Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies


Marc Verhaegen
 

Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies:
a Novel Tick-Based Hypothesis for the Evolutionary Divergence of Humans and Chimpanzees
Jeffrey G Brown 2021 Life 11, 435
doi org/10.3390/life11050435

Human straight-legged BPism represents one of the earliest events in the evolutionary split between Homo spp & Pan spp,
but its selective basis is a mystery.
A carrying-related hypothesis has recently been proposed:
did hominin hair-loss result in the inability of babies to cling to their mothers, requiring mothers to walk upright to carry their babies?
But what drove the hair-loss that resulted in upright walking?
Observers since Darwin have suggested that human hair-loss represent an evolutionary strategy for defence against ticks.

This review proposes & s a novel tick-based evolutionary hypothesis:
forest fragmentation in hominin paleo-environments created conditions, favourable for tick proliferation, selecting for divergent anti-tick strategies:
- hair loss in hominins,
- grooming behaviour in chimpanzees.
Did these divergent anti-tick strategies result in different methods for carrying babies, driving the locomotor divergence of humans & chimps?


Nancy Bovee
 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

Nancy Bovee


Gareth Morgan
 

Thanks Nancy.
I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

G.



From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9@...>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 
My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

Nancy Bovee


alandarwinvanarsdale
 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 


On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:
Thanks Nancy.
I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

G.



From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 
My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

Nancy Bovee


fceska_gr
 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


Gareth Morgan
 

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska@...>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


terry turner
 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:
 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


Gareth Morgan
 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

.....I just looked it up. They do.

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 
Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:
 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


fceska_gr
 

Yes, I would say they are “almost” fully aquatic. They do come to land, but not much.

 

I seem to remember (Elaine pointing out?) that small-bodied mammals retain fur/waterproofing, whereas large mammals lose their fur. Sea-otters have no blubber so they use their fur for both insulation and buoyancy.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:46 AM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

 

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

 

.....I just looked it up. They do.

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

 

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

 

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

 

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

 

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

 

G.

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


Gareth Morgan
 

 “almost” fully aquatic.


Here's another opinion/definition, based on the way the back legs work...

 we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.


G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:50 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 

Yes, I would say they are “almost” fully aquatic. They do come to land, but not much.

 

I seem to remember (Elaine pointing out?) that small-bodied mammals retain fur/waterproofing, whereas large mammals lose their fur. Sea-otters have no blubber so they use their fur for both insulation and buoyancy.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:46 AM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

 

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

 

.....I just looked it up. They do.

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

 

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

 

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

 

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

 

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

 

G.

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


fceska_gr
 

Ok, then! 😊

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:02 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 “almost” fully aquatic.

 

 

Here's another opinion/definition, based on the way the back legs work...

 

 we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

 

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:50 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Yes, I would say they are “almost” fully aquatic. They do come to land, but not much.

 

I seem to remember (Elaine pointing out?) that small-bodied mammals retain fur/waterproofing, whereas large mammals lose their fur. Sea-otters have no blubber so they use their fur for both insulation and buoyancy.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:46 AM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

 

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

 

.....I just looked it up. They do.

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

 

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

 

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

 

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

 

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

 

G.

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


terry turner
 

Thank you Gareth Morgan for sharing this link. Remember also that sea otters are also fully adapted to the marine environment. The other otters are adapted to a freshwater environment.
The exception to fresh water is the  marine otter (Lontra felina).It is a semi-aquatic and the smallest marine mammal. I believe they give birth on land with multiple pups.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_otter
Terry

On Thu, May 5, 2022 at 4:17 AM fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io> wrote:

Ok, then! 😊

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:02 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 “almost” fully aquatic.

 

 

Here's another opinion/definition, based on the way the back legs work...

 

 we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

 

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:50 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Yes, I would say they are “almost” fully aquatic. They do come to land, but not much.

 

I seem to remember (Elaine pointing out?) that small-bodied mammals retain fur/waterproofing, whereas large mammals lose their fur. Sea-otters have no blubber so they use their fur for both insulation and buoyancy.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:46 AM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

 

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

 

.....I just looked it up. They do.

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

 

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

 

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

 

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

 

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

 

G.

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee


Gareth Morgan
 

the  marine otter (Lontra felina)

Thanks Terry. I had never heard of these little guys.

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2022 6:37 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies
 
Thank you Gareth Morgan for sharing this link. Remember also that sea otters are also fully adapted to the marine environment. The other otters are adapted to a freshwater environment.
The exception to fresh water is the  marine otter (Lontra felina).It is a semi-aquatic and the smallest marine mammal. I believe they give birth on land with multiple pups.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_otter
Terry

On Thu, May 5, 2022 at 4:17 AM fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io> wrote:

Ok, then! 😊

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:02 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 “almost” fully aquatic.

 

 

Here's another opinion/definition, based on the way the back legs work...

 

 we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

 

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:50 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Yes, I would say they are “almost” fully aquatic. They do come to land, but not much.

 

I seem to remember (Elaine pointing out?) that small-bodied mammals retain fur/waterproofing, whereas large mammals lose their fur. Sea-otters have no blubber so they use their fur for both insulation and buoyancy.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gareth Morgan
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 11:46 AM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

 The sea otter is both fully aquatic...

 

Does anybody know if the sea otter give birth in the water?

 

.....I just looked it up. They do.

 

G.


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of terry turner <terry.turner1602@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2022 5:20 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Remember the exception  for fully aquatic mammals The sea otter is both fully aquatic and has a  dense coat of hair.
Terry

 

On Mon, May 2, 2022 at 10:45 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

 born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat

 

All seals and sealions have two layers of fur. Outer guard hairs and a soft insulating underlayer. The pups lose their fluffy baby coat when that adult coat develops. They just look sleek when wet so it looks like dolphin skin. So they fit in with your polar bears and beavers.

 

"Seals have two layers of barb-like hair : a visible outer layer that is comprised of long, dark hairs and an inner, down-like layer of underfur. Referred to as “guard hairs,” the outer hairs keep the inner layer warm and dry. The hairs have a barbed structure that helps them stick together, seal in air, and heat." https://www.neaq.org/blog/the-physics-of-fur-seal-hair/

 

Sorry it's a physics site 😉

 

G.

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of fceska_gr via groups.io <f-ceska=odysseysailing.gr@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:10 PM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

“Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)?”

 

The pattern seems to show that all fully aquatic mammals lose their fur (cetaceans), semi-aquatic or historically semi-aquatic mammals in tropical or subtropical zones lose their fur (hippos, elephants, rhinos, pigs), while semi-aquatic mammals in colder areas adapt their fur to make it waterproof (polar bears, beavers, voles, etc.) Seal pups that are born on land in arctic conditions are born with fur, but quickly lose this and replace it with fat by the time they enter the water. Fur is obviously an important insulator in cold environments if anytime is spent on land, so beavers could not do away with it completely.

 

F.

 

From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> On Behalf Of alandarwinvanarsdale
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2022 6:00 PM
To: AAT@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

Aquatic mammals with hair usually have little hair that does not affect much or hair of types which keep the skin dry. Hominids do not have the type of hair which can keep the skin dry. 

 

On Fri, Apr 29, 2022 at 3:02 AM Gareth Morgan <garethmorgan@...> wrote:

Thanks Nancy.

I have a similar idea about hairlessness, but concerning mud fever (leptospirosis), which affects fertility and can be fatal, while fungal infections seem to be less so. Details here -- https://www.academia.edu/40664984/The_Acheulean_hand_axe_a_toolmakers_perspective  -- at the end of the section headed Now eat your clam.

 

G.

 

 


From: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io> on behalf of Nancy Bovee via groups.io <empress9=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2022 11:29 AM
To: AAT@groups.io <AAT@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AAT] Ticks, Hair Loss, and Non-Clinging Babies

 

My theory has long been that fungal infections drove hairlessness. Features don't evolve to do something. Lethal features kill off those without a less lethal feature - such as hairlessness. but it's still conjecture. Why are some littoral beasts fur covered (i.e. beavers) and others nearly naked (elephants, rhinos, hippos)? 

 

I do think it has something to do with lethality during infancy.

 

Nancy Bovee