REL: Q 10


Becky Lindroos
 

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?

• Fort A.P. Hill — Ambrose Powell Hill Jr - Virginia
• Camp Beauregard — P.G.T. Beauregard - Louisiana
• Fort Benning — Henry Benning - North Carolina/Georgia
• Fort Bragg — Braxton Bragg - North Carolina
• Fort Gordon — John Brown Gordon - Georgia
• Fort Hood — John Bell Hood - Texas
• Fort Lee — Robert E. Lee - Virginia
• Fort Pickett — George Pickett - Virginia
Fort Beauregard - Pierre G.T. Beauregard - Louisiana
Fort Polk - Leonides Polk in Louisiana

Well it would have been a difficult situation to try to name Fort Benning for General Sherman. You think they might want to try that one even now? LOL! What should they name the bases instead?

However, Trump vowed the names of those 10 southern Army posts named for Confederate generals from the Civil War would not be changed during his administration. - so there! (Omg)

Siedule wants to change the names of those bases because the war is over and the names are more harmful to our military forces and country at large than they are helpful.

They were chosen in large part to help heal the wounds of war. By including the Confederate Generals we were stating that the Civil War was OUR war, North and South, and we were not hanging on to a bunch of old bad feelings. We did hang on though, and it was very hard on all three sides, the Black side, the Northern White side and the Southern White side.)

Other countries have been physically split in two because of Civil Wars - ie Korea and Ireland (there are others but they’re tiny). Vietnam almost was. Is what has happened in Israel a Civil War?

Becky


Jenny Berman Ross
 

Here is some history as to why the bases were named after Confederate Generals - a practice that started in the early 20th century along with the resurgence of the KKK and the popularization of the lost cause narrative. 

https://taskandpurpose.com/news/army-confederate-post-study/

My impression was that Siedule wanted to change the names because of the message they sent both to non-White members of the military and to the world at large - other countries do not honor people who betrayed their countries.

Looking at the individual naming decisions, it does not look like it was done to to heal the wounds of war.  In contrast to the Army, the majority of Navy and Marine Corps bases are named after their locations, and Air Force bases were named after decorated war heroes and early aviation pioneers like the Wright Brothers and Samuel P. Langley. 

Jenny

A commission is currently examining the names, not just of Army bases, but of other military assets, and will make recommendations regarding which to change and what to. 



Becky Lindroos
 

Yes! Names of WWs I and II heroes. I’m not big on the military at my best, but seeing it as a necessary evil we might as well name them appropriately.

Becky

On Jul 13, 2021, at 4:27 PM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@comcast.net> wrote:

Here is some history as to why the bases were named after Confederate Generals - a practice that started in the early 20th century along with the resurgence of the KKK and the popularization of the lost cause narrative.

https://taskandpurpose.com/news/army-confederate-post-study/

My impression was that Siedule wanted to change the names because of the message they sent both to non-White members of the military and to the world at large - other countries do not honor people who betrayed their countries.

Looking at the individual naming decisions, it does not look like it was done to to heal the wounds of war. In contrast to the Army, the majority of Navy and Marine Corps bases are named after their locations, and Air Force bases were named after decorated war heroes and early aviation pioneers like the Wright Brothers and Samuel P. Langley.

Jenny

A commission is currently examining the names, not just of Army bases, but of other military assets, and will make recommendations regarding which to change and what to.



Jeffrey Taylor
 

Let us not neglect Korea.

On Tuesday, July 13, 2021, 07:54:01 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:


Yes!  Names of WWs I and II heroes.  I’m not big on the military at my best, but seeing it as a necessary evil we might as well name them appropriately.

Becky

> On Jul 13, 2021, at 4:27 PM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@...> wrote:
>
> Here is some history as to why the bases were named after Confederate Generals - a practice that started in the early 20th century along with the resurgence of the KKK and the popularization of the lost cause narrative.
>
> https://taskandpurpose.com/news/army-confederate-post-study/
>
> My impression was that Siedule wanted to change the names because of the message they sent both to non-White members of the military and to the world at large - other countries do not honor people who betrayed their countries.
>
> Looking at the individual naming decisions, it does not look like it was done to to heal the wounds of war.  In contrast to the Army, the majority of Navy and Marine Corps bases are named after their locations, and Air Force bases were named after decorated war heroes and early aviation pioneers like the Wright Brothers and Samuel P. Langley.
>
> Jenny
>
> A commission is currently examining the names, not just of Army bases, but of other military assets, and will make recommendations regarding which to change and what to.
>
>
>







Becky Lindroos
 

Korea gets neglected too much I think . We pay attention to what’s going on over there, what with Kim Jung Un and all, but with the Korean War? Not much. I wonder if it feels like a “loss” to us because of what's happened since (the Kims)?

Becky

On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:29 PM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Let us not neglect Korea.

On Tuesday, July 13, 2021, 07:54:01 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:


Yes! Names of WWs I and II heroes. I’m not big on the military at my best, but seeing it as a necessary evil we might as well name them appropriately.

Becky

On Jul 13, 2021, at 4:27 PM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@comcast.net> wrote:

Here is some history as to why the bases were named after Confederate Generals - a practice that started in the early 20th century along with the resurgence of the KKK and the popularization of the lost cause narrative.

https://taskandpurpose.com/news/army-confederate-post-study/

My impression was that Siedule wanted to change the names because of the message they sent both to non-White members of the military and to the world at large - other countries do not honor people who betrayed their countries.

Looking at the individual naming decisions, it does not look like it was done to to heal the wounds of war. In contrast to the Army, the majority of Navy and Marine Corps bases are named after their locations, and Air Force bases were named after decorated war heroes and early aviation pioneers like the Wright Brothers and Samuel P. Langley.

Jenny

A commission is currently examining the names, not just of Army bases, but of other military assets, and will make recommendations regarding which to change and what to.








Becky Lindroos
 

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too -
Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody
Commodore Grace Hopper
Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut)
Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky


Jeanne
 

Lol on your last choice... We s II ready have Fort Dix in NJ (not for Dorothea though)

On July 15, 2021, at 7:18 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too -
Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody
Commodore Grace Hopper
Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut)
Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky


Jenny Berman Ross
 

US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.

Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training. 

Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:

https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html

Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.

Jenny


Becky Lindroos
 

I want Dorthea Dix’s name on a US Army base! She may be best known for her work with the mentally ill, and pretty Quakerish about nursing both sides, but during the Civil War, she served as a Superintendent of US Army Nurses. She was born in Maine but lived in Mass a lot and gave a lot to Fort Eustis (Langley) in Virginia.

If reading this book did one thing for me it was to inspire me to support more military bases named for women!!!

Becky

On Jul 15, 2021, at 9:28 AM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

Lol on your last choice... We s II ready have Fort Dix in NJ (not for Dorothea though)

On July 15, 2021, at 7:18 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too -
Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody
Commodore Grace Hopper
Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut)
Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky












Becky Lindroos
 

I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.) I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet. (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)

"Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world

And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down. My daughter married one of their sons.

My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.

Becky

On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@comcast.net> wrote:

US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.

Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.

Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:

https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html

Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.

Jenny


Sandie Kirkland
 

NC had a Dorthea Dix hospital for the criminally insane. We still have a Dorthea Dix Park.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 10:18 AM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] REL: Q 10

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too - Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody Commodore Grace Hopper Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut) Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky


Becky Lindroos
 

That’s probably appropriate. She’d probably appreciate a mental hospital more than a whole military base. (Heh). How about Major General Marcelite J. Harris then, a black woman from Texas who served from 1965 - 1997. She was the highest-ranking female officer in the Air Force, and the nation’s highest ranking African-American woman in the Department of Defense. She deserves an Air Force base. :-) She died in 2018.

Becky

On Jul 15, 2021, at 7:15 PM, Sandie Kirkland <skirkland@triad.rr.com> wrote:

NC had a Dorthea Dix hospital for the criminally insane. We still have a Dorthea Dix Park.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 10:18 AM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] REL: Q 10

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too - Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody Commodore Grace Hopper Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut) Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky












Sandie Kirkland
 

That's a great suggestion although I'm partial to Grace Hopper.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 10:55 PM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] REL: Q 10

That’s probably appropriate. She’d probably appreciate a mental hospital more than a whole military base. (Heh). How about Major General Marcelite J. Harris then, a black woman from Texas who served from 1965 - 1997. She was the highest-ranking female officer in the Air Force, and the nation’s highest ranking African-American woman in the Department of Defense. She deserves an Air Force base. :-) She died in 2018.

Becky

On Jul 15, 2021, at 7:15 PM, Sandie Kirkland <skirkland@triad.rr.com> wrote:

NC had a Dorthea Dix hospital for the criminally insane. We still have a Dorthea Dix Park.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 10:18 AM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] REL: Q 10

On Jul 13, 2021, at 3:38 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Q 10: Ten army posts honor Confederate generals. Why did the army choose those names? Why does Seidule say they should change them?
Another point here:
The bases, all in former Confederate states, were named with input from locals in the Jim Crow era. The Army courted their buy-in because it needed large swaths of land to build sprawling bases in the early 20th century up through World War II.

I guess if the South is more willing to give up the land for the US bases while the North is not …??? Probably ought not name it a Northern Civil War vet’s name, too.

BUT!!!!

Astronaut names have been suggested and NFL players. How about basketball stars? The military has sports teams. How about Black musicians? The Michael Jackson Military base or the Ice-T Air Base? The military has bands and Ice-T is a vet.

Howsomeever, the military has had great WOMEN, too - Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody Commodore Grace Hopper Colonel Eileen Collins (Air Force - astronaut) Harriet Tubman (yes) - official spy and leader of Montgomery’s raid in South Carolina

There are more listed at:
https://www.military.com/veterans-day/famous-women-veterans.html
(Scroll down a wee bit)

AND!!! Dorthea Dix (1802-1887) served as the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. I’m for this one.

Becky












Jeffrey Taylor
 

My HS was outside of Langley AFB.  Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills.  Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls.  Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class.  When a student hollered wait.  We haven't properly completed the drill yet.  After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.  

I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.  

On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:


I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.)  I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet.  (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)

"Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world

And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down.  My daughter married one of their sons.

My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.

Becky



> On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@...> wrote:
>
> US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.
>
> Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.
>
> Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:
>
> https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html
>
> Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.
>
> Jenny
>







Becky Lindroos
 

LOL! We had bomb alerts where we hid under our desks. And we saw the test warnings on television. In ND we never had anything that I remember. (There was probably something I had no idea of - some siren or something - the television in October 1962 was bad enough.

Do we have anything now? I like the phone alerts.

Becky

On Jul 17, 2021, at 10:33 AM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

My HS was outside of Langley AFB. Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills. Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls. Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class. When a student hollered wait. We haven't properly completed the drill yet. After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.

I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.

On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:


I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.) I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet. (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)

"Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world

And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down. My daughter married one of their sons.

My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.

Becky



On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@comcast.net> wrote:

US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.

Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.

Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:

https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html

Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.

Jenny






Carol Mannchen
 

We have tornado alerts now here in Nashville.  The sirens are tested at noon, the first Saturday of every month.  They go off pretty often, and it is best to pay attention, as the tornadoes are real.  I'm not very good about it, especially now that I don't have a real basement.  

What we really need here in Tennessee is some sort of stupidity alert.  I think the Republicans are trying to kill everybody, especially the children.  They've apparently determined that vaccinations are some sort of liberal plot that should not be encouraged.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 11:52 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
LOL!   We had bomb alerts where we hid under our desks.  And we saw the test warnings on television.  In ND we never had anything that I remember. (There was probably something I had no idea of - some siren or something -  the television in October 1962 was bad enough.   

Do we have anything now?   I like the phone alerts.

Becky


> On Jul 17, 2021, at 10:33 AM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> My HS was outside of Langley AFB.  Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills.  Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls.  Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class.  When a student hollered wait.  We haven't properly completed the drill yet.  After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.
>
> I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.
>
> On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
>
>
> I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.)  I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet.  (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)
>
> "Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
> https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world
>
> And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down.  My daughter married one of their sons.
>
> My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
> > On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@...> wrote:
> >
> > US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.
> >
> > Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.
> >
> > Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:
> >
> > https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html
> >
> > Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.
> >
> > Jenny
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>







Jeffrey Taylor
 

If we had a stupidity alert in Georgia they would shriek constantly.  

On Saturday, July 17, 2021, 03:43:12 PM EDT, Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@...> wrote:


We have tornado alerts now here in Nashville.  The sirens are tested at noon, the first Saturday of every month.  They go off pretty often, and it is best to pay attention, as the tornadoes are real.  I'm not very good about it, especially now that I don't have a real basement.  

What we really need here in Tennessee is some sort of stupidity alert.  I think the Republicans are trying to kill everybody, especially the children.  They've apparently determined that vaccinations are some sort of liberal plot that should not be encouraged.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 11:52 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
LOL!   We had bomb alerts where we hid under our desks.  And we saw the test warnings on television.  In ND we never had anything that I remember. (There was probably something I had no idea of - some siren or something -  the television in October 1962 was bad enough.   

Do we have anything now?   I like the phone alerts.

Becky


> On Jul 17, 2021, at 10:33 AM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> My HS was outside of Langley AFB.  Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills.  Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls.  Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class.  When a student hollered wait.  We haven't properly completed the drill yet.  After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.
>
> I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.
>
> On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
>
>
> I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.)  I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet.  (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)
>
> "Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
> https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world
>
> And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down.  My daughter married one of their sons.
>
> My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
> > On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@...> wrote:
> >
> > US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.
> >
> > Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.
> >
> > Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:
> >
> > https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html
> >
> > Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.
> >
> > Jenny
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>







Becky Lindroos
 

We have alerts every day at noon, 6pm and 10pm. The siren got smashed in the tornado and there was a vote at council about what to do. Folks wanted a siren even if it did cost some money. It’s a tradition - there was the siren when I was growing up.

It’s the same siren as the tornado siren or anything else which needs the town’s attention. I figure the noon siren is for folks going to lunch and the 10 pm siren is for getting the kids in and/or going to bed. I have no idea about the 6pm siren - dinner time and call the kids in? Home from work siren? No idea. It does give a certain rhythm to the day though.

Becky

On Jul 17, 2021, at 4:38 PM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

If we had a stupidity alert in Georgia they would shriek constantly.

On Saturday, July 17, 2021, 03:43:12 PM EDT, Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@gmail.com> wrote:


We have tornado alerts now here in Nashville. The sirens are tested at noon, the first Saturday of every month. They go off pretty often, and it is best to pay attention, as the tornadoes are real. I'm not very good about it, especially now that I don't have a real basement.

What we really need here in Tennessee is some sort of stupidity alert. I think the Republicans are trying to kill everybody, especially the children. They've apparently determined that vaccinations are some sort of liberal plot that should not be encouraged.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@gmail.com
615-310-4504




On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 11:52 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
LOL! We had bomb alerts where we hid under our desks. And we saw the test warnings on television. In ND we never had anything that I remember. (There was probably something I had no idea of - some siren or something - the television in October 1962 was bad enough.

Do we have anything now? I like the phone alerts.

Becky


On Jul 17, 2021, at 10:33 AM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

My HS was outside of Langley AFB. Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills. Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls. Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class. When a student hollered wait. We haven't properly completed the drill yet. After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.

I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.

On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:


I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.) I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet. (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)

"Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world

And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down. My daughter married one of their sons.

My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.

Becky



On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@comcast.net> wrote:

US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.

Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.

Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:

https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html

Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.

Jenny











David Markham
 

The social darwanist in me is aware that the stupid will die off because of their own ignorance while the smart will survive. The key concern is how to not let the stupid take us down with them and if possible, to continue to try to bring them along.

I love the stupid as well as the smart because I believe in the inherent worth and dignity of every person, but that doesn't mean that I am a fool and go along with the ignorant crowd. My faith is that the smart among us will survive and it is their obligation to help their ignorant brothers and sisters as best they can.

Now we take up today's offering. Your checkes and donations are gratefully appreciated. 😉

On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 5:38 PM Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
If we had a stupidity alert in Georgia they would shriek constantly.  

On Saturday, July 17, 2021, 03:43:12 PM EDT, Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@...> wrote:


We have tornado alerts now here in Nashville.  The sirens are tested at noon, the first Saturday of every month.  They go off pretty often, and it is best to pay attention, as the tornadoes are real.  I'm not very good about it, especially now that I don't have a real basement.  

What we really need here in Tennessee is some sort of stupidity alert.  I think the Republicans are trying to kill everybody, especially the children.  They've apparently determined that vaccinations are some sort of liberal plot that should not be encouraged.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 11:52 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
LOL!   We had bomb alerts where we hid under our desks.  And we saw the test warnings on television.  In ND we never had anything that I remember. (There was probably something I had no idea of - some siren or something -  the television in October 1962 was bad enough.   

Do we have anything now?   I like the phone alerts.

Becky


> On Jul 17, 2021, at 10:33 AM, Jeffrey Taylor via groups.io <jatta97=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> My HS was outside of Langley AFB.  Most of my graduating class were military dependents. We had one of the air raid drills.  Everyone was to go outside the classroom to the hall and sit along the walls.  Bell rang and a teacher said drill is over, return to class.  When a student hollered wait.  We haven't properly completed the drill yet.  After the explosion we are supposed to remove all of our external clothing.
>
> I don't think I remember a lot of genuine concern.
>
> On Thursday, July 15, 2021, 06:22:49 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
>
>
> I live about 20-25 miles from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Good name.)  I was living in Fargo when the missile silos went in. They weren’t quite complete when the Cuban Missile crisis happened in 1962 but we were scared we were going to be targeted and bombed off the planet.  (I remember going to school that day - terrified but I got there.)
>
> "Some 5,500 construction workers built 150 underground missile silos and 15 launch control facilities in eastern North Dakota between 1963 and 1966.”
> https://www.grandforksherald.com/news/2050896-north-dakota-missile-sites-living-nuclear-world
>
> And the commanders moved to nice little towns like Northwood and settled down.  My daughter married one of their sons.
>
> My mom got her teaching credential around that time and she had to take a BUNCH of science classes due to the science orientation of ND and the missiles and so on.
>
> Becky
>
>
>
> > On Jul 15, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Jenny Berman Ross <jenny60060@...> wrote:
> >
> > US Military bases are not exclusively located in the South - during WWII a lot of large Military installations were constructed in the center of the country - far enough from the coasts that they could not be hit by a bomb launched form a ship of submarine on the coast. Later during the Cold War, Air Force Bases were strategically located so that long range bombers would be able to fly over the North Pole and attack the USSR, if needed. Air Force Bases were also located in the southwest where good weather permitted lots of training hours in the air for pilots, and planes could be stored outside on the ramp.
> >
> > Locations are strategic and in some cases are selected to meet recruiting needs - the Navy maintained its Recruit Training Center in north eastern Illinois both due to the high cost of moving the facilities to another location and the fact that the majority of the Navy's new recruits come from the center of the country, not the coasts. People will make the final choice of service to join in part based on whether their parents can easily come see them graduate from basic training.
> >
> > Each military service has its own naming conventions. The Navy tends to name its bases after their locations and its ships after people or things. The Air Force names bases after people with a connection either to the Air Force or to the history of Aviation. The Marine Corps names its bases after their locations. The Army names its installations after people with past service in the Army. The Air Force has some facilities named after astronauts and NASA has named some of its facilities after pioneering women in space. Here is a list of suggestions from a Military historian that include some women and quite a few minorities with exemplary records of Military service:
> >
> > https://www.military.com/off-duty/10-much-better-names-army-bases-honoring-confederate-generals.html
> >
> > Other interesting choices would be to name an Army base after the Navajo "code talkers" from WWII or some of the Japanese American troops who fought in the U.S. Army during WWII while their families were in internment camps.
> >
> > Jenny
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>







Becky Lindroos
 

On Jul 17, 2021, at 2:42 PM, Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@gmail.com> wrote:

What we really need here in Tennessee is some sort of stupidity alert. I think the Republicans are trying to kill everybody, especially the children. They've apparently determined that vaccinations are some sort of liberal plot that should not be encouraged.
Nooo… the Republicans and Trumpsters are killing themselves off. And there are a few ultra-liberal anti-vaxxers getting Covid with them.

LA is going on mask mandates again for everyone. Some guy was so pissed off he stuck a big flag coming out of the trunk on his car saying, “Get your ass vaccinated!” LOL!

Becky