Topics

Recompile for Linux.

Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS
 

Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.

Murry B <murraybr@...>
 

I run it under Wine and works great
VE9MB

On 12/12/2018 03:54 PM, k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:
 

Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.


Lynn Deffenbaugh
 

APRSISCE/32 is written directly to the Win32 API.  There is no portability or insulation layer that would allow cross-compilation for *nix.

There are many folks out there successfully running APRSIS32 under WINE, even running IGates with serial-connected TNCs under WINE.  Please see the Wiki link below for more information.


Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32

On 12/12/2018 2:54 PM, k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.

Rob Giuliano
 

I've been running it in "straight WINE" for a very long time.

 
Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO



From: "k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 2:55 PM
Subject: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.


Greg D
 

Also running it here for something like a decade.  Very stable.

What sort of failure are you having?

Greg  KO6TH


Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:

 
I've been running it in "straight WINE" for a very long time.

 
Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO



From: "k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 2:55 PM
Subject: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.



Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS
 

Just trying to get things going. Sure could use some help from whom ever wants to get me through it. I have some working knowledge of linux. I'm currently running Mint Tara and have installed Play on Linux so.. ready too roll from here. I have a fully configured version running my Igate on windows.. What I would like to do is just grab that full dir off the windows box and pop it into the linux box and then go through and config the ports and get it up and running. Thanks in advance. If you want to talk me through it I can call U or U can call me and guide me through it. Anywho.. thats where i'm at,

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 2:12:05 PM MST, Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

Also running it here for something like a decade.  Very stable.

What sort of failure are you having?

Greg  KO6TH


Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
 
I've been running it in "straight WINE" for a very long time.

 
Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO



From: "k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 2:55 PM
Subject: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.



Greg D
 

Check out the link that Rob provided to the instructions.  The key to making it work is adding the registry settings, otherwise ARPSIS32 won't see any serial ports to connect to a TNC.  Even without the settings, you should have Internet-provided packets delivered in real time, just by firing up the software and getting your initial location set..

I'm not familiar with Mint Tara specifically, but just make sure you have the Wine package loaded.  Then go to the folder where APRSIS32 has been extracted and run 'wine aprsis32.exe' from the command line, and you should be off and running.  Copying the configuration file (aprsis32.xml) is probably not a good idea, since it contains paths to things that won't match up on your Linux box (at least, not without a lot of fiddling).  The maps can be copied, if you're careful, but since they self-load, it may not be worth the trouble unless you're running without an Internet connection or have severely limited bandwidth.

Good luck!

Greg  KO6TH


Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:

 
Just trying to get things going. Sure could use some help from whom ever wants to get me through it. I have some working knowledge of linux. I'm currently running Mint Tara and have installed Play on Linux so.. ready too roll from here. I have a fully configured version running my Igate on windows.. What I would like to do is just grab that full dir off the windows box and pop it into the linux box and then go through and config the ports and get it up and running. Thanks in advance. If you want to talk me through it I can call U or U can call me and guide me through it. Anywho.. thats where i'm at,

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 2:12:05 PM MST, Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

Also running it here for something like a decade.  Very stable.

What sort of failure are you having?

Greg  KO6TH


Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
 
I've been running it in "straight WINE" for a very long time.

 
Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO



From: "k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 2:55 PM
Subject: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.




Greg D
 

Oops, typing too fast...  Not tried Play, but if it's based on Wine, it should work.  That said, the registry stuff might be interesting, depending on how they manage it.

If all else fails, I'd just drop back to straight Wine, and go from there.

Greg  KO6TH


Greg D wrote:

Check out the link that Rob provided to the instructions.  The key to making it work is adding the registry settings, otherwise ARPSIS32 won't see any serial ports to connect to a TNC.  Even without the settings, you should have Internet-provided packets delivered in real time, just by firing up the software and getting your initial location set..

I'm not familiar with Mint Tara specifically, but just make sure you have the Wine package loaded.  Then go to the folder where APRSIS32 has been extracted and run 'wine aprsis32.exe' from the command line, and you should be off and running.  Copying the configuration file (aprsis32.xml) is probably not a good idea, since it contains paths to things that won't match up on your Linux box (at least, not without a lot of fiddling).  The maps can be copied, if you're careful, but since they self-load, it may not be worth the trouble unless you're running without an Internet connection or have severely limited bandwidth.

Good luck!

Greg  KO6TH


Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:
 
Just trying to get things going. Sure could use some help from whom ever wants to get me through it. I have some working knowledge of linux. I'm currently running Mint Tara and have installed Play on Linux so.. ready too roll from here. I have a fully configured version running my Igate on windows.. What I would like to do is just grab that full dir off the windows box and pop it into the linux box and then go through and config the ports and get it up and running. Thanks in advance. If you want to talk me through it I can call U or U can call me and guide me through it. Anywho.. thats where i'm at,

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 2:12:05 PM MST, Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

Also running it here for something like a decade.  Very stable.

What sort of failure are you having?

Greg  KO6TH


Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
 
I've been running it in "straight WINE" for a very long time.

 
Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO



From: "k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 2:55 PM
Subject: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Hello. I don't remember if I have asked this before but.. What's the chance of porting the software out to Linux?. I have tried to use it via crossover or play on Linux and have not had any luck. I'm trying to get away from windblows all together but not being able to get the software to work correctly is about the only thing keeping me on windblows. Any way i'm sure there are others would love to have this software ported to Linux. Thanks and have a Merry Christmas and happy new year.





Stiv Ostenberg
 

Hi all;

The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code.

I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity. 

I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.

   What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?

 

P.S>

To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do.  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..

Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS
 

well.. I managed to get it to fire up in Crossover. Just have to get the ports up and running for the tnc and gps. aka the fun part.. but I'm alot farther then I thought i would be. Thank you all for the help and suggestions. I hope you all have a merry xmas and a happy new year.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:32:07 PM MST, Stiv Ostenberg stiv@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

Hi all;

The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code.

I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity. 

I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.

   What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?

 

P.S>

To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do.  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..

Rob Giuliano
 

FYI - as Windows gets more particular with where executable files go, WINE just might follow.
  I still recommend creating a dedicated folder in what WINE calls the C:\ drive ('.wine/drive_c').
  I like using 'c:\WinApps' with subfolders for app categories like 'radio', 'communication','utils', etc. , or some other folder structure that avoids C:\Program Files as the base.


A few other "gotchas" to keep in mind:
1. Windows is CaSe INsensitive, but linus is very CASE SENSITIVE!
2.  Spaces are not advised, but can be handled if the path is in quotes. 
          You could try escaping them with '%20' (no quotes) which is the space character in hex.
     Another reason to use the folder structure above.
3. Your WINE configuration and Windows applications are typically under a user's folder, so only that user will have access.
    /home/{username}/.wine - registry files are here
        key subfolders are drive_c (which becomes C:) and dosdevices - where the links to the TNC
    I can provide some work arounds for those who feel the need
4. USB devices can change on bootup or for other reasons.
    ln -s /dev/ttyUSB0 ~/.wine/dodevices/com4 will create the desired link to your TNC if it is on ttyUSB0, but
        although /dev/ttyUSB0 may be you TNC today, but an arduino or something else tomorrow
       (depending on what type of USB devices you have connected).
    I have also found that if the device hangs, the attempt to reconnect may cause it to jump to /dev/ttyUSB1

    You may consider udev rules to link your TNC to the proper device.
   This can get a bit involved, but a web search will help, or again, I can provide additional infomration
    I have not used Crossover, so that may be a bit different.

Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO





From: "Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: "aprsisce@..."
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 6:37 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
well... I managed to get it to fire up in Crossover. Just have to get the ports up and running for the tnc and gps. aka the fun part.. but I'm alot farther then I thought i would be. Thank you all for the help and suggestions. I hope you all have a merry xmas and a happy new year.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:32:07 PM MST, Stiv Ostenberg stiv@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 
Hi all;
The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code.
I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity. 
I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.
   What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?
 
P.S>
To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do..  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..


Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS
 

I'm using Crossover. Is this info the same for it or just for wine? the port thing. My TNC will always be com1 as ihat is the port on the mudderboard. the question will be the usb gps puck. it should be com 2 or 3 but I have not plugged it in yet to check. How will I be able to figure out what port it's on?

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On ‎Wednesday‎, ‎December‎ ‎12‎, ‎2018‎ ‎07‎:‎34‎:‎58‎ ‎PM‎ ‎MST, Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

FYI - as Windows gets more particular with where executable files go, WINE just might follow.
  I still recommend creating a dedicated folder in what WINE calls the C:\ drive ('.wine/drive_c').
  I like using 'c:\WinApps' with subfolders for app categories like 'radio', 'communication','utils', etc. , or some other folder structure that avoids C:\Program Files as the base.


A few other "gotchas" to keep in mind:
1. Windows is CaSe INsensitive, but linus is very CASE SENSITIVE!
2.  Spaces are not advised, but can be handled if the path is in quotes. 
          You could try escaping them with '%20' (no quotes) which is the space character in hex.
     Another reason to use the folder structure above.
3. Your WINE configuration and Windows applications are typically under a user's folder, so only that user will have access.
    /home/{username}/.wine - registry files are here
        key subfolders are drive_c (which becomes C:) and dosdevices - where the links to the TNC
    I can provide some work arounds for those who feel the need
4. USB devices can change on bootup or for other reasons.
    ln -s /dev/ttyUSB0 ~/.wine/dodevices/com4 will create the desired link to your TNC if it is on ttyUSB0, but
        although /dev/ttyUSB0 may be you TNC today, but an arduino or something else tomorrow
       (depending on what type of USB devices you have connected).
    I have also found that if the device hangs, the attempt to reconnect may cause it to jump to /dev/ttyUSB1

    You may consider udev rules to link your TNC to the proper device.
   This can get a bit involved, but a web search will help, or again, I can provide additional infomration
    I have not used Crossover, so that may be a bit different.

Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO





From: "Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: "aprsisce@..."
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 6:37 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
well... I managed to get it to fire up in Crossover. Just have to get the ports up and running for the tnc and gps. aka the fun part.. but I'm alot farther then I thought i would be. Thank you all for the help and suggestions. I hope you all have a merry xmas and a happy new year.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:32:07 PM MST, Stiv Ostenberg stiv@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 
Hi all;
The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code.
I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity. 
I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.
   What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?
 
P.S>
To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do...  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..


Greg D
 

Hi Larry,

I've used Crossover, but it was quite a while ago and I don't recall exactly how it handles the Registry.  Crossover has the concept of a "bottle", which is kind of a customized Wine environment that's set up on a per-application basis (or is it per application group?), so I suspect that they have a separate set of registry files for each.  The bottles are just subdirectories, if I recall, so a bit of looking around with the file management app of your choice should locate it.  It wouldn't surprise me if the Crossover management app has a way to edit them, too.

For locating the GPS puck, the easiest way is just to plug it in, then check where it landed with the 'dmesg' command.  Should be right at the end. 

Good luck!

Greg  KO6TH


Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:

 
I'm using Crossover. Is this info the same for it or just for wine? the port thing. My TNC will always be com1 as ihat is the port on the mudderboard. the question will be the usb gps puck. it should be com 2 or 3 but I have not plugged it in yet to check. How will I be able to figure out what port it's on?

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On ‎Wednesday‎, ‎December‎ ‎12‎, ‎2018‎ ‎07‎:‎34‎:‎58‎ ‎PM‎ ‎MST, Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 
FYI - as Windows gets more particular with where executable files go, WINE just might follow.
  I still recommend creating a dedicated folder in what WINE calls the C:\ drive ('.wine/drive_c').
  I like using 'c:\WinApps' with subfolders for app categories like 'radio', 'communication','utils', etc. , or some other folder structure that avoids C:\Program Files as the base.


A few other "gotchas" to keep in mind:
1. Windows is CaSe INsensitive, but linus is very CASE SENSITIVE!
2.  Spaces are not advised, but can be handled if the path is in quotes. 
          You could try escaping them with '%20' (no quotes) which is the space character in hex.
     Another reason to use the folder structure above.
3. Your WINE configuration and Windows applications are typically under a user's folder, so only that user will have access..
    /home/{username}/.wine - registry files are here
        key subfolders are drive_c (which becomes C:) and dosdevices - where the links to the TNC
    I can provide some work arounds for those who feel the need
4. USB devices can change on bootup or for other reasons.
    ln -s /dev/ttyUSB0 ~/.wine/dodevices/com4 will create the desired link to your TNC if it is on ttyUSB0, but
        although /dev/ttyUSB0 may be you TNC today, but an arduino or something else tomorrow
       (depending on what type of USB devices you have connected).
    I have also found that if the device hangs, the attempt to reconnect may cause it to jump to /dev/ttyUSB1

    You may consider udev rules to link your TNC to the proper device.
   This can get a bit involved, but a web search will help, or again, I can provide additional infomration
    I have not used Crossover, so that may be a bit different.

Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO





From: "Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce]"
To: "aprsisce@..."
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 6:37 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
well... I managed to get it to fire up in Crossover. Just have to get the ports up and running for the tnc and gps. aka the fun part.. but I'm alot farther then I thought i would be. Thank you all for the help and suggestions. I hope you all have a merry xmas and a happy new year.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:32:07 PM MST, Stiv Ostenberg stiv@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 
Hi all;
The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code.
I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity. 
I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.
   What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?
 
P.S>
To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do....  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..



Rob Giuliano
 

CrossOver is just an "add-on" to WINE, so it should be very similar.  I have not used it, but am quite familiar with WINE.  The concepts will be the same, but as Greg points out, CrossOver uses bottles for each app. From the information I found, you will have a specific bottle directory in place of ".wine" for each app.So if you created a bottle called aprsis32, it would be ~/aprsis32, where '~' is a shortcut to your "home user folder".
The gotchas are still true.In Linux, all devices attached to your computer are files in the folder /devFor COM ports that are physical hardware, Linux uses the standard or /dev/ttyS# (starting at zero)  So you motherboard COM port should be /dev/ttyS0 (case sensitive!!)  In your Crossover setup, you will need a symbolic link to /dev/ttyS0 to com1.     Since this is on the motherboard, it is VERY likely that Crossover will handle this for you.     To check, use the file manager to look in ~/.aprsis32/dosdevices or the equivalent in the Crossover bottle     if not, open that folder and create the shortcut       ln -s /dev/ttyS0 ~/.aprsis32/dosdevice/com1 
One additional GOTCHA>> Linux permissions requires that your user be added to the group that 'owns' these devices.  This group is 'dialout'.
For your USB GPS puck, that will depend on how the GPS reports itself to the Linux OS.  Greg's advice of using 'dmesg' will provide the information, or you can plug in the device and at the prompt type lsusb.
Robert Giuliano KB8RCO

From: "Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce]" <aprsisce@...>
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 11:54 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

  Hi Larry,

I've used Crossover, but it was quite a while ago and I don't recall exactly how it handles the Registry.  Crossover has the concept of a "bottle", which is kind of a customized Wine environment that's set up on a per-application basis (or is it per application group?), so I suspect that they have a separate set of registry files for each.  The bottles are just subdirectories, if I recall, so a bit of looking around with the file management app of your choice should locate it.  It wouldn't surprise me if the Crossover management app has a way to edit them, too.

For locating the GPS puck, the easiest way is just to plug it in, then check where it landed with the 'dmesg' command.  Should be right at the end. 

Good luck!

Greg  KO6TH


Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce] wrote:

  I'm using Crossover. Is this info the same for it or just for wine? the port thing. My TNC will always be com1 as ihat is the port on the mudderboard. the question will be the usb gps puck. it should be com 2 or 3 but I have not plugged it in yet to check. How will I be able to figure out what port it's on?
Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS

On ‎Wednesday‎, ‎December‎ ‎12‎, ‎2018‎ ‎07‎:‎34‎:‎58‎ ‎PM‎ ‎MST, Rob Giuliano @KB8RCO [aprsisce] <aprsisce@...> wrote:

  FYI - as Windows gets more particular with where executable files go, WINE just might follow.   I still recommend creating a dedicated folder in what WINE calls the C:&#92; drive ('.wine/drive_c').   I like using 'c:&#92;WinApps' with subfolders for app categories like 'radio', 'communication','utils', etc. , or some other folder structure that avoids C:&#92;Program Files as the base.

A few other "gotchas" to keep in mind: 1. Windows is CaSe INsensitive, but linus is very CASE SENSITIVE! 2.  Spaces are not advised, but can be handled if the path is in quotes. 
          You could try escaping them with '%20' (no quotes) which is the space character in hex.
     Another reason to use the folder structure above.
3. Your WINE configuration and Windows applications are typically under a user's folder, so only that user will have access..     /home/{username}/.wine - registry files are here         key subfolders are drive_c (which becomes C:) and dosdevices - where the links to the TNC
    I can provide some work arounds for those who feel the need
4. USB devices can change on bootup or for other reasons.     ln -s /dev/ttyUSB0 ~/.wine/dodevices/com4 will create the desired link to your TNC if it is on ttyUSB0, but         although /dev/ttyUSB0 may be you TNC today, but an arduino or something else tomorrow
       (depending on what type of USB devices you have connected).
    I have also found that if the device hangs, the attempt to reconnect may cause it to jump to /dev/ttyUSB1

    You may consider udev rules to link your TNC to the proper device.    This can get a bit involved, but a web search will help, or again, I can provide additional infomration     I have not used Crossover, so that may be a bit different.
Robert Giuliano KB8RCO



From: "Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS k6kusman@... [aprsisce]" <aprsisce@...>
To: "aprsisce@..." <aprsisce@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 6:37 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

  well... I managed to get it to fire up in Crossover. Just have to get the ports up and running for the tnc and gps. aka the fun part.. but I'm alot farther then I thought i would be. Thank you all for the help and suggestions. I hope you all have a merry xmas and a happy new year.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS

On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:32:07 PM MST, Stiv Ostenberg stiv@... [aprsisce] <aprsisce@...> wrote:

  Hi all; The recompile for Linux thing started me thinking (not entirely about the port).  The first question that arose was “What development environment is being used?”.  I personally use Visual Studio primarily, though I have used NetBeans and Eclipse.  I sent to the APRSISCE site to see if I could find out and saw the title of the page “The future of Amateur Radio APRS”.  I was not able to find the information on the code. I am in Korea, and am just a rookie ham who got a license and is starting to get involved in ARES.  A lot to learn, and APRS is high on my list when I get back to the US.  My question is this:
APRSISCE looks great.  It Is a cool tool that is evolving. I have no problem with not having access to the source code, except that I have seen many cool programs that went stagnant when key people went through life changes and lost interest. To really be “The Future” some mechanism would have to exist to make the software open source (which risks the project fragmenting and forking until it died from confusion) or the project had a mechanism to ensure its continuity.  I don’t consider myself a great developer, but I like to mess with source code and have done some pretty cool things (IMHO).  I need to learn how to use the software, then I may want to try helping out if anything pops out I think needs improvement.    What is the plan for the future of APRSISCE along those lines?   P.S> To the person who was so down on Windows I say this:  I came from a Mac background and moved to Unix.  I learned Windows supporting virtualization and eventually ended up at Microsoft for a decade, then back to Linux and the cloud.  I understand the joys of bashing one environment over another, but in the end an environment exists for a reason.  You choose the environment that facilitates accomplishing what you need to do....  For all it’s flaws, Windows is at the core a set of API’s and an environment that is popular for a reason. Visual Studio is my favorite IDE  which lends itself better to writing code for Windows, though I used it for working across platforms as well.  Microsoft is working towards making .NET cross platform though it will never be as robust as the native Windows code.  People that bash Windoze (or Eunuchs or Hacintosh) seem like shortsighted troglodytes who do not realize that the Internet connects all those platforms, and the diversity simply gives us more options and a more vibrant Internet.  I guess that makes my an Internet Polytheist making fun of the Monotheists.  Sigh. And that makes me no better than you…..



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Greg D
 

Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
For your USB GPS puck, that will depend on how the GPS reports itself to the Linux OS.  Greg's advice of using 'dmesg' will provide the information, or you can plug in the device and at the prompt type lsusb.
At least on my system, lsusb only displays the USB device information (manufacturer IDs, strings), but not the /dev/ttyUSBx info.  Do you get more on yours?

Greg  KO6TH

Larry Ellsworth - K6KUS
 

Have not got that far yet. Will try to get the lil bugger connected and see what it shows. I do run this machine in X so everything I do will be in console from desktop. I created the bottle in crossover and the shortcut is on desktop and when I click it it pops right up running. It is connected to the net as it sees traffic but I have not actually got the tnc or the puck hooked up as yet. Might be tomorrow when I drag this box out too the shop and plug things in.

Larry Ellsworth       K6KUS


On ‎Thursday‎, ‎December‎ ‎13‎, ‎2018‎ ‎12‎:‎09‎:‎07‎ ‎PM‎ ‎MST, Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce] wrote:


 

Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:

For your USB GPS puck, that will depend on how the GPS reports itself to the Linux OS.  Greg's advice of using 'dmesg' will provide the information, or you can plug in the device and at the prompt type lsusb.
At least on my system, lsusb only displays the USB device information (manufacturer IDs, strings), but not the /dev/ttyUSBx info.  Do you get more on yours?

Greg  KO6TH

Rob Giuliano
 

lsusb does only provide the IDs and bus info as you say.
I was more generally referencing getting the information on the USB part of the GPS puck. 

Some GPS units don't report as USB serial devices (either FTDI or CP2102 type devices) so never link to /dev/ttyUSB# at all.  One example I experienced was based on the Atmega 32u4F with firmware that reports as a GPS USB device.  As another exmaple, I don't think the Argent Data T3 inside the F301 data radio did not show as a ttyUSB# device.  Most assigned  /dev/ttyACM# as the device.

So, in those cases, you really I created udev rules based off the lsusb information to created files in /dev that can be linked to COM# in WINE. 
I had several for different :
  TNC-X        /dev/tncx
   FC301       /dev/fc301
   Standard USB-to-TTL I used for CAT control of my FT100D, FT900, etc.
       /dev/ft100, /dev/ft900, ...

in the case of the T3, it had vendor=0x134a product=0x9000, so an example udev rule would be:
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x134a", ATTRS{serial}=="T30001", SYMLINK+=”fc301”

SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x0403", ATTRS{serial}=="001011", SYMLINK+=”ft900”
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x0403", ATTRS{serial}=="011001", SYMLINK+=”ft100”

I have found it best to use as few comparisons as possible, but make it to ensure the rule becomes unique.  serial numbers are the best way.  Since many usb to ttl adaptors are TDI, the vender ID is same, so the serial number will determine which link.  

Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO





From: "Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 2:09 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
For your USB GPS puck, that will depend on how the GPS reports itself to the Linux OS.  Greg's advice of using 'dmesg' will provide the information, or you can plug in the device and at the prompt type lsusb.
At least on my system, lsusb only displays the USB device information (manufacturer IDs, strings), but not the /dev/ttyUSBx info.  Do you get more on yours?

Greg  KO6TH


Greg D
 

Hi Rob,

Great info; going to archive this one for posterity! 

I guess I've been lucky.  The GPS puck I have is connected to a Raspberry Pi in my car (so isn't using ARPSIS32, but rather YAAC), but it is seen as a serial device.  I don't remember the brand, however.  I think I got it from SparkFun.

Greg  KO6TH


Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:

 
lsusb does only provide the IDs and bus info as you say.
I was more generally referencing getting the information on the USB part of the GPS puck. 

Some GPS units don't report as USB serial devices (either FTDI or CP2102 type devices) so never link to /dev/ttyUSB# at all.  One example I experienced was based on the Atmega 32u4F with firmware that reports as a GPS USB device.  As another exmaple, I don't think the Argent Data T3 inside the F301 data radio did not show as a ttyUSB# device.  Most assigned  /dev/ttyACM# as the device.

So, in those cases, you really I created udev rules based off the lsusb information to created files in /dev that can be linked to COM# in WINE. 
I had several for different :
  TNC-X        /dev/tncx
   FC301       /dev/fc301
   Standard USB-to-TTL I used for CAT control of my FT100D, FT900, etc.
       /dev/ft100, /dev/ft900, ...

in the case of the T3, it had vendor=0x134a product=0x9000, so an example udev rule would be:
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x134a", ATTRS{serial}=="T30001", SYMLINK+=”fc301”

SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x0403", ATTRS{serial}=="001011", SYMLINK+=”ft900”
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0x0403", ATTRS{serial}=="011001", SYMLINK+=”ft100”

I have found it best to use as few comparisons as possible, but make it to ensure the rule becomes unique.  serial numbers are the best way.  Since many usb to ttl adaptors are TDI, the vender ID is same, so the serial number will determine which link.  

Robert Giuliano
KB8RCO





From: "Greg D ko6th.greg@... [aprsisce]"
To: aprsisce@...
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 2:09 PM
Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Recompile for Linux.

 
Rob Giuliano kb8rco@... [aprsisce] wrote:
For your USB GPS puck, that will depend on how the GPS reports itself to the Linux OS.  Greg's advice of using 'dmesg' will provide the information, or you can plug in the device and at the prompt type lsusb.
At least on my system, lsusb only displays the USB device information (manufacturer IDs, strings), but not the /dev/ttyUSBx info.  Do you get more on yours?

Greg  KO6TH