I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases.  It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by  Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
> On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
>
> What all has everybody been reading this month?  Anything worth giving us the heads up about?  Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol.  Non-fiction or fiction is fine -  And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned.  My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
>











Becky Lindroos
 

I don’t think we want to kill off the mosquitos because they pollinate and are food for lots of animals like fish and birds. They also eat some tiny insects. They can be dangerous but killing off different species of wildlife isn’t exactly what might be good for the planet right now. (Maybe they’re redundant though …?)

Becky

On Aug 1, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

Re: mosquitos... Didn't they just release those genetically modified ones? The ones that are attractive to mate with, but produce sterile offspring?

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky












Jeanne
 

I know! Also don't forget the bats!(one of my favorites). Ok, it's different than I thought....just sent along CNN article. Still, man doesn't usually for see too well the greater picture...

On August 2, 2021, at 4:50 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

I don’t think we want to kill off the mosquitos because they pollinate and are food for lots of animals like fish and birds. They also eat some tiny insects. They can be dangerous but killing off different species of wildlife isn’t exactly what might be good for the planet right now. (Maybe they’re redundant though …?)

Becky

On Aug 1, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

Re: mosquitos... Didn't they just release those genetically modified ones? The ones that are attractive to mate with, but produce sterile offspring?

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky












Magda
 

It turns out that just releasing genetically engineered mosquitoes into the wild does not guarantee success.  Other mosquitoes may not find them attractive enough, for example :)
 In the wild, even a small genetic change almost always incurs what scientists call a fitness cost: Either an engineered insect won’t be as hardy as its wild peers or it won’t be an attractive mate. (Simply changing the fur color of a fruit fly from brown to yellow, as Gantz did, for instance, reduces its chance of mating by 99 percent.) More radical changes, like creating a mosquito that produces only male offspring, are likely to face even more resistance. Nature is good at circumventing anything that thwarts procreation.’ (Sorry for the size -can’t do anything about it)

This from a long but very good article in the New York Times

And Elizabeth Kolbert on basically the same topic, if you have access to the New Yorker
Magda

On Aug 2, 2021, at 9:04 AM, Jeanne <soul121@...> wrote:

I know! Also don't forget the bats!(one of my favorites). Ok, it's different than I thought....just sent along CNN article. Still, man doesn't usually for see too well the greater picture...

On August 2, 2021, at 4:50 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:

I don’t think we want to kill off the mosquitos because they pollinate and are food for lots of animals like fish and birds. They also eat some tiny insects.  They can be dangerous but killing off different species of wildlife isn’t exactly what might be good for the planet right now.  (Maybe they’re redundant though …?)

Becky

On Aug 1, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Jeanne <soul121@...> wrote:

Re: mosquitos... Didn't they just release those genetically modified ones? The ones that are attractive to mate with, but produce sterile offspring?

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@...> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month.  The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson.  It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers.  Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books.  It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books.  I definitely recommend it.  8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR.  Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland.  I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases.  It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by  Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month?  Anything worth giving us the heads up about?  Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol.  Non-fiction or fiction is fine -  And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned.  My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky


























Magda
 

Just finished Helgoland. Please let me know what you think about his ideas. Somehow Eastern philosophy and his quantum theory merge there :)

Magda

On Aug 1, 2021, at 10:31 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

The got Helgoland on the cheap today or yesterday before reading your recommendation... Will move it up the "pile."

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky












Jeanne
 

I got this one for my brother too....though he hasn't as much time to read since he's still working full-time.

On August 2, 2021, at 5:44 PM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

Just finished Helgoland. Please let me know what you think about his ideas. Somehow Eastern philosophy and his quantum theory merge there :)

Magda

On Aug 1, 2021, at 10:31 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

The got Helgoland on the cheap today or yesterday before reading your recommendation... Will move it up the "pile."

On July 30, 2021, at 9:40 AM, Magda <fotka.kalinowska@gmail.com> wrote:

I read a couple more books than usual this month. The fact that I sprained my ankle probably helped to keep me more in one place and reading, too:)
So, on the non-fiction front, I read Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson. It’s about CRISPR and people who made the discoveries leading to it and its uses, with the prominence given to Jennifer Doudna, one of its discoverers. Even though I found it overly optimistic, and somewhat overwrought on the human portrayal side of things, it’s a great work, like all Isaacson’s books. It is very up to date too, and explains the techniques used in different COVID19 vaccines in relation to CRISPR.
You may remember that it was on our list for this round of books. I definitely recommend it. 8.75
I am also reading a book by Doudna herself, Crack in Creation, which is more on the science of CRISPR. Very well written and recommended if you have an interest in it.

Another small book of popular science that I’m in the middle of is the one by a physicist, Carlo Rovelli, on quantum physics entitled Helgoland. I definitely recommend anything by him, he is a delightfully well read, witty and clear Italian university professor who teaches quantum gravity, and has written popular books on time and quantum physics that are just a joy to read!

In other non-fiction, I read two books on mosquitoes, and have developed somewhat of a fear and awe for these creatures. Mosquitoes are our top predators and kill more people in a year than any other animals.
One of these books, The Mosquito, A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy Winegard deals with mosquito in relation to history. Winegard is a historian, and he goes through history starting with the most ancient and finishing with the most recent and examines how many battles, conflicts and colonization efforts were lost or won or thwarted by the mosquito- borne diseases. It’s an impressive book, and its conclusions may be disputed, but it’s very interesting to look at the world’s history from this point of view.
8
The other mosquito book I read was written from a biological, epidemiological and political point of view, and was very interesting as well. Mosquito, A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman, who is now deceased epidemiologist with very impressive credentials, and Michael DAntonio, a journalist.
8.5

In fiction, I read and enjoyed
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (8), and the book that won the Canadian Governor General Award, This Red Line Goes Straight to Your Heart by Madhur Anand (9)

Magda
On Jul 30, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

What all has everybody been reading this month? Anything worth giving us the heads up about? Anything really dumb so we can avoid it? lol. Non-fiction or fiction is fine - And thank you for all the additional "books of interest” (or whatever) which were mentioned. My TBR list (aka Wish List) overfloweth.

Becky