Becky's June Reads


Becky Lindroos
 

I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.

CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating: 8/A-: comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****

A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating: B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****

The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating: B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.

*****

When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****

The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****

Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****

When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy. This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****

Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me). A very good book - very.
*****

GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****

Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating: 9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange. In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school, but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****

NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in. I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935. But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult. So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****

Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point. He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****

The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out. There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****

Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)

Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet. He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******

Becky


Becky Lindroos
 

Oops - wrong group -

Becky

On Jul 1, 2021, at 12:33 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.

CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating: 8/A-: comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****

A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating: B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****

The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating: B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.

*****

When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****

The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****

Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****

When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy. This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****

Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me). A very good book - very.
*****

GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****

Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating: 9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange. In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school, but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****

NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in. I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935. But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult. So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****

Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point. He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****

The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out. There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****

Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)

Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet. He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******

Becky




johannakurz
 

In preperation of my Denmark trip in August and September with my face to face literature group, I am reading a lot books by Danish writers. I started last month with thrillers by Adler- Olsen, this month with thrillers by Karen Vad Brunn and Benni Bodker, who are actually a couple. I pulled out writings from Sören Kiergegaard, also a thriller by Peter Hoeg... Miss Smillas Gespuer fuer Schnee...don't know the Englush title right now. Then I read short stories by Blixen, fairy tales by Anderson...I also will read his autobiography and some travel books.and last but not least...for July, I will read short stories and novels by the 1917 Literature Nobel prize winners Pontoppidan and Giellerup..
In between I read Underland and Immanuel Kant...und?

Johanna



Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...>
Datum: 01.07.21 19:33 (GMT+01:00)
An: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Betreff: [AllNonfiction] Becky's June Reads

I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.

CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating:  8/A-:  comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****

A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating:  B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****

The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating:  B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.

*****

When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****

The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****

Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****

When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy.  This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****

Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me).  A very good book - very.
*****

GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****

Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating:  9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange.  In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school,  but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****

NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in.  I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935.  But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult.  So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****

Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point.  He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****

The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out.  There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****

Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)

Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet.  He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and  north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******

Becky





Magda
 

Why wrong group? Thank you for these!:)
Project Hail Mary is on my TBR list. I really enjoyed the Martian.
I might try to read the Finnish comic detective story. I’m in need of some humour right now:)
Magda

On Jul 1, 2021, at 1:37 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Oops - wrong group -

Becky

On Jul 1, 2021, at 12:33 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.
CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating: 8/A-: comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****
A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating: B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****
The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating: B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.
*****
When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****
The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****
Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****
When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy. This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****
Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me). A very good book - very.
*****
GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****
Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating: 9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange. In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school, but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****
NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in. I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935. But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult. So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****
Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point. He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****
The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out. There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****
Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)
Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet. He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******
Becky



Merilee Olson
 

Kierkegaard and Adler-Olsen. What a combo😂I’m just finishing my first Adler-Olsen, The Keeper of Lost Causes.  Love the main character, but some of the scenes are pretty creepy.  Read Smilla’s Sense of Snow years ago.  You should watch the series, Borgen.

On Thu, Jul 1, 2021 at 2:37 PM johannakurz <johannakurz@...> wrote:
In preperation of my Denmark trip in August and September with my face to face literature group, I am reading a lot books by Danish writers. I started last month with thrillers by Adler- Olsen, this month with thrillers by Karen Vad Brunn and Benni Bodker, who are actually a couple. I pulled out writings from Sören Kiergegaard, also a thriller by Peter Hoeg... Miss Smillas Gespuer fuer Schnee...don't know the Englush title right now. Then I read short stories by Blixen, fairy tales by Anderson...I also will read his autobiography and some travel books.and last but not least...for July, I will read short stories and novels by the 1917 Literature Nobel prize winners Pontoppidan and Giellerup..
In between I read Underland and Immanuel Kant...und?

Johanna



Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...>
Datum: 01.07.21 19:33 (GMT+01:00)
Betreff: [AllNonfiction] Becky's June Reads

I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.

CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating:  8/A-:  comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****

A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating:  B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****

The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating:  B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.

*****

When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****

The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****

Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****

When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy.  This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****

Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me).  A very good book - very.
*****

GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****

Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating:  9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange.  In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school,  but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****

NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in.  I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935.  But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult.  So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****

Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point.  He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****

The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out.  There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****

Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)

Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet.  He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and  north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******

Becky





Becky Lindroos
 

I enjoy Scandic-thriller stuff and Miss Smilla’s Sense of Snow is wonderful. (The Danish title is "Smilla’s *Feeling* for Snow,” but that didn’t work too well.) And Adler-Olso is great and I’ve read all of that series about the Lost Causes. Super characters. I don’t think I’ve read any of the others except for Blixen and Anderson.

You could also go see Babette's Feast which I dearly love. :-) That was set in Denmark and won an Oscar for best Foreign Language film (198?)

Becky

On Jul 1, 2021, at 1:37 PM, johannakurz <johannakurz@t-online.de> wrote:

In preperation of my Denmark trip in August and September with my face to face literature group, I am reading a lot books by Danish writers. I started last month with thrillers by Adler- Olsen, this month with thrillers by Karen Vad Brunn and Benni Bodker, who are actually a couple. I pulled out writings from Sören Kiergegaard, also a thriller by Peter Hoeg... Miss Smillas Gespuer fuer Schnee...don't know the Englush title right now. Then I read short stories by Blixen, fairy tales by Anderson...I also will read his autobiography and some travel books.and last but not least...for July, I will read short stories and novels by the 1917 Literature Nobel prize winners Pontoppidan and Giellerup..
In between I read Underland and Immanuel Kant...und?

Johanna



Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net>
Datum: 01.07.21 19:33 (GMT+01:00)
An: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Betreff: [AllNonfiction] Becky's June Reads

I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.

CRIME (Sci-fi):
The Man Who Died
by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
Rating: 8/A-: comic literary crime
Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
*****

A Gentleman’s Murder
by Christopher Huang
Rating: B+ / historical mystery
Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
*****

The Mysterious Affair at Styles
by Agatha Christie
1916 / (2021)
Rating: B+ / puzzler classic
It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.

*****

When These Mountains Burn
by David Joy –
2020
Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
*****

The Last
by Hanna Jameson
2019
Rating: C; dystopian crime
This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
*****

Some Choose Darkness
By Charlie Doniea
Rating B+ / crime-procedural
Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
*****

When She Was Helen
by Caroline B. Cooney
2021 /
Rating: A / crime
A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy. This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
*****

Project Hail Mary
by Andy Weir – 2021
Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me). A very good book - very.
*****

GENERAL FICTION:
Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
2017 – 344 pages
Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
*****

Antiquities
by Cynthia Ozick
Rating: 9.5 (a novella)
/ historical fiction
Beautiful but a bit strange. In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school, but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
*****

NONFICTION:
Letters to Camondo
By Edmund de Waal
Rating – 9.25 / art history
(Both read and listened)
Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in. I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935. But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult. So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
*****

Robert E Lee and Me:
A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
By Ty Seidule
Rating – 10 / history / memoir
(both read and listened)
Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point. He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
*****

The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
By John Dickie
2020 / 490 pages
Rating: 9.75 / history
(Both read and listened)
Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out. There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
*****

Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
By Robert Macfarlane
Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
(Both read and listened)

Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet. He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
*******

Becky





johannakurz
 

Thank you Becky, I will look into it and see whether I can get the film....yes, and I also watch a lot of films from Lars von Trier too.

Johanna



Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...>
Datum: 01.07.21 23:16 (GMT+01:00)
An: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Betreff: Re: [AllNonfiction] Becky's June Reads

I enjoy Scandic-thriller stuff and Miss Smilla’s Sense of Snow is wonderful.  (The Danish title is "Smilla’s *Feeling* for Snow,” but that didn’t work too well.)  And Adler-Olso is great and I’ve read all of that series about the Lost Causes.  Super characters.  I don’t think I’ve read any of the others except for Blixen and Anderson.

You could also go see Babette's Feast which I dearly love.  :-)  That was set in Denmark and won an Oscar for best Foreign Language film (198?)

Becky



> On Jul 1, 2021, at 1:37 PM, johannakurz <johannakurz@...> wrote:
>
> In preperation of my Denmark trip in August and September with my face to face literature group, I am reading a lot books by Danish writers. I started last month with thrillers by Adler- Olsen, this month with thrillers by Karen Vad Brunn and Benni Bodker, who are actually a couple. I pulled out writings from Sören Kiergegaard, also a thriller by Peter Hoeg... Miss Smillas Gespuer fuer Schnee...don't know the Englush title right now. Then I read short stories by Blixen, fairy tales by Anderson...I also will read his autobiography and some travel books.and last but not least...for July, I will read short stories and novels by the 1917 Literature Nobel prize winners Pontoppidan and Giellerup..
> In between I read Underland and Immanuel Kant...und?
>
> Johanna
>
>
>
> Von meinem/meiner Galaxy gesendet
>
>
> -------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
> Von: Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...>
> Datum: 01.07.21 19:33 (GMT+01:00)
> An: AllNonfiction@groups.io
> Betreff: [AllNonfiction] Becky's June Reads
>
> I had a pretty good month - 14 books read with 7 crime novels and 1 sci-fi, 2 general fiction, and 4 nonfiction. There were 4 women authors and 1 was a translation from Finnish.
>
> CRIME (Sci-fi):
> The Man Who Died
> by Antti Tuomainen (Finnish)
> Rating:  8/A-:  comic literary crime
> Crazy mystery dealing with "who is trying to kill the Jaako Kaunismaa, the 1st person narrator?”
> *****
>
> A Gentleman’s Murder
> by Christopher Huang
> Rating:  B+ / historical mystery
> Old fashioned who-done-it but too many characters and a lot of stuff happening.
> *****
>
> The Mysterious Affair at Styles
> by Agatha Christie
> 1916 / (2021)
> Rating:  B+ / puzzler classic
> It held up quite well so it was fun. Part of it was the June Challenge - there was some legal drama in there.
>
> *****
>
> When These Mountains Burn
> by David Joy –
> 2020
> Rating: 9.5 /A+ : literary crime
> Powerful story of drugs and change in western North Carolina -
> *****
>
> The Last
> by Hanna Jameson
> 2019
> Rating: C; dystopian crime
> This is kind of typical dystopian fiction except that there is murder in the Swiss hotel which is isolated after world nuclear devastation.
> *****
>
> Some Choose Darkness
> By Charlie Doniea
> Rating B+ / crime-procedural
> Cold case serial killer brings a “sensitive" policewoman (who is also an attorney) to reconstruct the case.
> *****
>
> When She Was Helen
> by Caroline B. Cooney
> 2021 /
> Rating: A / crime
> A retirement community has a somewhat mysterious resident so Clemmie goes to check on him and he’s more than “somewhat” mysterious - he’s creepy.  This seems light but there are twists into being a more thriller type book.
> *****
>
> Project Hail Mary
> by Andy Weir – 2021
> Read by Ray Porter – 16h 10m
> Rating: A+ / Sci-Fi
> Sci-fi without space drama (interstellar warfare). It’s at least as good as The Martian - Lots of science for dummies (like me).  A very good book - very.
> *****
>
> GENERAL FICTION:
> Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann
> 2017 – 344 pages
> Translation by Ross Benjamin 2020
> Read by Firdus Bamji – 11h 57m
> Rating – 8.5 / historical fiction
> Tyll is a folklorish character who comes alive in this novel of the Late Middle Ages 16th century Germany. There’s a strand of magical realism going through it.
> *****
>
> Antiquities
> by Cynthia Ozick
> Rating:  9.5 (a novella)
> / historical fiction
> Beautiful but a bit strange.  In 1949, 7 old men are leaving their posts as trustees of a boys’ school which was closed in 1915. These 7 are supposed to write memoirs of their days at the school,  but we only get the one - it’s 87 pages long. That generation had different ideas about some hot issues today.
> *****
>
> NONFICTION:
> Letters to Camondo
> By Edmund de Waal
> Rating – 9.25 / art history
> (Both read and listened)
> Edmund de Waal, the author of The Hare with the Amber Eyes, is also the 1st person narrator of this wonderful book which is somewhere between fiction and nonfiction history with a bit of memoir stuck in.  I’d personally call it art history because the only make-believe thing about it is that de Waal is writing letters to Moise Camondo who died in Paris in 1935.  But he never gets any kind of response physically or emotionally or mentally or occult.  So de Waal is the author who presents us a lot of information which is nicely footnoted and we’re given a bibliography of sorts.
> If you happen to buy this get the Kindle or print edition because there are gorgeous photographs of the Camondo mansion which Moise turned into a museum in honor of his son and gave to France when Moise died.
> *****
>
> Robert E Lee and Me:
> A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause
> By Ty Seidule
> Rating – 10 / history / memoir
> (both read and listened)
> Ty Seidule is the history chair at West Point.  He was raised in the South which mythologized Robert E. Lee. During Seidule's tenure at West Point he got tired of honoring what he calls a traitor to the US and spoke his mind then wrote a book and made a video. It’s excellent and not what historians usually do.
> *****
>
> The Craft: How Freemason’s Made the Modern World
> By John Dickie
> 2020 / 490 pages
> Rating: 9.75 / history
> (Both read and listened)
> Interesting study of the Freemasons from Scotland and France and England to nowadays all over the world, but dying out.  There’s a lot of misinformation about them as well as scandals and propaganda. Dickie’s account seems pretty well balanced.
> *****
>
> Underland: A Deep Time Journey x2
> By Robert Macfarlane
> Read by Matthew Waterson 12h 3m
> Rating: 8.75 - geology /travelogue
> (Both read and listened)
>
> Macfarlane studies and meditates on what all is under our feet.  He goes to places like the Epping Forest in England and the Paris tunnels and there’s Slovenia and  north to what’s under Norway and Greenland.
> *******
>
> Becky
>
>
>
>
>