Date   

Re: Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Merilee Olson
 

😹😹😹

On Sat, Oct 16, 2021 at 10:54 PM Michele via groups.io <missshellbelle=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
btw, since it's only .99, I did buy it, even though I will never read it.   :-)

Michele


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Harris <jameswallaceharris@...>
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Oct 16, 2021 6:49 pm
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

What the hell, for 99 cents. 

I'm reading Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford. There are places where she reminds me of Wodehouse.

I've been watch Wodehouse in Exile on Amazon Prime, a fictionalized story about his time in Germany during the war. Some people considered him a collaborator. I think this movie is trying to show he was clueless and the Nazis just manipulated him. What do y'all know?

Jim


Re: Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Merilee Olson
 

I saw that doc on tv a few years ago. Quite surprising.Ithink he was probably naive, but what do I know.

On Sat, Oct 16, 2021 at 9:49 PM Jim Harris <jameswallaceharris@...> wrote:
What the hell, for 99 cents. 

I'm reading Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford. There are places where she reminds me of Wodehouse.

I've been watch Wodehouse in Exile on Amazon Prime, a fictionalized story about his time in Germany during the war. Some people considered him a collaborator. I think this movie is trying to show he was clueless and the Nazis just manipulated him. What do y'all know?

Jim


Re: Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Michele
 

btw, since it's only .99, I did buy it, even though I will never read it.   :-)

Michele


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Harris <jameswallaceharris@...>
To: AllNonfiction@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Oct 16, 2021 6:49 pm
Subject: Re: [AllNonfiction] Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

What the hell, for 99 cents. 

I'm reading Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford. There are places where she reminds me of Wodehouse.

I've been watch Wodehouse in Exile on Amazon Prime, a fictionalized story about his time in Germany during the war. Some people considered him a collaborator. I think this movie is trying to show he was clueless and the Nazis just manipulated him. What do y'all know?

Jim


Re: Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Jim Harris
 

What the hell, for 99 cents. 

I'm reading Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford. There are places where she reminds me of Wodehouse.

I've been watch Wodehouse in Exile on Amazon Prime, a fictionalized story about his time in Germany during the war. Some people considered him a collaborator. I think this movie is trying to show he was clueless and the Nazis just manipulated him. What do y'all know?

Jim


Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Merilee Olson
 

Check out "The Ultimate Wodehouse Collection" by P.G. Wodehouse.

Got this for $1 on amazon. 4700 pages!
https://a.co/giNdfmE


Re: Cave chamber closed for 40,000 years could hold the key to the lives of Neanderthals | CNN Travel

Magda
 

Very exciting! This, and the previous Neanderthal news too. Thank you!

Magda

On Oct 14, 2021, at 9:36 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

Yrs, there is some info already in the article.

On October 13, 2021, at 6:21 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Oh my - 40,000 years! That will be interesting to find out what’s in there - I’ll bet reports are coming out.

Becky


On Oct 13, 2021, at 6:55 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

And yet more cool Neanderthal stuff... We'll need a new book soon!

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/neanderthals-cave-gibraltar-scn-scli-intl/?hpt=ob_blogfooterold













Re: Are you flexible about your assumptive world?

Merilee Olson
 

And I like to cook and eat new stuff all the time.

On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 11:32 AM Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@...> wrote:
Your talk about ordering the same food reminded me of my trip with my grandson.  Every night he had caesar salad and salmon.  A couple of nights, we talked him into getting something else, and he was not happy with it.  We ate in the pizza restaurant several times -- always the same pizza for both of us.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 10:00 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
Over the years I’ve discovered that I’m fine with change so long as I’m the one in control of it.  If something happens for some reason and is a surprise to me I usually fight it.   I can barely bring myself to go out to dinner if I’d been semi-planning on spending the evening at home. 

On the other hand,  if I’m the one who thinks Applebees sounds good I’m all for it.  I usually like to know things ahead of time though.  I think about a change (even of dinner plans) for a long time before I make that change known.   

I know this is dreadful, but my one granddaughter is exactly the same way and I understand her.  My mom, daughter and the other granddaughter are very spontaneous.  My son and son-in-law can be either way.  A lot of this scenario is laziness.  I’m far better if the change of plans means we stay home instead of going Red Lobster. 

Menu changes have nothing to do with laziness - I’m already at the restaurant. Still - I tend to order the same old thing and if that's not on the menu anymore (because the last time I was there was a couple years ago) it is really hard to pick something else. I want my chiles relleno!  I do NOT want to try the chile verde here. 

My niece used to only eat white food but she outgrew it in her teens and now is simply vegan. 

Becky

> On Oct 15, 2021, at 8:40 AM, David Markham <davidgmarkham@...> wrote:
>
> <image.gif>
> …Kanner wrote that children with autism become agitated when seeing or hearing anything that deviates from the “photographic and phonographic details” of their memories.

> Small, Scott A.. Forgetting (p. 42). Crown.

> A phrase used to describe this phenomenon wherein a person is distressed by change is “assumptive worlds.” We all have assumptions about how things should be. We like order and predictability. The question is how rigidly attached people are to their assumptive worlds as compared to how flexible? A “catastrophe” for one person might be described as a “surprise” to others.

> We are living in a time where our assumptive worlds have been significantly challenged by the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change, political struggles, and even the idea that there is such a thing as truth and that it matters.

> Small’s point seems to be that forgetting contributes to flexibility and resilience while eidetic memory contributes to rigidity and resulting stress and trauma.

> How well do you manage change? How well do you handle surprises and the unexpected? Forgetting appears to be something which contributes to increased resilience in functioning. What do you think of this idea?
>
>
>







Re: Are you flexible about your assumptive world?

Carol Mannchen
 

Your talk about ordering the same food reminded me of my trip with my grandson.  Every night he had caesar salad and salmon.  A couple of nights, we talked him into getting something else, and he was not happy with it.  We ate in the pizza restaurant several times -- always the same pizza for both of us.

Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 10:00 AM Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@...> wrote:
Over the years I’ve discovered that I’m fine with change so long as I’m the one in control of it.  If something happens for some reason and is a surprise to me I usually fight it.   I can barely bring myself to go out to dinner if I’d been semi-planning on spending the evening at home. 

On the other hand,  if I’m the one who thinks Applebees sounds good I’m all for it.  I usually like to know things ahead of time though.  I think about a change (even of dinner plans) for a long time before I make that change known.   

I know this is dreadful, but my one granddaughter is exactly the same way and I understand her.  My mom, daughter and the other granddaughter are very spontaneous.  My son and son-in-law can be either way.  A lot of this scenario is laziness.  I’m far better if the change of plans means we stay home instead of going Red Lobster. 

Menu changes have nothing to do with laziness - I’m already at the restaurant. Still - I tend to order the same old thing and if that's not on the menu anymore (because the last time I was there was a couple years ago) it is really hard to pick something else. I want my chiles relleno!  I do NOT want to try the chile verde here. 

My niece used to only eat white food but she outgrew it in her teens and now is simply vegan. 

Becky

> On Oct 15, 2021, at 8:40 AM, David Markham <davidgmarkham@...> wrote:
>
> <image.gif>
> …Kanner wrote that children with autism become agitated when seeing or hearing anything that deviates from the “photographic and phonographic details” of their memories.

> Small, Scott A.. Forgetting (p. 42). Crown.

> A phrase used to describe this phenomenon wherein a person is distressed by change is “assumptive worlds.” We all have assumptions about how things should be. We like order and predictability. The question is how rigidly attached people are to their assumptive worlds as compared to how flexible? A “catastrophe” for one person might be described as a “surprise” to others.

> We are living in a time where our assumptive worlds have been significantly challenged by the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change, political struggles, and even the idea that there is such a thing as truth and that it matters.

> Small’s point seems to be that forgetting contributes to flexibility and resilience while eidetic memory contributes to rigidity and resulting stress and trauma.

> How well do you manage change? How well do you handle surprises and the unexpected? Forgetting appears to be something which contributes to increased resilience in functioning. What do you think of this idea?
>
>
>







Re: Are you flexible about your assumptive world?

Becky Lindroos
 

Over the years I’ve discovered that I’m fine with change so long as I’m the one in control of it. If something happens for some reason and is a surprise to me I usually fight it. I can barely bring myself to go out to dinner if I’d been semi-planning on spending the evening at home.

On the other hand, if I’m the one who thinks Applebees sounds good I’m all for it. I usually like to know things ahead of time though. I think about a change (even of dinner plans) for a long time before I make that change known.

I know this is dreadful, but my one granddaughter is exactly the same way and I understand her. My mom, daughter and the other granddaughter are very spontaneous. My son and son-in-law can be either way. A lot of this scenario is laziness. I’m far better if the change of plans means we stay home instead of going Red Lobster.

Menu changes have nothing to do with laziness - I’m already at the restaurant. Still - I tend to order the same old thing and if that's not on the menu anymore (because the last time I was there was a couple years ago) it is really hard to pick something else. I want my chiles relleno! I do NOT want to try the chile verde here.

My niece used to only eat white food but she outgrew it in her teens and now is simply vegan.

Becky

On Oct 15, 2021, at 8:40 AM, David Markham <davidgmarkham@gmail.com> wrote:

<image.gif>
…Kanner wrote that children with autism become agitated when seeing or hearing anything that deviates from the “photographic and phonographic details” of their memories.

Small, Scott A.. Forgetting (p. 42). Crown.

A phrase used to describe this phenomenon wherein a person is distressed by change is “assumptive worlds.” We all have assumptions about how things should be. We like order and predictability. The question is how rigidly attached people are to their assumptive worlds as compared to how flexible? A “catastrophe” for one person might be described as a “surprise” to others.

We are living in a time where our assumptive worlds have been significantly challenged by the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change, political struggles, and even the idea that there is such a thing as truth and that it matters.

Small’s point seems to be that forgetting contributes to flexibility and resilience while eidetic memory contributes to rigidity and resulting stress and trauma.

How well do you manage change? How well do you handle surprises and the unexpected? Forgetting appears to be something which contributes to increased resilience in functioning. What do you think of this idea?



Are you flexible about your assumptive world?

David Markham
 

image.gif 

…Kanner wrote that children with autism become agitated when seeing or hearing anything that deviates from the “photographic and phonographic details” of their memories.

 

Small, Scott A.. Forgetting (p. 42). Crown. 

 

A phrase used to describe this phenomenon wherein a person is distressed by change is “assumptive worlds.” We all have assumptions about how things should be. We like order and predictability. The question is how rigidly attached people are to their assumptive worlds as compared to how flexible? A “catastrophe” for one person might be described as a “surprise” to others.

 

We are living in a time where our assumptive worlds have been significantly challenged by the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change, political struggles, and even the idea that there is such a thing as truth and that it matters.

 

Small’s point seems to be that forgetting contributes to flexibility and resilience while eidetic memory contributes to rigidity and resulting stress and trauma.

 

How well do you manage change? How well do you handle surprises and the unexpected? Forgetting appears to be something which contributes to increased resilience in functioning. What do you think of this idea?



Re: Cave chamber closed for 40,000 years could hold the key to the lives of Neanderthals | CNN Travel

Jeanne
 

Yrs, there is some info already in the article.

On October 13, 2021, at 6:21 PM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Oh my - 40,000 years! That will be interesting to find out what’s in there - I’ll bet reports are coming out.

Becky


On Oct 13, 2021, at 6:55 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

And yet more cool Neanderthal stuff... We'll need a new book soon!

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/neanderthals-cave-gibraltar-scn-scli-intl/?hpt=ob_blogfooterold




Re: Cave chamber closed for 40,000 years could hold the key to the lives of Neanderthals | CNN Travel

Jeffrey Taylor
 

The past is always changing. 

On Wednesday, October 13, 2021, 07:55:35 PM EDT, Jeanne <soul121@...> wrote:


And yet more cool Neanderthal stuff... We'll need a new book soon!






Re: Cave chamber closed for 40,000 years could hold the key to the lives of Neanderthals | CNN Travel

Becky Lindroos
 

Oh my - 40,000 years! That will be interesting to find out what’s in there - I’ll bet reports are coming out.

Becky

On Oct 13, 2021, at 6:55 PM, Jeanne <soul121@gmail.com> wrote:

And yet more cool Neanderthal stuff... We'll need a new book soon!

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/neanderthals-cave-gibraltar-scn-scli-intl/?hpt=ob_blogfooterold




Cave chamber closed for 40,000 years could hold the key to the lives of Neanderthals | CNN Travel

Jeanne
 

And yet more cool Neanderthal stuff... We'll need a new book soon!

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/neanderthals-cave-gibraltar-scn-scli-intl/?hpt=ob_blogfooterold


Re: Forgetting - Q4

Herbert Lewis
 


I take the question to be limited to the cognitive functions of the brain and not (e.g.) those involved with managing the autonomous bodily functions.  By cognition I mean intellectual processes such as perception, attention, learning, memory, evaluation, judgment, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, calculating, use of language, etc.  These processes typically both use stored knowledge and create new knowledge.

Brains are enormously "better than computers" because the former in humans are capable of creating minds while the latter are not.  Minds are capable of producing various mental phenomenon such as experiences, pains, beliefs, desires, emotions, etc.  Computers cannot perform any of these functions.

There are four mental capabilities unique to human minds which, in principle, can never be replicated by computers:  Consciousness - Humans are sentient and/or aware of internal and external existence.  Computers are not and, in any conceivable manifestation, are not and never can be.  Intentionality - Mental states are about objects;  they're directed to some state of affairs.  Computers execute programs containing instructions operating on data without any awareness of what that data might represent.  Subjectivity - Human minds have agency which means that they can initiate actions or wield power over some other entity without having been instructed to do so by some other entity.  Also the term is used to represent information, ideas, situations, or physical things which can only be considered true from the perspective of a subject.  Computers do not have this sort of independence.  Mental Causation - Human minds can initiate a flow of events in which those causes cannot be traced to any necessary and sufficient cause(s).

Computers are tools capable of a limited number of computational faculties far exceeding those of human minds.  Those faculties can and are being used to the enormous benefit of humans.  In that they serve as vast improvements over certain equivalent limited human functions.  One analogy might be transportation in which the power of human movement is far exceeded by "trains, planes, and automobiles."  Nonetheless, just like computers, these "tools" are useless inert objects unless there are humans to operate them.


Re: Forgetting - sleep ?

Becky Lindroos
 

On Oct 13, 2021, at 12:31 AM, Becky Lindroos <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Discuss the role sleep and dreaming play in forgetting. How is memory affected with less sleep? (118)
Today I put my phone in the trash because I hadn’t had enough sleep. I’d been getting about 3-4 hours of sleep for a few nights. So my head gets all full of too much stuff going on in the day and I need sleep.

Tonight the sleeping pill worked for about 3 hours. Then I woke up for awhile and went back to sleep. Now I’m going to go back to sleep again and hopefully sleep another 3 hours. I’m a very light sleeper and I think if there’s a loud pickup out in the street it wakes me up.

I’m a lot better when I’m getting enough sleep and that seems to increase with age.

I think I dream but when I get really tired I don’t always get that. I enjoy dreaming.

I fight sleep. I guess I think of it as a mini-death.

Becky


Forgetting - sleep ?

Becky Lindroos
 

Discuss the role sleep and dreaming play in forgetting. How is memory affected with less sleep? (118)

Becky


Re: How catching birds bare-handed may hint at Neandertals’ hunting tactics | Science News

Merilee Olson
 

Interesting! Is used to sub to Science News but got Soooo behind.


Re: How catching birds bare-handed may hint at Neandertals’ hunting tactics | Science News

Jeffrey Taylor
 

Very interesting.  Thank you.


How catching birds bare-handed may hint at Neandertals’ hunting tactics | Science News

Jeanne
 

1361 - 1380 of 22220