REL - Q6


Becky Lindroos
 

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky


Jeffrey Taylor
 

When I was in HS in Virginia during the 60's, it was not a topic for discussion.  Same in Middle Georgia during the 70's.  The details may vary but in broader scope, probably little difference.  When I was in HS I knew there were black schools but I didn't know where any of them were.  There was an American oil refinery near the mouth of the York River and to our west a costal swamp near Poquoson, so you can probably guess where.

In Milledgeville, downtown, there was a white main street and at 90 degrees to it a black main street.  There was a black school in that area which is now a dance studio for Georgia College.

On Friday, July 9, 2021, 02:47:50 PM EDT, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:


• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky







Jenny Berman Ross
 

I grew up in Tempe AZ and in the 70s and early 80s was very aware that school district boundaries were carefully drawn to make sure that each one included a majority minority and low income neighborhood in order to avoid the forced bussing in Phoenix. 

Visiting relatives throughout Texas as a child, it was pretty clear where the boundaries were between the Black and White neighborhoods. In affluent areas, White students went to private schools and the Black students went to public schools.  I have a number of newspapers and book published about the history of different Texas towns and counties that document the segregation and history of White and Black schools, hospitals, and business districts.

When I lived in Newport News, VA, we lived just east of Hilton Village in a neighborhood built after WWII that had never had a Black resident.  

Jenny


34butternut@gmail.com
 

Boston had a single confederate monument, taken down a few years ago and on one of the boston harbor islands. I recently went to the Legacy Memorial in Montgomery AL (also known as the lynching museum). It powerfully and reverently chronicles the victims of lynchings that took place county by county in the US. I don’t believe any MA county was included. Having said that, racism is alive and well here.

When I was growing up, Boston was very segregated racially. Even public housing projects were segregated in the 1960s, though by the time I moved out in 1973 when I got married, that was no longer the case. School busing in the late 60s and early 70s, when it finally became a reality, drained the city of its more affluent white middle class who fled to the suburbs and what they believed were better schools, leaving mostly rich people who could afford private schools, a very small middle class (a lot of cops, city workers and firefighters who had a residency requirement) that mostly shifted to parochial schools (Catholic) and a few anti-busing academies, and the poor, who were pitted against each other, blacks on one side and whites on the other. Both sides lost. My two youngest sisters went to a different high school four years in a row. It was ugly and there were lots of riots and school buses were a focus of ugly racist episodes primarily targeting black kids going to white schools but also white kids going to black schools, as my sisters will attest.

Boston is still known as a racist city both at the individual level and institutionally. The affluent neighborhood I live in has a racist reputation that is not undeserved. For the past year, Black Lives Matter protests have been met with subsequent Blue Lives Matters protests at a nearby traffic rotary. I can always tell when one is occurring because the news station helicopters hover almost directly over my house. It’s changing, but not quickly enough!

As an example of institutional racism that demonstrates critical race theory, Boston has three elite public high schools, including Boston Latin School, the oldest public school in the country, and Boston Latin Academy, where I attended high school when it was called Girls Latin School (it went coed in 1972 after I graduated, but has always been the poor red-headed stepchild to BLS); they require passing a test to attend. They have a disproportionate number of white students when compared to the percentage of black/brown/white students in other city high schools. It doesn’t matter whether white students were better prepared for the tests or the tests were better prepared for white students; the outcome was unjust given the racial makeup of the city. Just this year the school system changed the admissions standards using zip codes as a proxy for race and class. Lawsuits and uproars at public meetings ensued.

Carol

On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky




Sandie Kirkland
 

My city has a current example. Back in November, a gang member was killed. At his funeral, there was a drive-by shooting, thought to be done by a rival gang that fired on the mourners. The funeral was being held outside due to Covid. As people scrambled inside the church to safety, an 18 year old man was shot and killed and it was later revealed that he was shot by an undercover policeman there to investigate the earlier murder. The investigation was handed over to the state authorities and they decided not to press charges. There have been several protest marches since then and the case seems to be heating up rather than dying down.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Friday, July 9, 2021 2:48 PM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: [AllNonfiction] REL - Q6

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky


Becky Lindroos
 

"During the civil unrest[1] that followed the murder of George Floyd in May 2020, a number of monuments and memorials associated with racial injustice were vandalized, destroyed or removed, or commitments to remove them were announced. This occurred mainly in the United States, but also in several other countries."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_monuments_and_memorials_removed_during_the_George_Floyd_protests

On Jul 9, 2021, at 1:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky






Becky Lindroos
 

There were and are no Confederate monuments in the entire state of North Dakota. 
Where else I’ve lived: 
Connecticut has generic markers to the military in various wars and Illinois has no markers but it has a mass grave south of Chicago.  https://chs.org/finding_aides/ransom/townlist.htm
https://patch.com/illinois/across-il/confederate-monuments-illinois-do-they-exist
(6 months in each place)

 So no, there was no similarity regarding race until I moved to Porterville where there is a marker to the Civil War veterans. It's in the cemetery and both sides are included on the one stone. (And I didn’t know about this until I Googled today.)  Tulare county holds a re-enactment in Visalia (or it used to).  I used to see Confederate flags on pick-up trucks.  (California fought on the side of the North but the P'ville was pro-South.) 

 Here’s a photo of our Civil War US (North) Vets taken a few years after the fact. I think the women were probably wives or maybe nurses.

 
Porterville is very pro-military and police and the white population is largely from the Southern states (including Oklahoma) . There are personal military banners attached to the lamp posts the lengths of 5 major thoroughfares.  I’d say there are 12 miles of military banners now and new ones are added every year. 

 Becky 



On Jul 9, 2021, at 1:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky 








34butternut@gmail.com
 

On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky






Becky Lindroos
 

Sandie, I understand giving law enforcement a bit of slack, but I don’t think it should be the free pass it's been for too long. The shooting which got me was the Breonna Taylor shooting where the cops got the wrong house and killer her in her bed. They weren’t even charged with it - charged with what … endangering safety something. (What would have happened to a 34-year old Black man who got the wrong apartment and shot into into it and killed a cop asleep in his bed? - They’re both accidents -

Cops and the military are 1st class citizens plus. Middle-class white men are 2nd class citizens. Poor white men are 3rd class citizens. Poor black men are 4th class citizens. Women are whatever their man is, but with a minus after it. Rich Black men and any mix is very confusing.

Becky

On Jul 9, 2021, at 5:51 PM, Sandie Kirkland <skirkland@triad.rr.com> wrote:

My city has a current example. Back in November, a gang member was killed. At his funeral, there was a drive-by shooting, thought to be done by a rival gang that fired on the mourners. The funeral was being held outside due to Covid. As people scrambled inside the church to safety, an 18 year old man was shot and killed and it was later revealed that he was shot by an undercover policeman there to investigate the earlier murder. The investigation was handed over to the state authorities and they decided not to press charges. There have been several protest marches since then and the case seems to be heating up rather than dying down.

Sandie

-----Original Message-----
From: AllNonfiction@groups.io <AllNonfiction@groups.io> On Behalf Of Becky Lindroos
Sent: Friday, July 9, 2021 2:48 PM
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Subject: [AllNonfiction] REL - Q6

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky











Becky Lindroos
 

Over the years, North Dakota vigilantes have lynched 3 Native Americans, 1 Black man and probably 8 white men for various things including cattle rustling. The Black man’s death got a plaque commemorating the event last year. He’d been in jail for the rape of two white women - a gang of vigilantes got him freed and hung him by the river. He was probably innocent of at least one of the rapes. There as a small crowd to watch the plaque be set.

One of the lynched guys was a sheriff who had attacked a woman.

The Indians were said to have shot a whole family and the reason was the court was too slow - the guilt verdict was being appealed and that was the slowness.

The other guys’ crimes were murder and cattle thieving.

Becky

On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:12 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

There were and are no Confederate monuments in the entire state of North Dakota.
Where else I’ve lived:
Connecticut has generic markers to the military in various wars and Illinois has no markers but it has a mass grave south of Chicago. https://chs.org/finding_aides/ransom/townlist.htm
https://patch.com/illinois/across-il/confederate-monuments-illinois-do-they-exist
(6 months in each place)

So no, there was no similarity regarding race until I moved to Porterville where there is a marker to the Civil War veterans. It's in the cemetery and both sides are included on the one stone. (And I didn’t know about this until I Googled today.) Tulare county holds a re-enactment in Visalia (or it used to). I used to see Confederate flags on pick-up trucks. (California fought on the side of the North but the P'ville was pro-South.)

Here’s a photo of our Civil War US (North) Vets taken a few years after the fact. I think the women were probably wives or maybe nurses.

<48d11ce539ee479cda0a91fc317ccaef.jpeg>

Porterville is very pro-military and police and the white population is largely from the Southern states (including Oklahoma) . There are personal military banners attached to the lamp posts the lengths of 5 major thoroughfares. I’d say there are 12 miles of military banners now and new ones are added every year.

Becky



On Jul 9, 2021, at 1:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky






Becky Lindroos
 

Yup - see that red part in California? That’s Bakersfield to somewhere east of Yosemite.

On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:13 PM, 34butternut@gmail.com wrote:

<212990886_10159340251892629_7026974906834758987_n.jpg>
On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky









Becky Lindroos
 

On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:52 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

The Black man’s death got a plaque commemorating the event last year.
The lynching was in 1888, the plaque was last year during the Black Lives Matter movement - July 13. The lynching was cold and no secret, not hidden:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Thurber

Fwiw, we had a white cop killed by a black man two days after Floyd George was killed. The world was weird. That trial is still going on.

Becky


Merilee Olson
 



On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 8:57 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
Yup - see that red part in California?  That’s Bakersfield to somewhere east of Yosemite.

> On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:13 PM, 34butternut@... wrote:
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>> On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
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>> • Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?
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Becky Lindroos
 

Yes Merilee? Somewhere east of Yosemite and north to maybe Madera or Stockton?

Becky

On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:14 PM, Merilee Olson <merilee.olson@gmail.com> wrote:



On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 8:57 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
Yup - see that red part in California? That’s Bakersfield to somewhere east of Yosemite.

On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:13 PM, 34butternut@gmail.com wrote:

<212990886_10159340251892629_7026974906834758987_n.jpg>
On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky














Carol Mannchen
 

Speaking about Confederate monuments, OMG, do we ever have one, just down the road south of Nashville in Williamson County, near Franklin, TN.  It is absolutely the ugliest monument I have ever seen in my life, and I have done my share of travel.  It's a statue of Nathan Bedford Forest sitting on a horse, brandishing a sword.  It always was ugly, and now it is on private poperty, and it is surrounded by Confederate flags.  A couple of years ago, someone got mad about it and threw pink paint all over it.  You can't even imagine how shameful it is, and nothing was done about the pink paint, either.

I groan every time I have to drive past it, which, fortunately, is not often.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 7:12 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
There were and are no Confederate monuments in the entire state of North Dakota. 
Where else I’ve lived: 
Connecticut has generic markers to the military in various wars and Illinois has no markers but it has a mass grave south of Chicago.  https://chs.org/finding_aides/ransom/townlist.htm
https://patch.com/illinois/across-il/confederate-monuments-illinois-do-they-exist
(6 months in each place)

 So no, there was no similarity regarding race until I moved to Porterville where there is a marker to the Civil War veterans. It's in the cemetery and both sides are included on the one stone. (And I didn’t know about this until I Googled today.)  Tulare county holds a re-enactment in Visalia (or it used to).  I used to see Confederate flags on pick-up trucks.  (California fought on the side of the North but the P'ville was pro-South.) 

 Here’s a photo of our Civil War US (North) Vets taken a few years after the fact. I think the women were probably wives or maybe nurses.

 
Porterville is very pro-military and police and the white population is largely from the Southern states (including Oklahoma) . There are personal military banners attached to the lamp posts the lengths of 5 major thoroughfares.  I’d say there are 12 miles of military banners now and new ones are added every year. 

 Becky 



On Jul 9, 2021, at 1:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:

• Seidule uses his hometown’s tortured racial history as a way to explain his own understanding of race. Does your hometown have a racial past similar or dissimilar to Alexandria, Virginia, and Monroe, Georgia?

Becky 








Michele
 

Yick -- Bakersfield, Part of the armpit of California. Not only racist but hot, desert, and ugly.

Michele

> On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 8:57 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:

> Yup - see that red part in California?  That’s Bakersfield to somewhere east of Yosemite.
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> > <212990886_10159340251892629_7026974906834758987_n.jpg>
> >> On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
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Merilee Olson
 

Accidentally hit send without writing anything🙀

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 9:27 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
Yes Merilee?   Somewhere east of Yosemite and north to maybe Madera or Stockton?

Becky

> On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:14 PM, Merilee Olson <merilee.olson@...> wrote:
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> On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 8:57 PM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
> Yup - see that red part in California?  That’s Bakersfield to somewhere east of Yosemite.
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> > On Jul 9, 2021, at 7:13 PM, 34butternut@... wrote:
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> > <212990886_10159340251892629_7026974906834758987_n.jpg>
> >> On Jul 9, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
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