Date   
Armed Forces Day Cross-Band Test 2019

Michael Callaham
 

Thanks, Paul.

If you, dear reader, would like to operate there, at the Pentagon, this
year, 2019, please contact Gary KC5QCN <kc5qcn@...> as soon as
possible. Arrangements must be made in advance.

There are two other ways to participate: 1. as an amateur radio
operator transmitting an amateur radio frequencies and listening to
military stations on military frequencies, and 2. as a shortwave
listener (SWL).

The rules for 2019 may be announced at <http://www.usarmymars.org/event
s/armed-forces-day> and the form on that page for requesting a QSL card
may be restored.

73,
--Mike NW3V
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

Armed Forces Day Cross-Band Test 2019

Paul Wilson
 

This year's event is scheduled for May 11. More details will be forthcoming.

Here are some photos from last year's activities, courtesy of the Pentagon
ARC's website.

http://www.k4af.org/2018_AFDCBT/2018_AFDCBT.htm

You might see some familiar faces.

Ionospheric audio and image mixing

Benn Kobb
 

https://www.ghostsintheairglow.space

"Pairing air glow experiments in the ionosphere—false auroras creating soft, glowing spots in the sky—with SSTV images, audio and image signals articulated by artist Amanda Dawn Christie will be received and decoded via SDR (Software Defined Radio) equipment by amateur radio operators around the world, and streamed live online for audiences who do not have the equipment or expertise for reception. Viewing and listening gatherings will be organized for the final transmissions, in various cities, where audiences can experience the transmissions collectively."

ARES E-letter for March 20, 2019

Michael Callaham
 

The ARES E-letter for March 20, 2019, is available at:
<http://www.arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2019-03-20>.

73,
--Mike NW3V
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

Two notable FCC actions today (PDF files)

Benn Kobb
 

1. FCC releases spectrum above 95 GHz to new uses.
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DOC-356588A1.pdf

2. FCC inspects amateur station and is not happy with amateur.
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DOC-356614A1.pdf

Home page updated with info on meeting tomorrow

Michael Callaham
 

I have just updated the AARC home page <http://www.w4wvp.org> with
information on the meeting tomorrow, including the program to be
presented.

73,
--Mike nw3v
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

Text of proposal to change Technician licensing, accepted by FCC today

Benn Kobb
 

The FCC today accepted an ARRL petition to make changes to Technician Class amateur radio licensing.

Accepted doesn't mean the FCC has adopted the ARRL's proposals and changed the rules, but it does open a 30 day period for public comment.

The Petition is now known as RM-11828 and at the moment can be a bit difficult to find, but I found it:

https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/1022823795806/2018%20Entry%20Level%20License%20PRM%20FINAL.pdf

Re: Federal Regulations link to most current and updated Regs. Published in the Federal Register. Part 97 complete with changes. This was copied from Ian at the Alexandria Club Website.I am posting the link. It's content is current as of February.

Paul Wilson KI4PW
 

Hello Al,

This appears to be a link to 47 CFR Part 97 in its entirety. I see no notations about any changes, and I'm not aware of any significant changes to Part 97 that have made their way through the rule-making process recently.

Parties regularly offer petitions to the FCC re: Part 97, but very few are taken up by the Commission. ARRL is usually the best source--most of us don't have time to wade into the arcana the Federal Register.

You can track FCC actions in the Federal Register here:

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/federal-communications-commission

If you search under Part 97, the latest Commission action of any significance re: the Amateur Radio Service covers operations on the 2200m and 630m bands. It dates from 2017.

ARRL Worked All States on 60m?

Paul Wilson
 

Following up on my comments on tonight's net, I pulled the
ARNewsline transcript. It reads:

*"JOHN: It took four years but Andre ZED-S-2-ACP finally worked all 50 of
the United States on 60 metres, receiving the Worked All States award from
the ARRL."*

But, ARRL says 60m contacts are not eligible for the WAS award.

1.


*"3) Two-way communication must be established on amateur bands with each
state. There is no minimum signal report required. Any or all bands may be
used (with the exception of 60 Meters). The District of Columbia may be
counted for Maryland."*

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/WAS_Rules_2015_with_fees.pdf

Federal Regulations link to most current and updated Regs. Published in the Federal Register. Part 97 complete with changes. This was copied from Ian at the Alexandria Club Website.I am posting the link. It's content is current as of February.

DrZ1953
 

Here is the link for CFR 47 and complete Part 97 of interest to all Amateurs.
http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&SID=29d07c524e7302d66780275fae519299&rgn=div5&view=text&node=47:5.0.1.1.6&idno=47
There are quite a few changes.
K4ZB / Al

Link to APRS presentation by Aaron, KN4GXC, is now on w4wvp.org Resources page

Michael Callaham
 

A link to the APRS presentation by Aaron, KN4GXC, is now on the
w4wvp.org Resources page. Thanks to Aaron for the presentation and for
providing the link.

--Mike NW3V
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

Arlington Amateur Radio Club -- March meeting announcement

Paul Wilson KI4PW
 

Please join us for the March meeting of the Arlington Amateur Radio Club.

Date and time: March 19, 2019, 7 p.m.

Place: St. Thomas More Cathedral School, 105 N. Thomas St, Arlington, Va.

Talk-in: W4WVP/R, 145.470 MHz, -600 kHz offset, PL 107.2

Program: to be determined.

Re: New ARRL podcast for beginners: So Now What?

John Person
 

Thanks, Mike

Jack.

We could probably plug the podcast orally during the net Portion/.

I will have the ARNewsline on the air Tuesday.

jack

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 10:12 PM Michael Callaham via Groups.Io <vze32sw5=
verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

The new ARRL podcast, So Now What?, is targeted at beginners--say,
those who have passed the Technician Class exam, and are wondering what
to do next. It debuted today. ARRL members and non-members alike may
visit <http://www.arrl.org/so-now-what> and subscribe to the podcast or
scroll down to the archive section and download .mp3 files of previous
podcasts, which is what I did this evening. The introductory podcast is
already available as an archive file for download. It is just over 10
minutes long. The podcast is produced biweekly, alternating with the
"The Doctor Is In" podcast.

Please download or subscribe and listen to it. Do you like it?

I had hoped that this might be something that the W4WVP news hosts
(KK4EBG, W2JWP, KD9XB, and sometimes others) could air, just as they
have aired ARRL Audio News, but I think the licensing is more
restrictive than for ARRL Audio News. The introductory podcast includes
a commercial from LDG, a maker of antenna tuners, and suggests that
future podcasts will also be sponsored by LDG. Airing such commercial
content over the air on Amateur Radio is prohibited by "Part 97,"
that is, Title 47, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 97. There is a
sentence at the end of the introductory podcast prohibiting
unauthorized reproduction etc. I do not yet see a means of requesting
authorization to air the podcast, less the ad. Perhaps that will not be
allowed.

In any case, the podcast is available for download or subscription by
new hams or aspiring-to-be hams or old-timers. I recommend it. You maylike
it.

73 (Best Regards),
--Mike NW3V



--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.



New ARRL podcast for beginners: So Now What?

Michael Callaham
 

The new ARRL podcast, So Now What?, is targeted at beginners--say,
those who have passed the Technician Class exam, and are wondering what
to do next. It debuted today. ARRL members and non-members alike may
visit <http://www.arrl.org/so-now-what> and subscribe to the podcast or
scroll down to the archive section and download .mp3 files of previous
podcasts, which is what I did this evening. The introductory podcast is
already available as an archive file for download. It is just over 10
minutes long. The podcast is produced biweekly, alternating with the
"The Doctor Is In" podcast.

Please download or subscribe and listen to it. Do you like it?

I had hoped that this might be something that the W4WVP news hosts
(KK4EBG, W2JWP, KD9XB, and sometimes others) could air, just as they
have aired ARRL Audio News, but I think the licensing is more
restrictive than for ARRL Audio News. The introductory podcast includes
a commercial from LDG, a maker of antenna tuners, and suggests that
future podcasts will also be sponsored by LDG. Airing such commercial
content over the air on Amateur Radio is prohibited by "Part 97,"
that is, Title 47, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 97. There is a
sentence at the end of the introductory podcast prohibiting
unauthorized reproduction etc. I do not yet see a means of requesting
authorization to air the podcast, less the ad. Perhaps that will not be
allowed.

In any case, the podcast is available for download or subscription by
new hams or aspiring-to-be hams or old-timers. I recommend it. You maylike it.

73 (Best Regards),
--Mike NW3V



--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

AMRAD meeting program on Montgomery County CERT and VERT

Michael Callaham
 

Not directly about Arlington or AARC, but I think of interest to some
in the AARC and/or Arlington CERT:

AMRAD has updated their home page at www.amrad.org with this info about
their March meeting:

8<- - - - -
At the March 16 meeting,  Steve Peterson will give a presentation on
Humanity Road/VERT presentation.  Mont Co CERT has developed a program
to retain members’ interest in serving their community. The
presentation discusses virtual activations by their VERT and includes
lessons learned and best practices.
8<- - - - -

I suppose VERT means Virtual Emergency Response Team, but I suppose
we'll have to see and hear the presentation to find out. The AMRAD home
page has full info, not only about where the meeting will be, but also
where to gather for tacos beforehand, which is how one learns when the
meeting will be starting.

Thanks to Al K4ZB for noting that the AMRAD home page has been updated.

I note that the March AMRAD meeting coincides with the first day of the
Virginia QSO Party:
<https://www.qsl.net/sterling/VA_QSO_Party/2019_VQP/2019_VQP_Main.html>
.

You may want to use this opportunity to operate as an expedition
(portable) or mobile station in Fairfax.

73,
--Mike nw3v
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

VA QSO Party 16-17 March

Paul Wilson KI4PW
 

As mentioned on Tuesday night's net, the Virginia QSO Party will be held on 16 and 17 March. Operating hours are 10 am-12 midnight (local) on Saturday March 16, and 8 am - 8 pm (local) on Sunday March 17. Exchange is QSO serial number and three-character county or independent city abbreviation.

https://www.qsl.net/sterling/VA_QSO_Party/2019_VQP/2019_VQP_Main.html

There are no rule changes from last year.

We always have strong showing with number of QSOs and logs submitted. If you are a club member, make sure you include "Arlington ARC" in the appropriate field of your submitted log.

I hope to operate for at least part of the day on Saturday and Sunday.

Last couple of years 80 meters has been the hot spot for in-state QSOs. Now that I have an outdoor VHF antenna I've upped my totals for 2m contacts. Calling frequency on VHF is 146.580 MHz simplex.

ARES E-letter for February 20, 2019

Michael Callaham
 

The ARES E-letter for February 1620, 2019, is available at:
<http://www.arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2019-02-20>.

73,
--Mike NW3V
--
Science matters. Matter matters.
Energy matters, including dark energy.

Re: beginner question

Jerry
 

Thank you Paul.
I read good things about the Yaesu FT60 but mixed reviews on its replacement the FT65.
I’ll continue to research and maybe I can still find the FT60. It was more than I was initially wanting to spend but, as you said, you get what you pay for.

Jerry

On Feb 19, 2019, at 9:15 AM, Paul Wilson <dcmcrider@...> wrote:

Hi Jerry, and welcome to the group.

I own three handheld radios: a Yaesu FT60, a Baofeng UV-5R, and a Tytera
MD-380. The Tytera operates on analog and DMR (digital mobile radio) in the
440 band. The Yaesu and Baofeng are analog-only FM dual-band (2-meter and
70-cm band.) I don't think a tri-bander (with 220 MHz) is really necessary
as a first radio. The Yaesu was my first radio when I got into the hobby
four years ago and it's given good reliable service. A handheld is a great
way to get started. Handhelds transmitting 5W can hit all the local
repeaters if you have decent line of sight.

The Baofengs have developed a bad rap, not the least of which was generated
last summer by an FCC enforcement action against their importers. The
Baofengs are easily modified to transmit (illegally) outside amateur
frequencies. Of the two as a "Desert Island Radio," I'd definitely pick the
Yaesu. It's very rugged and has much better battery life from the supplied
battery pack. By comparison, the Baofeng's build quality is a little
cheesy. But keep in mind it's also a $30 radio, and you tend to get what
you pay for. With the either one, invest in a decent antenna. The "rubber
duck" that's supplied with the Baofeng--throw it in the junk drawer, or use
it to stir your coffee. That's about all it's good for.

With either radio, I'd strongly recommend picking up a programming cable in
order to use CHIRP.
[https://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home] Programming
either rig from the keypad is tedious, although the Yaesu keypad is a
little friendlier. On the Baofeng you have to hunt through menus for *all *the
settings, including squelch. The Yaesu has a squelch knob, which I much
prefer, and you can access various features like "reverse" with one touch
from the keypad. The Baofeng also emits a loud and annoying "pop" when the
squelch opens.

These are just one user's opinion. Ask around.

Paul / KI4PW

On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 8:33 PM Jerry <jerry_foster1@...> wrote:

Hello all,
I initially sent this to the club’s general email account and Mike
Callaham, NW3V, suggested i submit to this group.

My son and I are studying for the Technician Class license exam and at the
same time are learning about and researching to buy our first radio.
Unfortunately I’ll be traveling for work this week and am not able to
attend the monthly meeting or I would introduce myself and ask in person.

I’m thinking of starting with a handheld transceiver and adding/upgrading
from there as we grow into it.

The Baofeng’s seem to get good reviews as an entry-level radio at an
affordable price.
I found one model (UV-5X3) that is a tri-band that includes the 220-225
MHz band.
From what I’ve read on-line, that band has been less-used in the past but
I don’t know if that has changed.

so my questions are:
1. Should I look only at radios that include the 220-225MHz band? is this
an important feature for a first radio?
2. Do you have any concerns about starting with a handheld?
3. Do you have any comments or concerns about Baofeng’s in general? Until
I saw the UV-5X3 I was looking at the UV-82HP or the BF-F8HP (though the
lower speaker power has me leaning towards the UV-82HP).

thank you for your time,
Jerry Foster




Re: beginner question

John Person
 

Thanks for sharing, Paul

See you tonight.

Jack Person

-----Original Message-----
From: AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io <AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Wilson
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 9:15 AM
To: AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AARC-PUBLIC] beginner question

Hi Jerry, and welcome to the group.

I own three handheld radios: a Yaesu FT60, a Baofeng UV-5R, and a Tytera MD-380. The Tytera operates on analog and DMR (digital mobile radio) in the
440 band. The Yaesu and Baofeng are analog-only FM dual-band (2-meter and 70-cm band.) I don't think a tri-bander (with 220 MHz) is really necessary as a first radio. The Yaesu was my first radio when I got into the hobby four years ago and it's given good reliable service. A handheld is a great way to get started. Handhelds transmitting 5W can hit all the local repeaters if you have decent line of sight.

The Baofengs have developed a bad rap, not the least of which was generated last summer by an FCC enforcement action against their importers. The Baofengs are easily modified to transmit (illegally) outside amateur frequencies. Of the two as a "Desert Island Radio," I'd definitely pick the Yaesu. It's very rugged and has much better battery life from the supplied battery pack. By comparison, the Baofeng's build quality is a little cheesy. But keep in mind it's also a $30 radio, and you tend to get what you pay for. With the either one, invest in a decent antenna. The "rubber duck" that's supplied with the Baofeng--throw it in the junk drawer, or use it to stir your coffee. That's about all it's good for.

With either radio, I'd strongly recommend picking up a programming cable in order to use CHIRP.
[https://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home] Programming either rig from the keypad is tedious, although the Yaesu keypad is a little friendlier. On the Baofeng you have to hunt through menus for *all *the settings, including squelch. The Yaesu has a squelch knob, which I much prefer, and you can access various features like "reverse" with one touch from the keypad. The Baofeng also emits a loud and annoying "pop" when the squelch opens.

These are just one user's opinion. Ask around.

Paul / KI4PW

On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 8:33 PM Jerry <jerry_foster1@...> wrote:

Hello all,
I initially sent this to the club’s general email account and Mike
Callaham, NW3V, suggested i submit to this group.

My son and I are studying for the Technician Class license exam and at
the same time are learning about and researching to buy our first radio.
Unfortunately I’ll be traveling for work this week and am not able to
attend the monthly meeting or I would introduce myself and ask in person.

I’m thinking of starting with a handheld transceiver and
adding/upgrading from there as we grow into it.

The Baofeng’s seem to get good reviews as an entry-level radio at an
affordable price.
I found one model (UV-5X3) that is a tri-band that includes the
220-225 MHz band.
From what I’ve read on-line, that band has been less-used in the past
but I don’t know if that has changed.

so my questions are:
1. Should I look only at radios that include the 220-225MHz band? is
this an important feature for a first radio?
2. Do you have any concerns about starting with a handheld?
3. Do you have any comments or concerns about Baofeng’s in general?
Until I saw the UV-5X3 I was looking at the UV-82HP or the BF-F8HP
(though the lower speaker power has me leaning towards the UV-82HP).

thank you for your time,
Jerry Foster



Re: beginner question

Paul Wilson
 

Hi Jerry, and welcome to the group.

I own three handheld radios: a Yaesu FT60, a Baofeng UV-5R, and a Tytera
MD-380. The Tytera operates on analog and DMR (digital mobile radio) in the
440 band. The Yaesu and Baofeng are analog-only FM dual-band (2-meter and
70-cm band.) I don't think a tri-bander (with 220 MHz) is really necessary
as a first radio. The Yaesu was my first radio when I got into the hobby
four years ago and it's given good reliable service. A handheld is a great
way to get started. Handhelds transmitting 5W can hit all the local
repeaters if you have decent line of sight.

The Baofengs have developed a bad rap, not the least of which was generated
last summer by an FCC enforcement action against their importers. The
Baofengs are easily modified to transmit (illegally) outside amateur
frequencies. Of the two as a "Desert Island Radio," I'd definitely pick the
Yaesu. It's very rugged and has much better battery life from the supplied
battery pack. By comparison, the Baofeng's build quality is a little
cheesy. But keep in mind it's also a $30 radio, and you tend to get what
you pay for. With the either one, invest in a decent antenna. The "rubber
duck" that's supplied with the Baofeng--throw it in the junk drawer, or use
it to stir your coffee. That's about all it's good for.

With either radio, I'd strongly recommend picking up a programming cable in
order to use CHIRP.
[https://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home] Programming
either rig from the keypad is tedious, although the Yaesu keypad is a
little friendlier. On the Baofeng you have to hunt through menus for *all *the
settings, including squelch. The Yaesu has a squelch knob, which I much
prefer, and you can access various features like "reverse" with one touch
from the keypad. The Baofeng also emits a loud and annoying "pop" when the
squelch opens.

These are just one user's opinion. Ask around.

Paul / KI4PW

On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 8:33 PM Jerry <jerry_foster1@...> wrote:

Hello all,
I initially sent this to the club’s general email account and Mike
Callaham, NW3V, suggested i submit to this group.

My son and I are studying for the Technician Class license exam and at the
same time are learning about and researching to buy our first radio.
Unfortunately I’ll be traveling for work this week and am not able to
attend the monthly meeting or I would introduce myself and ask in person.

I’m thinking of starting with a handheld transceiver and adding/upgrading
from there as we grow into it.

The Baofeng’s seem to get good reviews as an entry-level radio at an
affordable price.
I found one model (UV-5X3) that is a tri-band that includes the 220-225
MHz band.
From what I’ve read on-line, that band has been less-used in the past but
I don’t know if that has changed.

so my questions are:
1. Should I look only at radios that include the 220-225MHz band? is this
an important feature for a first radio?
2. Do you have any concerns about starting with a handheld?
3. Do you have any comments or concerns about Baofeng’s in general? Until
I saw the UV-5X3 I was looking at the UV-82HP or the BF-F8HP (though the
lower speaker power has me leaning towards the UV-82HP).

thank you for your time,
Jerry Foster