Confederate monuments as a means of racial subjugation


David Markham
 

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As the historian Karen Cox has noted, a Confederate monument had the same purpose as lynching: enforce white supremacy. It is no coincidence that most Confederate monuments went up between 1890 and 1920, the same period that lynching peaked in the South. Lynching and Confederate monuments served to tell African Americans that they were second-class citizens.40

Seidule, Ty. Robert E. Lee and Me (p. 89). St. Martin's Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

What do you think of Karen Cox’s idea that Confederate monuments enforce white supremacy? Seidule tying together the rise of lynching and the placement of Confederate monuments could be a coincidence and maybe indications of the same mindset meant to intimate and subjugate black Americans in its caste system.

Growing up in Western New York state I never saw any Confederate monuments but occasionally confederate flags. Confederate flags were frequently seen in mobile home parks and the word on the street is that they marked the drug dealers in the park. I don’t know if this is true but I thought it was interesting that those who flew Confederate flags in front of their mobile homes were stigmatized as being outlaws of some type.

David Markham
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Becky Lindroos
 

I’ ve seen plenty of Confederate flags on mobile homes and regular homes (lower income neighborhoods), and trucks and t-shirts and I don’t know where all. Tulare County was IN California but it was OF Oklahoma. You said:
I thought it was interesting that those who flew Confederate flags in front of their mobile homes were stigmatized as being outlaws of some type.
I think they enjoy stigmatizing themselves by doing it. Many of them usually consider themselves “rebels” or “outlaws” anyway. There's a lot of support for that sort of defiance - even at the cop-shop. (Unfortunately.)

Becky


On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:26 PM, David Markham <davidgmarkham@gmail.com> wrote:

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As the historian Karen Cox has noted, a Confederate monument had the same purpose as lynching: enforce white supremacy. It is no coincidence that most Confederate monuments went up between 1890 and 1920, the same period that lynching peaked in the South. Lynching and Confederate monuments served to tell African Americans that they were second-class citizens.40

Seidule, Ty. Robert E. Lee and Me (p. 89). St. Martin's Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

What do you think of Karen Cox’s idea that Confederate monuments enforce white supremacy? Seidule tying together the rise of lynching and the placement of Confederate monuments could be a coincidence and maybe indications of the same mindset meant to intimate and subjugate black Americans in its caste system.

Growing up in Western New York state I never saw any Confederate monuments but occasionally confederate flags. Confederate flags were frequently seen in mobile home parks and the word on the street is that they marked the drug dealers in the park. I don’t know if this is true but I thought it was interesting that those who flew Confederate flags in front of their mobile homes were stigmatized as being outlaws of some type.

David Markham
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Jeffrey Taylor
 

Yes.  Most certainly.

"

The most outspoken political group promoting segregation in the United States was the Dixiecrat political party, who adopted the Confederate flag as their party's symbol in 1948.

Before it was adopted by the Dixiecrats, the flag was not used as a political statement. The only times the Confederate flag was flown were at occasional football games (flown by southern universities), or during Civil War reenactments. However, after the Dixiecrats adopted the flag, others also began to use it to resist desegregation and equality and oppose the Civil Rights Movement.

Let's look at how one state used the Confederate flag, and their intent in doing so."


On Thursday, July 22, 2021, 06:26:16 PM EDT, David Markham <davidgmarkham@...> wrote:


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As the historian Karen Cox has noted, a Confederate monument had the same purpose as lynching: enforce white supremacy. It is no coincidence that most Confederate monuments went up between 1890 and 1920, the same period that lynching peaked in the South. Lynching and Confederate monuments served to tell African Americans that they were second-class citizens.40

Seidule, Ty. Robert E. Lee and Me (p. 89). St. Martin's Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

What do you think of Karen Cox’s idea that Confederate monuments enforce white supremacy? Seidule tying together the rise of lynching and the placement of Confederate monuments could be a coincidence and maybe indications of the same mindset meant to intimate and subjugate black Americans in its caste system.

Growing up in Western New York state I never saw any Confederate monuments but occasionally confederate flags. Confederate flags were frequently seen in mobile home parks and the word on the street is that they marked the drug dealers in the park. I don’t know if this is true but I thought it was interesting that those who flew Confederate flags in front of their mobile homes were stigmatized as being outlaws of some type.

David Markham
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